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Topic ID 3475

19/03/2008 by Dave

Goldings

Does anyone remember The William Baker Technical School, (GOLDINGS) it was a Barnardo's Home, and School for Boys. It was situated in Waterford on The North Road just outside Hertford. It opened in 1922 and closed in 1967. Lots of boys from the school still live in Hertford and the surrounding areas, and we all get back together each year for our annual reunion. It would be good to hear from anyone who can help me to form the History of the school with stories or photographs. As a pupil of the school I have created a Website please visit www.goldings.org Dave


Replies

Reply ID 50765

19/03/2008 by Deveraux

It's mentioned in the autobiographical work "This Time Next Week" by Leslie Thomas - best known for his book "The Virgin Soldiers" He was a Barnado boy and spent some time there during the 2nd World War.


Reply ID 50766

20/03/2008 by Dave

Leslie Thomas was one of the many boys that became successful from Goldings, along with Frank Norman who wrote the book "The Banana Boys" and the musical "Fings Ain't What They Used to Be" but died at a very early age, Alan Blackburn who represented Hertfordshire at football, and went on to sign for West Ham. Sadly there was also the failures like all things in life, and 12 Goldings boys are buried in Waterford Churchyard, along with staff members (visit our site "The Boys that never left Goldings) but as a former pupil of the school I enjoyed every minute I spent there, and the sleepy town of Hertford with your outdoor swimming pool, Saturday afternoon ,when we were allowed free time in Hertford after doing our "Chores" of cleaning that fine old Mansion, but on report if we didn't get back by 5'o'clock,which could mean the cane if you didn't have a reasonable excuse why you were late. The post office and cafe in Waterford, were we for a short moment got away from the mundane food in the week and had "Spaghetti on Toast" 1/6p,half ounce of "Old Holborn" then we were "skint" all of our 2/9p pocket money gone till next Saturday. I saw my first Bond movie at the "County" Cinema, the countryside was a revelation to me coming from the "Black Country" Many fond memories of our adopted town of "Hertford" The school was controlled by the "Bugle" as many of the locals set there watch's by it. Our Cadet force and Band which I sure many of the senior members of Hertford will recall. The "Gym Squad" that was displayed throughout the County, and the kindness shown to us by townspeople of Hertford, and the few who scorned us "It's them Goldings Boys" Happy days...Dave Blower 1962-65 William Baker Technical School.


Reply ID 50768

20/03/2008 by Leo Densian

Interesting site you have created Dave - well done. I knew very little about its time as a Barnado's home. How ironic that having once been the home for kids with virtually nothing it is now a millionaires row.


Reply ID 50771

20/03/2008 by dennismoore

A fascinating website Dave, well done for creating it. I used to love going for walks around the grounds at Goldings back when it was council offices, that wonderful vista looking up towards the main house was always a good one to show visitors. Does anyone know if you can still walk there?


Reply ID 50773

20/03/2008 by Andrew

quote:
Originally posted by dennismoore
A fascinating website Dave, well done for creating it. I used to love going for walks around the grounds at Goldings back when it was council offices, that wonderful vista looking up towards the main house was always a good one to show visitors. Does anyone know if you can still walk there?
Not sure what the official line is, but access is easy from Waterford behind the church, also from the footpath that runs through the trees alongside North Road after it crosses the river at Molewood and also from the private road from the Bramfield Road to Broadoak End. The main entrance off North road is gated with access codes, but is sometimes open. never had any hassle walking there in the last few years


Reply ID 50779

20/03/2008 by Jaycee

Great website Dave...thanks for sharing.As well as members here, I am sure that there will be quite a few ex-pupils/teachers who will enjoy it[img]http://www.smilies-and-more.de/pics/smilies/persons/021.gif[/img] I am sure you have seen this site too, but thought I would add the link in case anyone else was interested. http://www.smilies-and-more.de/pics/smilies/persons/021.gif[/img] It is great to see the old and new pictures...indeed.. those of the millionaire's place are an eye-opener [img]http://www.smilies-and-more.de/pics/smilies/persons/021.gif[/img]


Reply ID 50814

21/03/2008 by cassie414

My grandmother was at Goldings when it was a Barnardo's home. She died when I was tiny so I don't remember her. I believe she came from a very large family in London and was sponsored by a Mrs Annie Tyler from Tewin. I have my grandmothers' prayer books from Tewin School given to her in 1900. I remember the building as council offices and I seem to remember sledging down a slope one winter with my cousins, must be around the back.


Reply ID 50816

21/03/2008 by Dave

Don't forget also that we Goldings lads? (a bit long in the tooth now) were the official ball boys for Wimbleden from 1946 untill the close in 1967. Only 60 boys were allowed to go out of 200, so it became very difficult to go, especially if you had been on any report,then you had no chance. The outdoor swimming pool (which now has been filled in) situated to the right of the second bridge as you entered from North Road. This was dug out by the boys to save £200-00 in 1938,95ft x 35ft,prior to that they swam in the river. Next to the swimming pool was our Hard Tennis courts, again mainly built by the staff and boys to save money, £100-00 pounds was donated by the Lawn Tennis Club in apreciation of the Ball Boys, in the mid 50s, but sadly long gone. The printers also did the printing for the Hertford Rag, and I remember Mark Wynter opening it 1962, just outside Hertford North Station. I remember the Wimpy Bar opposite the Castle Gates, the building is still there, I think it now is a bookies? I had my Buddy Holly glasses from the opticians, by the Thai resturaunt by the war memorial. Many of the staff were local, and well known families in the area, Mr Lionel Wrangles was one, who was a junior gardener there before the school, and remained untill the close. Mr and Mrs Maslin were also founding staff who also remained untill there retirement in 1965. One of the old boys was there when the Doodlebug hit the bridge by the castle cinema, and heard it cut out before exploding, because at the time the local fire watch thought it had landed at Goldings and raced up there to make sure the boys were safe. Mr Battell the sports master was killed in the grounds by the clock (which is still there)which was the former stables, but in Goldings days was mainly the Print Shop. He came out to make sure the boys were safe, and was killed by a parchute bomb, and is now buried in Waterford Church Yard 1941. We have since 1958 officially held our re-unions back in Hertford on the first Saturday in October, this year at Sele Farm Community Hall, Perret Gardens, and any one is welcome to visit as we display many old photos of the school and Hertford on the day. I am now trying to trace families of our former staff to hear there stories of there time at Goldings, because these helped the school to the success it acheived, so surely should be added to our history and the important input they gave to us,Ron Stackwood, Sid Whitbread, Mr Purkis and his brother, Mr and Mrs Fordham Below a Staff list from 1962(from the school magazine The Goldonian) Is anyone related to these names, and can you help with photos or stories you can relate to Goldings. Also has anyone got a good picture of Hertford North Station 50s - 60s for the site ( This is the Station we used when we went on leave from Goldings. Headmaster, MR. R. F. WHEATLEY, B.SC. Deputy Headmaster,' Mr. L. E. Embleton, N.D.H. Chief Matron, Mrs. L. E. Embleton Chaplain, The Rev. B. L. Nixon, B.A.(HON.), DIP.TH.(DUNELM) OFFICE Mr. J. Maslin, Mr. J. L. Ridehalgh, Mr. K. R. Wood RESIDENT HOUSE STAFF Aberdeen House: Mr. C. Steele Cairns House: Mr. and Mrs. R. Ellis MacAndrew House: Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Moore Pelham House: Mr. and Mrs. J. Hunt Somerset House: Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Edwardes Housemasters: Mr. A. P. Culver, Mr. J. H. Clarke Boilerman: Mr. J. Sims; Handyman: Mr. E. Blackwell SICK BAY Mrs. F. Farmer, S.R.N., Miss E. S. Bateman KITCHEN Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Edwards, Mr. C. A. Cooper NON-RESIDENT HOME STAFF Staff Room Matron: Mrs. F. Darton Mr. S. Whitbread, Mr. W. Gardner, Miss M. Jeffreys, Mrs. F. E. Parratt Mrs. M. E. Perrin, Mrs. M. Cannings MAINTENANCE Mr. A. H. Hooper (Chief), Mr. H. Wilkins, Mr. J. Cole SCHOOL AND TRADE DEPARTMENTS SCHOOL Mr. F. Sheppard, Mr. R. Newton, Mr. J. Rowlands BOOTMAKING Mr. F. Tordoff, A.B.S.I., Mr. W. Nunn, Mr. E. Braddock BUILDING: CARPENTRY Mr. H. W. Tempest, Mr. W. Broster, Mr. L. Farnham, Mr. T. E. Nutter BUILDING: PAINTING AND DECORATING Mr. A. E. Brooks, Mr. S. G. Monies, Mr. J. Ibbotson GARDENING Mr. L. E. Embleton, N.D.H., Mr. L. Wrangles, Mr. S. Roper, Mr. S. Vince, Mr. F. Greenhill, Mr. W. Kuscharski PRINTING Mr. W. H. Millar, Mr. R. Stackwood, Mr. P. F. East, Mr. N. T. Powell, Mr. R. C. Fox, Mr. F. Stevenson Mr. W. Purkis, Mr. R. Purkis, Mr. L. G. Mondin, Mr. J. H. Taylor SHEET METAL WORK Mr. H. de' Boeck, Mr. M. Brierley WATERFORD VERNEY HOSTEL Mr. and Mrs. R. Newton, Mrs. P. Kemp, Mrs. Ephgrave Many thanks Dave


Reply ID 50830

23/03/2008 by Muddy

Thanks Dave for reminding us about Goldings' interesting history. On snowy days, like today, you could also toboggan down the steep hill opposite the manor house. Like Dennis & Andrew, I remember walking & running in the grounds prior to the redevelopment. I too used to get in using the Broad Oak Lane, or behind Waterford Church but I thought that all the footpaths were now out of bounds. I'll wander over there later today to check out the trespassing situation.


Reply ID 50833

23/03/2008 by dutch knight

I grew up living on Goldings Lane, and my parents only moved away 4 years ago.I think some of the public footpaths remain ,but only around the outskirts of the estate.I remember watching the football matches on a Sunday morning on the pitches behind Goldings Lane. I can't remember when The Verney closed, but in the late 1970s and early 1980s there were boys still staying there and I think they learnt their printing skills somewhere on Mead Lane


Reply ID 50841

23/03/2008 by Dave

Many thanks to all your interesting replies,the famous slide at Goldings was about 40 to 60 ft long and ran from the dining room (no longer there,but just below the steps from the back door (this is were the bugler stood to marshall the troops?)nearly all the way down to what we used to call "the hole in the wall" which is still there now but they place the dustbins now in this area.You had to be either foolhardy or brave to slide the total way,this was were I cut my earhole open falling off!!As you slid down the slide,if you got to the end? you stopped yourself by crashing into the "Rec" hut,this was were the band practiced in the winter and instruments were stored there (a large wooden shed,were in early times you also got your haircut)so perhaps visitors long after we had gone continued the ritual..I would like to think so? If you look on the second bridge you can also see were the boys carved their names in the sandstone coping, Gordon Hughes,one of the Hill brothers,the punishment for this would be six of the best,if you were so "stupid" to put your own name? I think they were put their after they left when they re-visited the school,or perhaps some one you wern't keen on when they was at the school possibly.The hole in the wall was were we passed through to go to school (now a car park for the houses of today as you pass the second bridge and stay to the left as you walk up the hill to the hole in the wall.People say "everybody remembers were you was when Kennedy was shot" Well this is where I was and the headmaster Mr Wheatley cancelled our friday night dance as a mark of respect 1963..many thanks once more to you all for recalling "Goldings" Dave.


Reply ID 50842

23/03/2008 by Rooster

A friend who lives in Aylesbury is married to an ex Goldings boy. I will pass her the link. Good work, by the way. I found it extremely interesting.


Reply ID 50843

23/03/2008 by Montaigne

I worked at Goldings from 1986 to 1995. As I still live in Hertford, I sometimes run through the estate, gaining access through Broad Oak End. Although the field appears to be fenced off when you pass through the gate at the end of the lane, there is an exit/stile at the end of the curving footpath that gets you into the housing 'estate'. This field was where the cricket pitch used to be, but there's only the remnants of a couple of benches there now. I always exit through the path to the right of the bridge on the way out as the gate is often closed; this leads to North Road. I've frequently run around the house and have never been told to leave. In fact, one resident was keen to speak to me about the history of the house and said that he was happy for people to walk around the land. There must still be footpaths and/or rights of way on the site. A chap named John Barnes used to be the one to ask about such things as this. Anyone know if he is still active in this area?


Reply ID 50846

24/03/2008 by dennismoore

Soon after the site was sold I was confronted by a security guard and dog whilst walking there and told to leave because there was no longer public access. Off putting to say the least. We enjoyed a family walk there the other day (Thanks for the good advice Andrew) and happily it does seem to be completely open once again!


Reply ID 50849

24/03/2008 by Dave

There is a public right of way starting at the top of Goldings Lane.There is a recently built stile to the left,this skirts round past our now defunct hard tennis courts and swimming pool.Turn right by the second bridge,up the hill past our now since gone school block which was to the right,near the top of the hill just in front of our former print shop(once were stables,castellated roof line)Below this,half way up the hill to the right what look like terraced houses was our gym(if you look closely you can see the herring bone pattern in the brickwork,above that in the same block was the carpenters shop with steps up to double doors,this is were we unloaded the timber for the shop.Wych Elm Cottage was the Chaplains house(Mr Nixon)Beyond the carpenters shop,now occupied by garages and houses was our Greenhouses,and Allotments which supplied the majority of fresh food along with the orchards in the same area for fruit.This was the area you were sent to after "Lights Out" 9'o'clock by senior boys(aged about 16)we were only 12-13 years of age,wet behind the ears,and we were expected to gather fruit illegally on their behalf, this was a punishable offence by the cane if caught, but the first option was the most frightening to encounter,this pushed the second option into the background at the time,the term was "Scrumping",as we were termed a "spare" which came from a very early period in life of the school when there wasn't enough places in the school for you to learn,so you spent all the day wandering round the school grounds!until a place became available.To the left past the remains of the previous Mansion,this was our bottom field(in the early days of Abel-Smith was part of the river)This was considered sacred ground,which held our Cricket Match's and a Running Track round the outside(look on our history page) http://www.goldings.org You are still on a public right of way!. Carry on past bottom field,now to your right was our Chapel,now converted to a house which incorporates the partly hdden house close by.This Chapel we marched round to twice every Sunday for prayer...compulsory!!. They have now installed a new right of way which pass's round the Chapel? and brings you out by our "Top Field" which once had six football pitch's,one for each school house (look on our site Houses) http://www.goldings.org .To the rear of the stable,if you turn 180 degrees from looking at the stable this was the quarry were we spent many a happy hour(not much television them days!)Enjoy your walk,because I still do!...Dave.


Reply ID 50851

24/03/2008 by James007

Very intersesting reading Dave. What's your take on the youth of Hertford today?


Reply ID 50852

24/03/2008 by Admin

quote:
Originally posted by James007
Very intersesting reading Dave. What's your take on the youth of Hertford today?
With respect, please do not encourage members to post off-topic [:)]


Reply ID 50853

24/03/2008 by Jaycee

quote:
Originally posted by Admin
quote:
Originally posted by James007
Very intersesting reading Dave. What's your take on the youth of Hertford today?
With respect, please do not encourage members to post off-topic [:)]
[img]http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sign/sign0027.gif[/img]


Reply ID 50955

28/03/2008 by Dave

quote:
Originally posted by Jaycee
quote:
Originally posted by Admin
quote:
Originally posted by James007
Very intersesting reading Dave. What's your take on the youth of Hertford today?
With respect, please do not encourage members to post off-topic [:)]
[img]http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sign/sign0027.gif[/img]


Reply ID 50956

28/03/2008 by Dave

Hi this is number 8 what a time trying to get on this site, As you can tell we all had numbers at goldings, And Somerset started from 1 to 40, One of Somerset hard core we lived and die together, All for one and one for all, The brother hood 8.


Reply ID 50973

29/03/2008 by Dave

The last message was from my very good friend Bob, who is working in the Caribbean displaying to the local tradesmen out there the fine skills he was taught at Goldings,and is in very popular demand due to his training.He refers to the number we were allocated when we arrived at Goldings, which followed you throughout your time there, mine was 22, Bob was number 8. We were both taught Carpentry and Joinery at Goldings which Bob still continues to this day, along with many other skills he has learnt that supplements his fine building work. We were both in the same house (the school had a house system)Somerset, along with in our days there, Aberdeen, Cairns, Pelham, and MacAndrew.These were usually the surnames of benefactors to Goldings or Barnardos, or on the commitee of Barnardos. Many of the older boys still reject the dropping of Dr, and to this day insist that it is still used in there presence, I think they call it progress? Both me and Bob were House Captains of Somerset usually this was given to you 3-4 months before we left Goldings to encourage respect and responsibilty, and to not loose the school down when we entered the "Real World" The majority I think enjoyed their time there, and respect the work carried out on there behalf. Without entering the debate on todays youth, I feel there is a need for a similar school even today, but with all due repects...I am a little slightly biased!Many thanks to you all for taking an interest in my former home..Dave,and Bob.


Reply ID 51013

31/03/2008 by Dave

Hi 22 this is number 8, well the weather out here is nice and warm, of what l have seen on the tv bbcnews looks like you had some snow rember the good time in the snow, dont see any of that now days just the old sun by the way my Mr T Nutter help me in my carpentry in the carpenter shop if any one know the where abouts of the Mr Nutter family l would like to know and thank them for what Mr Nutter did for me showing me how to do carpentry this is number 8 signing out till the next time so 22 take care 8[8D]


Reply ID 51016

31/03/2008 by Admin

Please do not allow other people to post using your registration.


Reply ID 51017

31/03/2008 by Dave

just for you admin as l have said before l have been trying to get on this site l filled out the online register only to find some thing when wrong mybe if you check you may see that l did try so if you can help me my email is coopermccavalier@hotmail.com thank you admin number 8 and as dave said its bob from the brother hood [8D] and if l dont hear from you admin [:(!]


Reply ID 51020

31/03/2008 by Admin

Please see our Terms and Conditions, specifically the paragraph at the bottom regarding Hotmail addresses [:)]


Reply ID 51118

02/04/2008 by Dave

l had a phone call from bob in the BAHAMAS saying he had a email from our admin [V] which he said thank you for the reply. Because he is on hotmail it want let him in. Is it because he is in the BAHAMAS or is it because he is black and also is it right that they are going to build in the bottom field to over look birds island you [8)] dave


Reply ID 52818

07/06/2008 by Dave

Can anyone help me further,Herts Training School was also somewere in Hertford.One of the locals indicated that it was at the back of Hartham Common,and also beleive there was another home for children in Hertford.Some of the old boys tell me there was also a Barnardo home in Bayfordbury?Can any of you help me with this information,as we regular played Herts at football and boxing and tended to compete in sports quite a lot. Many thanks Dave Blower Goldings 1962-65


Reply ID 52819

07/06/2008 by buzz

I believe Herts Training School later became Crouchfields, just outside of Bengeo. At one time they were virtually self sufficent as they had a large farm there. It was basically an establishment for naughty lads. It is now an housing development


Reply ID 52820

07/06/2008 by Marilyn

Herts training school was indeed whare the Crouchfields development now is, it was built mid 1800's There was also Danesbury School in Warren Park Road same side as Duncombe but further up where the newish large houses now are can't remember what they call them. Not forgetting Kingsmead in the old workhouse Ware Road where the recently vacated police station is.


Reply ID 52826

07/06/2008 by Leo Densian

It was an 'Approved School' which closed in 1982 - my dad worked there. Unfortunately the approved school system fell out of favour with the powers that be in the late 70's and 80's - a misguided decision IMO. There is a book about the place written by Dorothy Abel Smith: [url]http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/displayProductDetails.do?sku=6191431[/url] The author will also be talking on the same subject at Hertford museum on 16th September.


Reply ID 53036

21/06/2008 by Dave

Just for interest,Wimbledon starts this Monday,and from 1946-66 "Goldings Boys" were the "Ball Boys" for the two weeks it was on.After many weeks of training,just 60 were selected out of 200 boys for the privlege of being a "Ball Boy" and the many boys that were disappointed like me that never went.The selection was done by the Rev B.Nixon in my time at Goldings,and your were not always picked because you were good at ball boy but regular attendance at his prayer meetings,being confirmed by him,and being a "goody goody" another reason,but at the time it was said that they represented the school and bad behaviour by boys leading up to Wimbledon would automatically exclude you! Quite a "good earner" for the boys along with Robinson Barley Water,famous players "Sweat Bands" and some boys sold autographs,and Tennis Balls used by famous players,and if my memory serves me well the Aussies were top players? I'm not sure how to put photos on your site so please visit our website and click on wimbledon http://www.goldings.org


Reply ID 53042

22/06/2008 by Muddy

Despite saying I'd have a walk round Goldings last March, I didn't get round to it until the other day. It started well, going down through Broad Oak End. The stile was obstructed by nettles, but you can open the rusty iron gate. I headed up the path immediately on your left towards the new house that looks like the one on Tracy Island in "Thunderbirds". I remember there was always a path here, but it has now been remade, you go through a gate & bear left past the fences of houses on either side. The path then bears right & you head up towards where the football pitches used to be (there are now horses grazing on that land in a paddock). The path then turns sharp left for about a quarter of a mile & then sharp right towards Waterford. Question: Can you get out to Timber Orchard here, because I took the only proper path I could find which went left through some trees & gave up after about another quarter mile. It didn't bother me, but Mrs Muddy went ballistic as we had to re-trace our steps on probably the hottest day of the year. I'm on my own again for country walks until this fiasco is forgotten, so would appreciate some guidance from anyone who regularly walks this route.


Reply ID 53884

27/07/2008 by Dave

Can anyone tell me why the wood off the London Road is called Goldings Wood Dave Goldings


Reply ID 54768

29/08/2008 by night owl

Hello to all ex Dr Barnados boys and girls,I am glad that some people found their stay there as a good thing but as an ex barnados boy myself who was in their home over at Ilford for a few years I found my stay as one of the worse experience,s of my life this was an open prison for children and through no fault of their own,we were dumped in this god awful place and were made to fight other children by the staff because they could not deal with them,my brother was dumped in Goldings after a year at Ilford and he has simular story,s but he was one of the very few who made something of him self and is now a multi millionaire and to his credit he went on to the board of directors at Barnados just to try and find out what was going on and the result of what he found out is a question, which is how many of Dr Barnados children after leaving this place went to prison and how many committed suicide? Dr Barnardos does have a good idea of the numbers but they will never be released to the public.Sorry to take off your rose coloured glasses about this place for children whose parents had died early or the child had a life threatening condition and just dumped there but to me personally this place has left me with a life time of depression, childhood is suppose to be the best time of some one,s life and should have had some one to love them but that was against Dr Barnardos rules, I am just glad this place has gone as they have pulled down most of Ilford but there are a few cottages remaining which social services use.


Reply ID 54775

29/08/2008 by Dave

Hello night owl,so sorry to hear of your experience in Barnardo's which does appear to be echoed by many of ex goldings lads before they entered goldings and is a sad reflection on barnardo's but these stories seem to disappear when they reflect there time at goldings, but no doubt out there I'm sure there are others who may disagree. If you ponder over the staff they employed they were certainly not there for the money!! Many were as I call them "bible bashers" childless couple's and control freaks!! but I can honestly say in my experience at goldings that most of the staff were there for our well being, bullying, yes by some of the boys, but I'm sure this also was carried out at "Public Schools" also. Myself I don't class myself as a barnardo child, because I entered into goldings from Walsall Social Services as beyond "Parental Control" but with a chance to learn a trade which would help me become "normal" As regards looking at barnardos through "rose tinted" glasses, I can only reflect my experience at goldings and as I saw it, and I shall always be grateful to Walsall Social Services,and Goldings which came under the umbrella of barnardo's, and as you live in Hertford pop along to our re-union and listen to the "flip side" of your terrible experience of barnardo's. I don't and never will in anyway defend barnardo's, but I will always defend my personal time spent at goldings and the many dedicated staff that helped me "back on track" but I'm sure there are many that suffered in there hands,and don't forget the many that were shipped out to the dominions as cheap labour! and the horror stories they did reflect on.Whilst being unable to extract the horror from the many minds that are out there I would just like to quote John Hunt who was at goldings and settled in Hertford untill he passed away a couple of years ago."David me and my brother were cast out by my mother into the street with a cardboard sign on our necks declaring we were now homeless and abandoned and were taken in by Barnardos, fed, clothed, and given a home what else would we have done other than survive by our wits??" The other side of the coin! Please don't assume I'm defending barnardo's I'M NOT! but there were some good people about in barnardo's. Many thanks for your opinion, take care I wish you well Dave Goldings 1962-64 and very proud I walked and lived in that sacred home of William Baker Technical College.


Reply ID 55905

14/10/2008 by Dave

As you may be aware,I am trying to trace children,grandchildren,or relative of Goldings.In my research for the book,I have come across my old Carpenter instructor Mr Herlbert Walter Tempest,who's son was baptized at Goldings Chapel 1937 by the name of Michael Stewart Tempest who was born in January 1937,and at the time lived at 20 North Road Avenue? After Goldings closed Mr Tempest senior went back to our carpenters to work for Balls Park. Another local instructor was a Mr Ron Stackwood who also was active in scouting,along with Mr N.T.Powell both print instructors along with the brothers Bill and Reg Purkis.Another local family of Hertford was Farnham who was another carpentry instructor at Goldings.A copy of the staff is displayed on this topic if anyone can help me contact them for my research and to ask the reason they joined Barnardo's along with Goldings or other stories that relate to Goldings.Many thanks to anyone that can put me in touch or relate your personal story of Goldings if you have one.Dave Goldings 1962-65.


Reply ID 56551

30/10/2008 by Dave

Can anyone tell me were the Regent Cinema was that Goldings lads visited when they had free time,usually on a Saturday,and perhaps a bit of history about it.Also a Barbers in town that they also visited around the war years,which they paid for out of there pocket money to save having it cut a Goldings! as the barber at Goldings was also a gardener! so you can guess what style he gave them!much the same as the lawns I guess Dave...Goldings.


Reply ID 56557

30/10/2008 by Leo Densian

The Regent was in Market St I think and closed during the war. Not sure which building occupies the site now though.


Reply ID 57340

19/11/2008 by Dave

Can anyone tell me how to put an old photo of Goldings on this site for interest."The Cedars of Lebanon" which were planted by the Able-Smith family and still remain in the grounds today and were maitained by our Gardening Department in the days of William Baker Technical School. If you read up on the family they travelled a lot and were responsible for the many exotic trees and plants in the grounds of Goldings as this was very popular fashion of the landed gentry of the time along with Eygptian relics.The picture in question is of our Deputy Headmaster Mr Embleton standing by the trees with his dog mid 60's,he was also head of the gardening department and was from Yorkshire,and after Goldings closed returned to Huddersfield College to continue teaching gardening,he was also responsible for the many varieties of apple trees in the grounds which some still remain today, Dave.


Reply ID 58622

31/12/2008 by Dave

I would like on behalf of Staff and Boys (once,now a long time ago)of Goldings wish you all a happy and healthy new year,and thanks for looking in Dave.


Reply ID 60239

05/02/2009 by Dave

Thinking back all those years ago Goldings would have been a hive of activity with this weather on our well renowned SLIDE! From the cherry tree down to the rec hut...not for the faint hearted! Embo in the background waiting for us to go to bed so he could tip sand on it before the morning,then getting up the next day and starting to rebuild it!I wonder if any staff secretly tried it out when we were not around? I can just see "Pop" flying down it just to show us that he enjoyed as well! Until Mr Wheatley bellowed out! "Mr Steele act your age" Did we feel the cold in 62-63 bad winter I don't recall...a lot younger then! Well got to dash off to Tesco's...for a warm! P.S. Can anyone that way, get me a picture of the snow at Goldings as we don't seem to have many.I would do it but it's 270 round trip for me. Dave


Reply ID 60253

05/02/2009 by shunt

quote:
Originally posted by Leo Densian
The Regent was in Market St I think and closed during the war. Not sure which building occupies the site now though.
I think, but am not sure, that it was behind the White Hart, accessed via what is now their courtyard/beergarden.


Reply ID 61940

22/03/2009 by Dave

When I left Goldings in April 1965 we were allowed a clothing allowance to buy a suit before we left.Unlike our school issue clothes,we were allowed to have a suit relevant to the latest fashion,drainpipe trousers,bum warmer jacket in "Silver Grey,and winkle picker shoes. The shop I seem to remember was by the bridge in Hertford,just up the road from the Castle gates on the opposite side.Does anyone remember the name of the shop? Dave.


Reply ID 63646

31/05/2009 by Dave

A extract from The Goldonian (the school magazine) printed every term. Winter term 1959 Wimbledon Fortnight A MONTH or two before the Wimbledon Amateur Tennis Championships begin, about one hundred boys train strenuously to be picked as ball-boys. The numbers are gradually whittled down to around seventy boys who are considered to be the 'cream'. The list of the courts to which the boys have been allocated goes up on the notice board a few days before the start of the Wimbledon fortnight, and there follows a mad rush to see who are on what courts. Before the actual fortnight begins we go to Wimbledon for two practice days and everyone gets excited at the thought of doing ball-boy for great tennis stars. Soon Monday comes round for the beginning of the fortnight, everyone is tense and keen but the journey in the coaches seems to take hours. When we eventually arrive at Wimbledon we all cram into the small ball-boy room and get changed, then we go up to have our dinner which is salad. This tastes scrumptious for the first few days but after a week we begin to feel like rabbits. The hands on the clock gradually creep round to a quarter to two and we all make our way to our individual courts. The players arrive and start to 'knock up' and we, the ball-boys, start our work. When we first start as ball-boys we feel very conscious of all the people watching and if we make a mistake we feel embarrassed, but soon this feeling wears off and we soon feel very much at home on the court. Many of the boys are asked which games they like best, men's, women's, doubles or singles. I think that the men's games are the more exciting because they are very fast and the placing of shots is much better, whereas the women tend to stand on the baseline and keep hitting the ball to each other until one of them hits out or into the net. Both men's, women's, and mixed doubles are always fast and exciting to watch. A popular male player among the boys this year was Rod Laver, a very fine player (although unseeded) from Australia who did well in the men's singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. His partner in the latter was Miss Darlene Hard who was one of the most popular female players among the boys. As the players get eliminated from the championships so less courts are needed and fewer boys are required each day, until the last two days when only the Centre, Number 1, and a couple of outside courts require manning. These last two days are the most exciting for the ball-boys who are left, as the semi-finals and finals are then played. The best of all the finals I think was the men's doubles when R. Emerson and N. Fraser beat R. Mark and R. Laver, all of whom were Australian. And so Wimbledon is over and a tired group of boys make their last journey home for another year, but before we know where we are we shall be training with boys who have been before and new boys, all who will be trying to get to Wimbledon next year. D. HILTON and A. KNIGHT


Reply ID 63647

31/05/2009 by Dave

THE GOLDONIAN Wimbledon Winter 1954 FOREWORD Any lawn tennis players I ask always tell me that Wimbledon is the greatest tournament in the world; not only because the best players come to it, but because it is the most enjoyable to play in. The atmosphere is just right. Everything is done for the competitors that can be, from the special twenty-four hour laundry service to the restaurant, bar and roof garden set aside for them—a refuge to which the Press or public may not penetrate. Everything is done, too, to make things as enjoyable as possible for the spectator—in fact Wimbledon is as near perfection as any sporting event could be. So you can understand why, although it is an extremely exhausting fortnight for me, I always enjoy the Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Club more than any other fortnight of the year. One of the services which does most to contribute to the comfort of the players—and to the aesthetic pleasure of the onlooker— is that given by the ball-boys who come from your school. I often think that their's is the best performance to be seen on the Centre Court; it is certainly more free from mistakes than any other! Such a high standard as your boys set can only be achieved by practice, discipline and great keenness. If you have the same attitude to whatever you decide to do when you leave school, I am sure you will succeed and, in so doing, will probably give as much pleasure as you do at Wimbledon. I'm very glad to have been asked .to write this foreword, so that I can say to you what I have often said on the air about you, "Well done!". And now I'd like to wish you all a very happy Christmas and New Year, and I'll look forward to seeing some of you again at next Wimbledon. MAX ROBERTSON Max Robertson is the well-known commentator and interviewer on the B.B.C. Radio and Television service. He is known best to our ball boys for his commentaries on the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis championships. Footnote- Not only were school ball boys for Wimbledon from 1946-66 they were also offered the the chance to be ball boys in the Davis Cup in the U.S.A., but this was declined by Mr Wheatley (The Headmaster) as he viewed it as being to much of a privledge for a small number of boys against the other boys who wouldn't have had the same chance and may have affected the morale of the school, but none the less was very proud for the offer. Dave


Reply ID 64162

18/06/2009 by Dave

Forty of our boys recently enjoyed the unique experience of acting as ball boys in the Wimbledon Tennis Tournament.They earned a reputation for keeness and inteligent alertness on the courts,and so reflected great credit to the school.Barnardo and Goldings Newsletter 1946.Dave


Reply ID 65063

12/07/2009 by Dave

Recollections of Hertford and Goldings 1934 On Sunday, 1st October, the School attended the Harvest Festival Service held at 'All Saints' Church, Hertford, in the evening. The Governor gave the morning address at All Saints' Church. A few weeks ago, the Hertford Fire Brigade came to Goldings and gave us a demonstration of fire-fighting. The speed with which they fixed the hose pipes to the Hydrants and then played them upon the building excited the admiration of the whole School. The admirable captain of the " Fire-fighters," then demonstrated how to jump from a high building into a "canvas." He perched himself perilously on the edge of the roof of the Dining Hall, (Sadly now knocked down)about 10 feet high, and jumped into the waiting canvas! One or two of our boys, ennobled by this reckless daring, endeavoured to emulate the " Captain of the Brigade." Altogether a jolly evening. (another example of the kindness shown to us by Hertford people) We offer Miss Hammond, who was a member of the Staff at Goldings, our best wishes, in her new position at Bengeo. (does anyone know this lady or present day family) The School attended the Armistice Day service on the Saturday, which was held as usual at the Hertford War Memorial. On Monday, 27th November, the boys and staff went to the evening performance of "The Belle of New York " at the County Cinema. The Hertford Dramatic and Operatic Society were the performers and everyone enjoyed a first-rate show. (another example of support from Hertford towards Goldings) We deeply regret to record the death of Leslie Joyce, a member, of Aberdeen and a comparatively new boy to Goldings. A memorial service was held in the School Chapel, the whole School attending. (one of the 16 boys that we know to, who passed away at Goldings. For more information on this story go to http://www.goldings.org History Pages "The boys who never left Goldings".


Reply ID 65538

26/07/2009 by Dave

An extract from "The Goldonian" (The School Magazine Winter 1964 ) An address to the School from the then Mayor of Hertford. The Mayor of Hertford, Councillor A. W. Bentley, then presented the prizes and certificates to the boys and apprentices as listed below. Having completed the easy part of his task, the Mayor then said a few well-chosen words, stating how sorry he was that events had put him in the spot to do the talking, when he was hoping to have listened to the words of wisdom from Mr. Tucker. Mr. Bentley said that when he first came to Hertford 14 years ago some of the first sounds he heard were our bugle calls, and after inquiry was told of our School. He also said that it was the opinion of some members of the community that Goldings was NOT an asset to the town. However, Mr. Bentley considered that we were now a great credit to the community of Hertford, and this was due to the work of the Headmaster and staff. Addressing the boys, Mr. Bentley said that life does not end when you leave Goldings, and that in some respects our boys have an advantage over their contemporaries who have to make up their minds what they are going to do before they leave school. Other advantages were that they live in a friendly atmosphere, are not shut off in one little community, and are able to mix with other boys from all over the country, and that they are trained for their future life, seeing how their companions are being trained in their particular trade. Finally, Mr. Bentley expressed his hope that, all boys would remember their Christian teaching and carry on mixing in a Christian community. Before the final hymn and blessing, given by the Padre, the Reverend B. Nixon, Mr. L. Embleton, our Deputy Headmaster, proposed a vote of thanks to Mr. Bentley, and felt sure that his words of advice could be well heeded and that our boys should realize what wonderful opportunities they have before it is too late. Afterwards staff and visitors adjourned to the staff room for tea. GENERAL SUBJECTS Juniors Science and Mathematics: FREDERICK WORKMAN Art and Technical Drawing: DAVID BLOWER English: VICTOR ROWLANDS Religious Instruction: DAVID TATE Best Progress: RALPH SMITH Physical Training: ROBERT HENDRY Seniors General Standard: DEREK HAMMOND Best Progress: GORDON HUGHES Physical Training: DAVID LANGLER SHOEMAKING AND REPAIRING Seniors: MICHAEL BUTT GORDON FLETCHER CARPENTRY Junior: DAVID ENNIS Senior A: ROBERT BUXTON Senior B: ROGER PORTER Senior C: FRANK IORNS


Reply ID 65700

01/08/2009 by Dave

2 COY., 1st "C" BATTALION, HERTFORDSHIRE REGIMENT BAND NOTES These notes start with a word of regret for owing to pressure of business, etc., our excellent and most patient Band instructor, Lieut. H. Walkling has had to resign from the Army Cadet Force, and 30 we have lost the valuable services of an untiring worker for the Band. It is through the efforts of Lieut. Walkling that we have reached such a high standard and have become well known in many places. Thanks for all he has done for us in the past and we will do our utmost to carry on the same high standard. We had our first engagement of the year when the Band gave a display on the 7th January at the works of Messrs. John Wright and Sons, Mile End, London. The Band was greatly appreciated and the boys made many friends amongst the wonters. We were grieved to learn of the death of His Majesty the King on the 6th February, and we joined in our expression of loyalty to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth on Saturday, 9th February, when S/Sgt. Warren and Sgt. Fox were selected to play a fanfare and the Royal Salute at the proclamation ceremony in Hertford. Both these lads performed their duties with great credit and a letter from the Mayor was received in appreciation of their services. On the 22nd February S/Sgt. Warren and Cadet Thompson attended the funeral of the late Dr. Wells of Roydon who was a prominent member of the British Legion in that area. The boys sounded the Last Post and the Reveille at the graveside and again performed their sad duties most efficiently. THE "GOLDONIAN" (school magazine)SPRING 1952


Reply ID 65983

10/08/2009 by Dave

A tribute to one of the Staff from the Goldonian Magazine No. 3 of our Personality Series is Mr. Harold DeBoeck. The name of DeBoeck has been ssociated with the Homes for nearly 70 years, as Mr. DeBoeck's father was in charge of the Sheet-metal department, both at Stepney and at Goldings for close on forty years before his retirement in 1931, and his brother was also at one time a Superintendent of a Barnardo "Ever-open-Door". Mr. DeBoeck is the last of the three members of staff still at Goldings who came down to the School from Stepney in 1921. At that time he was assistant to his father and took over the headship of the Sheet-metal Work Department when his father retired. Unfortunately soon after coming to Goldings Mr. DeBoeck met with an accident on the football field whilst playing against Hertford Heath. Playing in goal he went down to scoop up the ball from an oncoming forward and sustained an injury to his right hand. At the time it did not appear to be a serious injury, but alas it meant a very long time in hospital for him with the final result he lost the use of his right hand. For some time it was thought Mr. DeBoeck would never be able to return to his work in the Sheet-metal Shop, but fortunately Mr. DeBoeck thought otherwise and by sheer determination and perseverance he showed us that what his right hand was now incapable of doing, his left hand would have to be his right and left hands in one. Not only has he been able to continue at his trade with remarkable success, but he also taught himself to write (with his left hand and even to play billiards and snooker. In this latter sphere he became a much better player than some of his contempories who had the advantage of both hands. Mr. deBoeck has given yeoman service to the School and many boys who have done well after leaving the School at their trade taught to them by Mr. DeBoeck have acknowledged they owed much to his teaching. J. M. Goldonian Spring 1958


Reply ID 66116

16/08/2009 by Dave

GOLDINGS FOOTPATH One of the many proposals published in the Society's "Green fingers Report" was to establish a footpath through the wood on the Goldings estate lying to the west of the A 602 road to Stevenage. Approaches were made to the Herts. County Council, owners of the estate, and our early discussions were very friendly and helpful. The line of the path agreed was from a point just beyond the second bridge (after the Bramfield Rd turning, going north from Hertford), proceeding through the wood into the Goldings drive, along the drive for 150 yards and then veering right across the field into Waterford by the church. Our proposal was approved by the County Highways Committee and a working party was organised to open up the path through the wood. Practical details were discussed with the Council's Countryside officers, Mr Peter Lawrence and Mr Richard Brown, who very kindly provided the tools for the job. Twelve of us met "on site" on a fine Sunday morning in April. We cleared the way through the wood and dug the necessary hole for a stile by lunch time. The stile was erected by Mr Brown and his voluntary helper. The path is now available for use and we must record our grateful thanks to the County Council and all the officers concerned for the ready cooperation in achieving one of our Green fingers objectives. It must be emphasised that the path is not a public one and should be regarded as a "permissive path" by courtesy of the council. It is a most pleasant walk with glimpses of the River through the trees. 1978.


Reply ID 66117

16/08/2009 by Dave

GOLDINGS IN THE PAST The name Goldings can be traced back to, John Goldyng who is known from the Lay Subsidy Rolls to have lived in the area in 1296. The house which stood on the site until the late 19th Century was probably built around the l680's by Humphrey Hall who died there in 1695. It remained in the possession of his family for some years, and in the marriage settlment of Thomas Hall in 1727 it was described as a "capital messuage and farm". In the sale particulars of 1770, when the whole estate was sold, the property was described as a "large and elegant mansion~house built on arches with three fronts and a farm of 210 acres". "The situation of the mansion is upon a gentle eminence," the sale particulars go on, "Before it lies a beautiful vale enriched with a serpentine river, fed by a trout stream, called Beneficial River. The lands are happily varied, the hills are adorned with dropping woods and the town of Hertford perfects this pleasure-giving view." The house was adjoined by a garden and meadows. No park existed, but the particulars suggest that the farm could be converted into one. In 1822, Goldings was sold to Richard Emmott by the executors of Samuel George Smith, He died in 1863 and the house passed to his nephew Robert, who ordered it to be demolished and rebuilt on the present site between 1871 and 1877. According to the county historian Cussans, the original site was damp" and exposed to mists from the river. The architect of the new house built in red brick in a neo-Tudor style was George Devey. Robert Abel Smith died in 1894 leaving a son Reginald, who sold Gold ings to Dr Barnardo's Homes in 1921. The chapel was added in 1923 when the architect was Walter Godfrey of Wratton and Godfrey, successors to Devey. Later, the property was sold to Herts County Council and since 1969 it has been occupied by the Highways Department.


Reply ID 66216

20/08/2009 by Woody

quote:
Originally posted by Dave
GOLDINGS FOOTPATH . . . It must be emphasised that the path is not a public one and should be regarded as a "permissive path" by courtesy of the council. It is a most pleasant walk with glimpses of the River through the trees. 1978.
The path through the woods remains, Dave. There are some dirt-bike jumps added in recent times within the woods, though I doubt that these are permissive. [;)]


Reply ID 66466

28/08/2009 by Dave

A MASTER GOES TO THE FILMS During September a number of our boys were invited to Pinewood Studios to act as "extras" in a film production. To the laymen this may sound a glamorous and exciting experience, but actually film-making is a slow and tedious business. Many hours are spent in preparing a shot which often lasts only a minute in actual film time. However, the boys played their parts in more senses than one. They were always ready for yet another rehearsal, and waited patiently sometimes all day, for that elusive sun. But perhaps the presence of stars compensated us for the absence of sun. Michael Redgrave was as impressive in reality as he is on celluloid. Jean Kent, W. Hyde White and Nigel Patrick were supporting stars, but glittered none the less. Impressive, too, were the sets. One had an uncanny feeling of actually being in a school, until such things as arc lamps, cables and cameras recalled you to the reality of a make-believe world. How many boys will remember, when they actually see the film, those rubber cobble stones, the plaster rocks, the entrance to the cricket pavilion that led them into an open field! Not many, I am sure! That is the magic of films. On the whole I think the boys did a grand job, and who knows?, "The Browning Version" may yet be known as "The Goldings Classic". Winter 1950


Reply ID 66534

01/09/2009 by Dave

The WILLIAM BAKER TECHNICAL SCHOOL, GOLDINGS, HERTFORD, a Barnardo home tucked in to 100 acres of grounds by the village of Waterford. Who can recall this wonderful school for Barnardo boys, and a credit to Barnardo’s for their forward thinking that helped teach the boys a trade that would help them climb the ladder of success which many of them didn’t experience until they became a “Goldings Boy” The school compared to others didn’t have a very long life 1922-1967, but it’s name is still recalled today, not only by the “Boys” but also by former staff with fond memories, and also people who were aware of it’s presence in the community. Since 1958 and unofficially before, the school has held it’s annual reunion back in their adopted town of Hertford, every year without fail, and many travel from the Commonwealth to be among the many friends they made when they lived at “Goldings” who after Goldings emigrated. This idea of a reunion was the brainchild of Mr Wheatley who suggested the first Saturday in October. Mr Wheatley was our headmaster from 1945-66, shortly before the school closed, and must be credited with the many improvements to the school and innovations that are still to this day reborn as modern ideas! Along with his loyal staff, and mostly were local people, many successes were achieved. Many of the boys remained in Hertford and married local girls, so if you were once a “Goldings Boy” or you are in touch with any of them please mention our forth coming reunion for this year which will be held at Sele Farm Community Centre, Perret Gardens, Longwood Road, Hertford, SG14 2LW, anyone is welcome who holds an interest in Goldings, or Barnardo children, and admission is free. On the day we display many images of Goldings and surrounding area’s from yesteryear that many will find interesting to recall. We have through Helen Gurney, Hertford Museum had wonderful support with this project, and this year we will be once again supported by the Mayor and Mayoress of Hertford who will be in attendance at our reunion. If you require further information, please visit our web site http://www.goldings.org or contact me on 01922 615789 Dave Blower, many thanks for taking the time to read this letter.


Reply ID 66541

01/09/2009 by exiled_in_Reading

I was interested to note the Goldings chapel recently sold in June 2009 for 3.4 mill...


Reply ID 66545

01/09/2009 by Leo Densian

quote:
Originally posted by exiled_in_Reading
I was interested to note the Goldings chapel recently sold in June 2009 for 3.4 mill...
Fair old reduction then - it started at £4.2m as I recall


Reply ID 66546

01/09/2009 by exiled_in_Reading

quote:
Originally posted by Leo Densian
quote:
Originally posted by exiled_in_Reading
I was interested to note the Goldings chapel recently sold in June 2009 for 3.4 mill...
Fair old reduction then - it started at £4.2m as I recall
4.5 actually http://property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/property/buying_and_selling/article2785272.ece


Reply ID 66786

09/09/2009 by Dave

LETTER OF APPRECIATION THE HEADMASTER received the following letter of appreciation from Mr. Bassett, father of Tony and John, who both set such a fine example of how to make the best of the facilities available to boys who come to this School. Dear Sir, I am writing to you to express my thanks to you, and all of your staff for the education my two boys received while being at your school, and amongst other things the kindness, care and thought which everyone of you have showed towards them. I shall always be grateful to you, also my thoughts will always be with you. May God bless you and help you to carry on the good work so that other children may benefit from your school. Once again my thanks from the bottom of my heart. Yours very truly, (signed) J. Bassett


Reply ID 67181

22/09/2009 by Dave

School Goldonian Booklet 1935 FEAST NIGHT ON 21st December, the whole School assembled in the gymnasium for the purpose of witnessing an entertainment given by members of the Staff and friends. This "night of nights" is usually termed "Feast Night," which is held to celebrate the approach of the Christmas holidays and the half-termly respite from Night School. As the boys, Staff, and their wives and families, filed into the gymnasium, two "whackers-out" gave each person a large bag of sweets and some nuts and oranges—probably given as an inducement to the recipients to refrain from giving vent. to their feelings during the performance! The School Prefects, assisted by Mr. Culver, gave us several very amusing and interesting short sketches, which were received most favourably by an appreciative audience. These sketches lasted for about an hour and a half. Then came an interval for refreshments, which were also favourably received! Then we were entertained by members of the Staff and their friends in a "snappy" revue entitled, 'The New Broadcasting Station at Sleepyville." It would be invidious were I to mention any particular member of the company as being outstanding. Each one of them was excellent in his particular part; each turn "put over the air" received great applause, and some of the items were really very amusing. We were indebted to Mr. Mitchell and his collaborator, Mr. Hemming, for writing and producing such an amusing farce. Everyone present voted it one of the most enjoyable evenings spent at Goldings.


Reply ID 67202

23/09/2009 by Loving Whale

Acquired by one Theo Walcott

quote:
Originally posted by exiled_in_Reading
quote:
Originally posted by Leo Densian
quote:
Originally posted by exiled_in_Reading
I was interested to note the Goldings chapel recently sold in June 2009 for 3.4 mill...
Fair old reduction then - it started at £4.2m as I recall
4.5 actually http://property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/property/buying_and_selling/article2785272.ece


Reply ID 67205

23/09/2009 by Victor Meldrew

I wonder if he will be poping down the Millstream with Les and Pete for a pint?


Reply ID 68780

30/10/2009 by Dave

HALLOWE'EN AND HOGMANAY As I watched the children's faces shining in the bonfire's blaze on 5th November, I thought back on my own childhood in Scotland. But at this time of year (31st October actually), we used to celebrate, not Gunpowder Plot, but Hallowe'en, or the eve All Hallow. Naturally we looked forward to the occasion and prepared well in advance. We made false faces and fancy dresses, and lanterns from hollowed-out turnips. We brushed up our "party piecess" Which we would sing or recite to our friends and parents to earn the traditional apple or penny. But the climax was our Hallowe'en party, and what a time we had. Our large kitchen was cleared, a big tin bath was produced and filled with water, and lots of red, juicy apples were dropped in. They were given a good "swirl" and then the age-old "dookin for apples" began. We each tried in turn to fork an apple or to lift one out of the bath by biting it and holding it between our teeth. Then we jumped to bite the "treacle scone" suspended almost out of reach, or dug our spoons into the tub of mashed potatoes, hoping that we should be lucky enough to find a silver coin. The party ended, as always, with our turning off the lights, lighting our home-made lanterns and drawing up our chairs to listen to eerie ghost stories in the flickering firelight—always a little bit afraid of the shadows outside our half-circle. After Hallowe'en we began to think of Christmas, and, as I became older, of New Year's Eve, or Hogmany as we call it. I have always regretted that few people seem to keep Hogmany in the south, and as December draws on I always long to be back with my "ain folk". And what preparations we make — a roaring fire, a drink for everyone, cakes, shortbread, sandwiches, fruit and nuts. As the evening of 31st December wears on we excitedly await the return of all the family, and each member makes a point of being home before midnight. Then as the clock strikes twelve, as the bells ring out, and as the hooters from the ships are sounding, we open the windows to allow the spirit of the Old Year to escape and to receive the spirit of the New, and with a handshake for everyone, we wish each other a "Guid New Year" and toast our absent friends. After that we wait for our "First foot", hoping that he will be dark-headed and that he will not forget the traditional lump of coal which will bring good luck to the house. Then there is dancing and singing and not until the "wee sma' hours" do we retire to bed, very tired but very happy — Hogmany is over for another year. MARY HASWELL Goldonian Winter 1956


Reply ID 69008

06/11/2009 by Dave

Goldings Armistice Day 1956 CADETS 2 COY., 1st "C" BATTALION HERTFORDSHIRE REGIMENT BAND NOTES The Band attended the Battle of Britain Parade at Hornchurch and Ilford on the 16th September and did very well. Our Drum-Major Henry Peete, was in good form. We attended the Harvest Festival Service at Christ's Church, Port Vale, and the Band played the School there and back, also the Band led the School on Parade to the Hertford Baptist Church on Sunday, 28th October. The buglers also attended services at Wheathampstead, Roydon, Harlow, Datchworth, Stapleford, Port Vale and Hertford on Remembrance Day. This is always a busy time for the Band but they always of their best. A. P. CULVER, Captain O.i.C. Training Officer for O.C. 2 Coy.


Reply ID 69095

09/11/2009 by Dave

One of my many dear old friends from Goldings has reminded me of the sacrifice paid by Goldings Boys and Staff who gave their lives in conflicts around the world for their country. And as he says we should pay our respect to this fact, so Tony Angell has had a wreath made and was at Waterford Cenotaph yesterday at 11'o' clock to present the wreath on our behalf. Can I just remind every one that when we became the new residents to Goldings a wreath was laid at Hertford’s Cenotaph in 1922 for the same reasons and included the many Barnardo boys and girls along with Staff who also paid the supreme sacrifice, not forgetting the Canadians, Australians, and Barnardo children around the world who gave the same sacrifice. So just for a moment, pause to remember. Well-done Tony Angell Somerset 62-64 on all of our behalf Footnote- Mr Battell, a very popular member of staff was killed by the clock tower in the early part of the Second World War as he made his way to the main house to make sure the boys were safe in a bombing raid, and is buried in Waterford Church.


Reply ID 69319

15/11/2009 by Dave

When we was at Goldings in the majority of case's we were taught a trade,schooled,competed in indoor and outdoor activities.When we came to leave we were clapped in assembly,given a set of tools free,relevant to our trade,and a suitcase with all the basic essentials required for the outside world,and I don't know about anyone else but my progress was closely followed long after I had left by Mr Wheatley (unknown to me until I collected my records)The years!1960's Forward to November 2009,latest rules introduced by the Government and I quote "Ed Balls the Childrens Secretary has been drawn to the attention that children leaving care are Leaving Care Home's with just a bin bag!As part of a string of reforms all the children will be given help to find a job!with offers of apprenticeships and career advice.They are designed to give a better chance to 6000 teenagers leaving care. Were is the modern day Mr Wheatley and a group of loyal and caring staff as we once had. Who was it who said "We are shutting Goldings as it is past it's sell date!" Well New Labour! and politicians of any party get in touch because we may help you understand! Why can't some problems be solved by looking back!


Reply ID 69370

16/11/2009 by Dave

Announced on the news today! Australia apologise to all the children who were sent (usually against their will) by care agency's (there’s one I can name) to Australia who were also abused in more ways than one and told in some instances that they had no family! Well-done Australia, now for Britain and the care agency's to offer their apologies after 40 years. There is a book available which tells some of the harrowing stories that these children suffered, and no doubt there are many more.


Reply ID 69869

28/11/2009 by Dave

Goldonian Summer 1959 Runners-tip! A team of nine senior apprentices and one member of staff from our Printing department took part in a games tournament at Hertford on Friday, 6th March, 1959, and from a total entry of six teams were only very narrowly outpointed into second place. The tournament—known as the Ditton Cup Tournament—is organised annually by the Hertford Typographical Society, which is the branch of the trade association of the journeymen and apprentices of the printing firms in the Hertford area, and is a competition between members of each firm—known in the trade as "Chapels"—in which members in pairs play each other at billiards, darts, dominoes, crib and shove-ha'penny. The winning team—this year the Simson Shand Chapel—hold a really magnificent silver cup for one year. Because of the difference in numbers representing each Chapel the points awarded for each game are worked out on an average for each pair and the difference this year between the winners and the Goldings team was only .2—6.6 and 6.4. G.M.


Reply ID 70223

13/12/2009 by Dave

CHRISTMAS-TIDE AT GOLDINGS 1936 THE festive season at Goldings was ushered in on Sunday evening, 22nd December, when the choir sung appropriate carols, very well rendered, and the Governor read the immortal story of "Scrooge," which was listened to with wrapt attention by the School. On Monday evening, 23rd December, we had a great disappointment, we were looking forward to a concert by some friends from London, but owing to wide-spread thick fog and ice-covered roads, they were unable to reach us; we look forward, however, to greeting them on some future occasion. Tuesday, Christmas Eve, we bid God-speed to 92 of our fellows who set off on leave to visit relatives and friends and it was inspiring to see their happy faces and judging from the extra anointing they had given to their heads (in flavours various), by the time they reached their villages, the inhabitants thereof would lift up their faces and fancy that spring was in the (h)air and would smell them coming before they saw them. Our fervent wish for them was, that they all would have as jolly a time as we intended to have at Goldings. Christmas morning broke to the strains of "Christians, awake! " kindly rendered by early rising members of our Band and it was much appreciated as they played jolly well. What more fitting for commencing such a day, as to gather round our Lord's Table where quite a nice number of boys and members of the Staff met in remembrance and thanksgiving for God's great gift to all men. At 10.30 a.m. the school met together to join in the Christmas Morning service in the Chapel. Well-known Christmas hymns were sung most heartily by all. The Governor in his sermon, referred to "God's unspeakable Gift" to us all, and counselled all to keep that before them during this time of happiness and the giving and receiving of gifts. Then "Christmas Dinner! !" Did one ever see legs of pork, baked potatoes, brussels-sprouts, "stuffing," pudding and custard disappear as if by magic, and yet no conjurer was there. The excitement when Father Christmas arrived, bringing in a snow-covered case, which, when opened, contained a courier from Snow Town, who handed out boxes of Joke Bombs and a special "bottle of whisky" for the Governor. The noise of squeakers and hooters when the bombs were all exploded and shot their contents all over the dining-hall, who can describe it? Later, a splendid tea. "Where do the boys put it?" someone said, and finally a great show of films during the evening, and then to bed. All summed up in a remark made by a small boy to the 'Governor, "This, Sir, has been the happiest day of my life."


Reply ID 70413

20/12/2009 by Dave

THE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 30'S GOLDINGS MANY wonderful happenings occurred at Goldings during the Christmas period. After an exciting "Feast Night," we said au revoir to the leave boys. The House Masters divided the "Leavites" into two groups (also themselves) and escorted them to Hertford East and North Stations respectively. It proved far more effective than allowing the boys to straggle any-old-how to the stations. Having safely seen the "troops" off, we returned to Goldings. We were pleased to welcome so many Old Boys, who came down for Christmas. On Christmas Day the boys had dinner at one o'clock, and what a dinner! Juicy joints of roast pork, assisted by baked potatoes, mashed "spuds," greens and gravy, followed by Christmas pudding and custard, whilst on the tables were nuts, grapes and oranges, and finally crackers. During the lull between the courses, the Governor announced that he had been able—at tremendous expense—to secure the services of the world-famous England-to-Australia Airman, "Sammy Clarke." The great "Sammy," and his famous flying "come-off-it," were carried shoulder-high into the Dining Hall, where the intrepid aviator proceeded to distribute boxes of joke bombs, and streamers. Members of the staff and their families waited on the boys at dinner, which went without a hitch. In the afternoon, a game of football was arranged between the School and the Old Boys, which the Old Boys won,. The captain of the School side attributed their defeat to "too many of the XI swallowing threepenny-bits in their plum pudding." In the evening, we assembled in the gymnasium and witnessed a very fine film called "The Big Cage." (Smith minor was very upset as he thought it was going to be "The Big Cake!") On Boxing day, the School Football XI journeyed to Braughing, and beat them by 3—1. In the evening we had more "Talkies." This time we saw Tom Mix in "The Terror Trail," which was jolly good. After the "Storm" comes the "Calm." We are now in the tranquil stage of commencing Night School and to start the New Year full of good resolutions. And all of us "must take the current when it serves, or lose our ventures."


Reply ID 70519

24/12/2009 by Dave

On the Eve of Christmas Day I would like to on behalf of "Goldings" thank the Mayor and Mayoress of Hertford,the good people of Hertford and surrounding areas,the Hertfordshire Mercury,and the many residents of the "New Goldings" that not only made our reunion so succesful,but also allowed a number of our old boys to once more tread the floors and buildings that we once lived in!and to recall our formative years spent there with the "New" residents.Many Thanks. A very Merry Christmas and a Wonderful New Year to you all. From all corners of the world..The Boys of William Baker Technical School,Goldings,1922-67


Reply ID 70631

03/01/2010 by Dave

The Outbreak of the Second World War at Goldings 1939 Those Old Boys who have not been to Goldings since War was declared, would perhaps like to know what effect the War has had on those who are still here. Apart from the first fortnight, when everybody was rushing about, filling sandbags, digging sick bay dugouts and extra trenches, life goes on much about the same. It was during this fortnight that we experienced our first air raid warning and it came in the middle of the night. This, however, proved to be a false alarm. The next alarm was-sounded when everybody could almost taste their breakfast, at 6.45 a.m. to be precise. I had the impression that the boys enjoyed this latter experience, partly due, perhaps, to the "wacking out" of chocolate in the trenches and partly due to the fact that shops did not open until 10 a.m. Whatever the reason, however, the evacuation to the trenches was a great success without a sign of panic. Now a word to those boys who one hears complaining about a War being on, when different restrictions are enforced they are for your own good and safety, so use a little more common sense, and try to assist those who are responsible for your happiness and safety. In conclusion, I extend my Heartiest greetings and the best of luck in the New Year to all the boys of Goldings.


Reply ID 71032

12/01/2010 by Dave

WINTER 1962-63 FOR A GOLDINGS BOY VERNEY NEWS IT is more than twelve months since the Painting Department moved into the Verney to give us a new and needed face lift. At long last we are almost at the end of living without carpets on the floors, brick dust in our throats, and the smell of paint. The past few weeks of snow and ice gave us a worrying time as we thought some of our newly repaired walls were going to be ruined when getting to our frozen pipes, a nightmare that lasted twenty-eight days. By the time summer is with us we should be ship-shape once again and preparing some activities. One activity which has gained renewed enthusiasm is our Tuesday night dancing class which is loyally supported by the young ladies from Balls Park Training College and Miss Josephine Sheppard and her friends. I am pleased to report that the Verney boys are still giving service in their spare time by doing telephone duty at the County Hospital. Lodgings have once again proved to be our biggest problem. The old soldiers who have returned to us through loss of digs, namely Arthur Knight and Winston Norton, are welcome guests but unfortunately are holding up young apprentices in the School. We did manage to squeeze in Glyn Parry and hope he will enjoy his stay. R. N.


Reply ID 71407

22/01/2010 by Dave

Goldonian Summer 1950 We had the honour of carrying out the annual ceremony of Beating the Retreat on Thursday, 18th May, on the Car Park, Hertford. This was watched by many of the townspeople and the Mayor, Councillor Dye, afterwards inspected the band and spoke to each Cadet personally. The Mayor complimented the band on their smart turnout and appearance and said they were a credit to the school and the battalion. On the 20th May, the band went to Thaxted to play the Morris dancers through the town and afterwards gave a display on the vicarage lawn. This is the third year that the band has carried out this duty and each year they earn the good opinion of the people of Thaxted. Saturday, 10th June, was an eagerly awaited day, when the band went to Hornchurch and took part in the Essex and District open band competition. We are proud to say that the band reached 3rd place and our Drum Major, T. Greenough, gained first place for the best Drum Major. Last year the band entered for this competition for the first time and came gth out of 40 bands. Well done Band, and well done Drum Major!


Reply ID 71409

22/01/2010 by Golden

Dave, I know Win from playing football in Hertford for many years - as a goalkeeper he stung my hands on many occasions! I also used to know a lot of the Verney boys in my younger days and they were a good bunch of lads - can't remember many names but Trevor seems to ring a bell. I grew up at Sele Farm and Goldings used to be a good playground for many of us from the estate (after you had all gone I believe) - its a lovely place and I played tennis, golf, football, cricket and fished in the grounds. Its a shame its all fenced off now but the owners have made a good job of the 'refurb'. I read your posts with interest; I know that many boys have mixed feelings about the regime but its good to know that a lot of you look back with fondness.


Reply ID 72154

22/02/2010 by Dave

One of the outstanding events in the recent history of Goldings, was the very successful show put up by our Gym. Squad, at the Annual Albert Hall F6te. Having something to do with the composition of the School Cricket and Football teams, I can readily sympathise with my friend and brother House Master, Mr. Patch (Gym. Instructor). The Gym. boys train hard and some excellent material is moulded into a team, and then, various, members, unfortunately, have to leave, creating gaps which become increasingly more difficult to fill. Another event which aroused considerable enthusiasm, was the progress our ist XI soccer team made in the Herts. Junior Cup. We reached the Divisional Semi-final, and were the lone representatives of 36 Junior Clubs from our Leagues. We lost to a senior side from the East Herts. League, to the tune of 2—4. With any luck, we should have won. The wind, which was a powerful ally to the Argos in the first half, enabled them to lead by four goals to nil. In the 2nd half, the wind dropped completely and yet we scored two goals, and came near to scoring many more. Our goalie, too, struck a real "off-day." We went down with our colours flying. "What man could do better than facing fearful odds, For the honour of his school and the temple of his gods?" (With apologies to Macaulay.) The School Inter-House Football has produced some keen games, and whilst it seems Buxton are virtually winners of the Shield, yet the runners-up cup still remains very open. The Inter-House Boxing and Cross Country Race are the next items on our Athletic Programme. I trust we shall have many entries for both events. THE EDITOR.


Reply ID 72512

09/03/2010 by Dave

DR. BARNARDO THE BEGINNING The last thing I remember of my parents is of them sending me away from home at a very early age. After this I had no alternative but to live with the "Gang". The "Gang" was a group of lads who were in the same plight as myself. We eked out a miserable existence holding horses, begging, stealing, doing odd jobs, anything for a few coppers to buy food. Our gang, about twenty of us, had our own den near the docks; it was a tarpaulin which covered a pile of packing crates. We had removed the crates in the middle and made ourselves a covering, where, at nights we could huddle together to keep warm. One of our gang, "Joey", came home one night with a new jacket, which, he said came from a man Mr. Barnardo who ran what were called the "Ragged Schools". The following night a commotion began nearby and when I scrambled out, I found Joey with a man wearing a top hat and greatcoat. He was Mr. Barnardo and I heard Joey say, "There yer are, sir, an' there's still plenty more". Behind me followed a long procession of ragged and unkempt ragamuffins who had been rooted out of their den for Mr. Barnardo to see. After that night people seemed to notice us more and we were able to collect more coppers. As I was holding a fine white mare one day I overheard one gentleman say to another, "Mr. Barnardo didn't exaggerate things cither, when he gave that talk". "No," said the other, "and I've heard tell that he had donations, for his Homes at Stepney, from several well-known families' ' . A month or so later Mr. Barnardo visited us with another gentleman and, to our surprise, asked us to come and live in proper houses. We were astounded and hesitated, then our appointed leader. Ben we called him, pointed out that we could at least try "these 'ere "omes". We all knew Ben to be a wise lad and so most of our group including myself volunteered to go. It must have been a surprising sight for passers-by seeing two coach loads of dirty, ragged boys go riding past. It was the start of a new life for me and many other boys. Although a few boys ran away, most stayed. I remained in Stepney for six years and grew up into a normal lad instead of being a ragged urchin tied down with squalor. I shall not forget meeting Dr. Barnardo. He was a great man.


Reply ID 73176

01/04/2010 by Dave

During the war years Goldings increased the boys housed there due to the evacuation of the Stepney Homes After the War, the Home Office became involved in Dr Barnardo Homes and it laid down standards which involved a reduction in the number of places at the school. Originally, rooms 1, 2 and 8 were classrooms with the boys working at various places around the grounds, such as the Stable , Block which is now Ware College Annexe. The rest of the house was devoted to residential quarters and in fact was split up into four houses, one on each floor with two on the top floor. The school could now only accommodate about 200 boys, and they could learn one of the: following trades: Printing, Carpentry, Painting and Decorating, Boot Making and Shoe repairs, Sheet Metal Working or Gardening, if they stayed to the age of 21 or else they could leave at 15. The RCT. buildings were erected around 1950 as classrooms and the above of the house then became residential; the Canteen was the Bakery. Mr Hooper took over from Mr Walker in 1953 and has been in charge of maintaining the place ever since. The McAndrew Wing was added during 1959/60 and was opened by Princess Margaret on Tuesday l8 October 1960 with a silver key. Apparently Mrs Fyfe's room was converted into a Drawing Room, for the Princess and a special toilet was built, but when the big day arrived, she did not use either of them. The school remained full, with around 200 resident boys until the shock announcement in 1966 that it was to close down. Apparently plans had been prepared to make the school more viable by building separate houses, etc, but this was costed out at £lm and must have been considered too expensive. Also there were not the number of Orphans that there used to be and this may have influenced the decision. Anon: We think this may have been a member of staff from Herts County Council who possibly worked there!


Reply ID 73660

20/04/2010 by Dave

Goldonian 1943 Barnardo Boys Prisoner-of-War Fund A WHIST DRIVE and dance was held in the Gym. in October, in aid of the Fund. There was a very large gathering of staff and friends, both for the whist drive and the dance. The Governor (the Rev. F. C. Macdonald) made a short speech, explaining the objects of the function, and Mrs. Macdonald presented the prizes. Due to the great generosity of the happy gathering, and to the very good work of the organising committee the Fund benefited by the handsome sum of £36. l0s. An Afternoon of Thrills MAJOR NOBLE paid a visit to Hertford, and very kindly spared us some of his limited time to come along and tell us of the experiences of a battalion who fought their way from Cairo to Sicily. They started their journey at the time when General Wavell was in charge of the expedition, and the large audience in the Gym. were thrilled for three quarters of an hour during which Major- Noble, by the aid of a map of the coast-line from Cairo to Tripoli (drawn on two blackboards by Mr. Tempest), drew a vivid picture of the fighting, the advances and retreats, and finally, the sea journeys to Malta and then Sicily. Three pipers enlivened the proceedings by tunes on their bagpipes, and the greatest thrill of all came when the boys were allowed to examine tommy guns and mines, which were captured from the Germans and were the trophies of the battalion. The Governor thanked Major Noble and his men for all they had done to interest us and to make us aware of the tremendous job which our forces are doing, and called for three cheers, which were very heartily rendered.


Reply ID 73735

22/04/2010 by Dave

Goldonian 1949 MY TRADE My trade, which is printing, is proving one of great interest. It is not easy and one has to be very much alert from the beginning. I am a beginner having only been in the printers since September, 1949. In the Junior room where I happen to be, we work to a formula. After several preliminaries we have to complete three specially arranged jobs, all pertaining to the elementary facts of printing. These have to be thoroughly understood before we can make any further progress. After a time we get small display jobs which prove a little more interesting. This helps us to learn the various type faces, which I can assure you are very numerous. One day a week we have theory of printing which is most essential. After completing twelve months in the Junior room, we are transferred to the Intermediate section, and finally the Senior section. Printing is a great craft and I thoroughly recommend it.


Reply ID 74269

09/05/2010 by Dave

JUST A DAY In the distance a faint yet penetrating sound pierces the wall of semi-consciousness. A bugle! Why, of course, "Reveille." With forefinger crooked, I coax back to life that part of my facial anatomy termed "eyelid," and with startling suddenness, realize that it is time I was "up and doing." By now I am fully awake; I see what a glorious morning I have awakened to. It is the sort of morning one reads about in books of life in the wide open spaces. You know the type of book I mean:—"Pushing back the flap of his tent he perceived the warm-tinted dawn flooding the horizon with rays of promised sunshine." Such a morning has dawned, and those rays of promised sunshine make one feel good to be alive. . Hastily covering the lower portion of my body with trousers, boots, etc., I begin the round of jobs which I have been doing for the past eighteen months. That sheet has to be folded that way, that blanket this way, the mackintosh so. This, my first job of the day, I considered done satisfactory, there were others who might think otherwise, of course. For instance, that House Master fellow, he'll have quite different views to mine; anyway, let it go at that. I study the work chart for awhile, thinking to myself: "Why must these jobs have to be done every day; why not miss them now and again?" Thoughts of House Master again alters the trend of my thinking. I find my allotted task at last, one of rubbing. Now that small, insignificant word "rubbing," has, and can still be, a word to inflict painful thoughts. I well remember a dull monotonous voice saying, "Go on, get on with it, can't yer?" However, rubbing was my job, and rubbing I started to do. So, with a flourish of my rubbing cloth and a tentative dip into the Ronuk, I started upon my allotted portion. Eventually, after about twelve hours of this, a superior sort of chap, a Prefect, informed me that I could " pack up." So, grabbing the remainder of my raiment, I sally forth to bathe my body and make myself generally presentable. Just as I give the final touch to my hair, with the aid of a little tap cream, a raucous siren sounds; to me this means that I have just ten minutes' grace before my fast is broken. And in ten minutes, lo, I enter a well-lighted, cheerful room, with just a dash of bird life here and there, my head filled with visions of slices of pig and, perhaps, an effort from a chicken. Alas, 'twas just a dream! On the table is that old "stand-by," rounds, margarine and a fish cake. Quite good fare this, though, when washed down with a mug of tea or coffee. Feeling refreshed with the repast, I wait in silence for the advent of those cheerful faces who come each morning to say sweet words to me, and sing a note or two of praise. At last I am in the grand open air; the morning is still fine, the sun still shining, so, methinks, I had better make my boots shiny, too. Just as I put a last light polish to my boots, another blast from that siren tells me that I must line up with my fellows to have outer coverings, etc., inspected. Whilst waiting, that vision of a House Master materializes in form, and I greet him with a sweet "Good Morning, Sir!" Eventually, I am allowed to leave the whereabouts of my inspection, after having been informed by a certain gentleman that he would fain have speech with me. Could it possibly be that I had done something wrong the previous day? After that last little conversation, I wend my steps towards a compartment, or shop, fitted with benches, tools and all kinds of machinery, a compartment which I shall enter for the next eighteen months. It is here that I am hoping to gain sufficient knowledge to keep mind, body and soul together, when eventually I sally forth into the bitter world. Let me just dwell for a few moments on the sounds that greet me on entering. There is just a faint murmur of voices mingled with a suggestion of rowdiness here and there, then silence. As though from some unseen source, there suddenly comes to one's ears the sounds of whirling wheels, the musical swish of belts, the sharp metallic clang of hammers, and overall, in that vast jungle of sounds, one that seems to say, "I can't stop! I can't stop! !" I carry on in this atmosphere for three and a half hours, until my body at last cries out for rest and refreshment. A bugle sound, and I am allowed to go once again into the glorious sunshine. After the "rigors" of the morning's work, I feel free to frolic in the green fields and restore my jaded nerves. Once more that raucous siren curtails my freedom. This time for my mid-day meal. The viands I soon dispose of are of no mean assortment, in fact, they range as high sometimes as "Dogs and Mash." Probably, you may not know what I mean, but I can assure you they are really good. 'Tis finished; again the sunshine and a little exercise with football or cricket bat, according to the calendar. If of a studious nature, one may dwell in the maturing atmosphere of a well-stocked library. Alas, too soon that siren informs me that it is time to wend my way towards the " hives of industry." I arrive, and again that whirl and swish of wheels assails my ears, that steady sound of, "I can't stop! I can't stop! !" During the morning I may have felt quite fresh, and worked quite well, but now, as afternoon is wearing steadily to a close, I begin to feel the strain of the day creeping over me. It is with an inward groan of joy that I am at last allowed to cast down my tools, and take the air once again. Out in the open it is surprising how fresh I suddenly become. Maybe I indulge in a swift game of table tennis with my fellows, or perchance I stroll round to my club room for a game of billiards. My thirst, also that siren, tells me that I must once again refresh myself. The atmosphere in my cheerful dining-room at this time of day sometimes gets a little strong and loud. Perhaps it is only that I, with my fellow beings, feel that the hard doings of the day are closing to an end; anyhow, we do feel free to have a good friendly chat, and if one fellow gets mixed up with another chap's marg.— well, that's his look-out. After tea, I am able to receive still further information in quite a number of subjects, partaken, perhaps, in a lighter mood, For myself, I just keep to tour. I find that these just about fill up my evenings. Of course, I can, if I wish, have a flutter at some gymnastic work, or even pick up a bit of knowledge on the cornet or some other musical instrument. The sun has long vanished over the western horizon, and I myself, am beginning to feel the strains of a day well spent. So, at close of day, I unfold those sheets and blankets, after quietly meditating for a minute or two, climb thankfully into bed, and as the strains of the bugle in the far distance faintly murmur the ,"Last Post," I fall asleep.


Reply ID 74576

26/05/2010 by Dave

Evening Classes. (Somewhere in Hertford) WE are not suggesting that it was at Goldings, but in an English class one of the boys was shaky in his spelling, and therefore heard his teacher say to him: "In order to impress the correct rule on you, Albert, repeat after me three times, 'If I add a syllable to a word that ends with a consonant, I must double the consonant if it follows a vowel'." Albert duly repeated the rule thrice. "Now write it down said the teacher, and Albert wrote: "If a sillybulls at the end of a word I must double a continent when I follow a fowl!" And so a little more light is shed on the problem of why it is that teachers go grey sooner than other members of the community.


Reply ID 74577

26/05/2010 by Dave

GOLDINGS BOYS CLUB. N.A.B.C. Since our return from summer leave the Club has restarted its activities and plans have been made for the winter period. The Club Leader has arranged for several speakers to talk to the members on subjects of interest. Mr. Culver has spoken twice on China and India and his talks proved to be most interesting and enjoyable. The Headmaster came and spoke to us on his holiday in Sweden, and it was most interesting to hear of his language difficulties and of the different types of food. Mr. Johnstone, of Aberdeen House, spoke to us on his experiences in America during the war, and we were glad to welcome him to the Club. On Wednesday, 9th November, we had a visit from Superintendent Elwell, of the Hertfordshire Constabulary, and he gave us a most interesting talk on the origin of the police force and their duties to the public. We all felt how much we owe to this great public service. After the Superintendent's talk two films were shown, entitled: "Scotland Yard" and "Spotlight on Crime." These wore enjoyed by all. After the talk and film show, the Superintendent demonstrated how he could contact any police car in the county and said that Hertfordshire was the first county to adopt the radio-controlled car system. The cars used were powerful and capable of attaining a speed of no miles per hour. We hope to get a local game warden to come and talk to us on bird life in the county. We shall be visited by various public servants in the town to talk on the fire services, hospitals and local government generally. We now have new table tennis equipment and shortly we shall have two billiards tables in use. The Club will look quite cosy when the new wood panelling has been put in, and now that the stoves are lit before the Club opens it is bright and warm. I should like to say that more care should be taken with Club equipment and that the members should feel that it is their own special place of meeting, where they can relax or play any indoor game desired. The Club welcomes new members and visitors who are interested in us and we are very grateful for the gift of books and magazines. D. GODFREY.


Reply ID 74721

06/06/2010 by Dave

GOLDINGS, THE WIMBLEDON BALL BOYS FROM 1946 TO 1966 (AN EXTRACT FROM THE SCHOOL MAGAZINE OF THE TIME) WIMBLEDON The Wimbledon fortnight is perhaps the most eagerly awaited period of the school year at Goldings. When the names of the fifty boys chosen are published, there is a rush for the notice board to see who has been selected. Then the fortunate ones crease their flannels in readiness for the great day. The ball boys travel to Wimbledon by bus, through Tottenham, over London Bridge and past the Kennington Oval. On arriving at Wimbledon they march in three's to the Ball Boys' Room, passing on their left the lovely lawns which are tended by "expert grounds men all through the year. Once inside the Ball Boys' Room they see dozens of boxes, each containing six snow-white balls. One box of ball's is used for each set played. After changing into their slippers the boys receive three vouchers, one for lunch, one for tea, and the third to be exchanged for a mid afternoon drink. After lunch the boys wander around until it is time to collect the balls and cards for their courts. The cards have printed on them the names of the players and are displayed on a board for all to see. On the Centre and Number One courts there are six boys, four of whom are working at any given time. On the other courts, where games are not quite so important,there are three ball boys. One stands at the net and the others at either end of the court. If, during play, the ball hits the net, the ball boy runs across and takes the ball off the court. The boy at the server's end bounces the balls into the player's hand whenever he needs them. While a rally is in progress, the boys must keep quite still so as not to distract the attention of the players. As the tournament progresses fewer and fewer courts are occupied and so some of the boys are not required. It is always necessary though, to have a small reserve pool of boys to "fag" balls for players who want to practise before their matches. The Goldings ball boys have established a reputation for efficiency and good behaviour. Let us hope that this reputation will be maintained.


Reply ID 74958

20/06/2010 by Dave

SCHOOL NOTES The School Captain has written an article on Wimbledon, telling of yet another successful season for the ball boys. After the first day, the novices quickly settled down to the job and some of them were as expertly confident as the veterans. The boys endured the heat with good humour and though we finished late on many evenings, they stuck manfully to their jobs to the bitter end. Galloway's swerving run across the Centre Court to retrieve the ball lying at the net, was a joy to behold. In his letter of thanks to the Headmaster, Sir Louis Greig, President of the All-England Lawn Tennis Association, says: — As in previous years, their efficiency and keenness contributed a lot to a very successful meeting and it was gratifying to hear so much praise for their work, especially from visitors from overseas."


Reply ID 75148

27/06/2010 by Dave

Barnardo News ref Goldings and the Ball Boys situation 1967. BALL BOYS With the closing of Goldings this year, we were unable to provide the ball boys for the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships - a break with a long tradition. Hundreds of Goldings Old Boys have derived pleasure from this very arduous task—and have done much to enhance the name of Goldings, and Barnardo's too. We wish the Shaftesbury Homes boys, who have taken over, happiness and success in their efforts.


Reply ID 75149

27/06/2010 by Dave

I'm not sure if many people are aware of the 13 boys from Goldings who died and are buried in Waterford Church. These boys never returned to their homes or foster home but remain at Waterford. After my recent visit from the Midlands I always make a visit to the Church and pay my respect to these boys but have become quite concerned to the condition of their headstones as some appear to be falling over and names being eroded by time, so I feel it's our duty as ex Goldings boys to return them to a worthy condition. I have wrote to Barnardo's explaining my thoughts and quite shortly expect some form of reply, and if they could assist us in putting this situation to right, i.e. approaching the lottery for funding, but my reason for putting it on this site is hoping that someone out there could point us in the direction we should perhaps go (we do not seek financial help) contact names that would help us with this worthy project and perhaps guide us with suggestions as to how better to approach this just cause...many thanks in anticipation Dave.


Reply ID 75158

27/06/2010 by Woody

Dave, have you considered asking via the Church Rector? http://www.achurchnearyou.com/waterford-st-michael-all-angels/


Reply ID 75355

04/07/2010 by Dave

Champions All October, and the famous Centre Court at Wimbledon is silent. There is no crowd, no cheers, no clapping. A solitary footstep will echo through the empty passageways. The paraphernalia of radio and television, the batteries of cameras, the notebooks of reporters and journalists are busy elsewhere. The high days of summer are over and autumnal breezes are about. The champions have departed (probably to sunnier climes) and the ball-boys . . . they have returned to the William Baker School to studies which occupy their year. Yet memories remain. Memories of the pride a ball-boy felt on being chosen to be one of that famous squad. There was always the thrill of the daily coach journey, and at Wimbledon, the feeling of the great occasion. It was a real surprise to see a famous name of tennis just walking around the courts. There was pride and great delight when a champion played on our court. But mingled with all this the embarrassment felt even today, of that missed ball. Was it imagination, or did the crowd go quiet when the ball remained there at the net? But what was the crowning glory for a ball-boy at this year's Wimbledon? Surely to discover that the Champion had been a ball-boy. Then to be photographed with him. What a scene that was! Photographers all crowded at an umpire's chair, cameras, arms, legs, heads everywhere. Cameras clicking, reporters chattering, then silence for Manuel Santana's every word. What did that reporter say? The Champion had said 'the ball-boys were the best in the world'. Then we are champions, if we are the best in the world! B. L. Nixon 1966


Reply ID 75580

12/07/2010 by Donostia

Im sure this will interest you Dave . http://www.worthingherald.co.uk/worthing/Exball-boy-returns-to-Wimbledon.6414212.jp


Reply ID 75873

25/07/2010 by Dave

Many thanks for that information, we would like add the story to our website. Dave


Reply ID 75874

25/07/2010 by Dave

Many of you may know that 16 boys never left Goldings but are buried in Waterford church, along with three masters, Mister George Battell, a sports teacher who was killed in 1939 by the clock Tower at Goldings, A Wheelwright Master aged 63, who died there in 1923, and Mr Wrangles the Gardener at Goldings before it became a Barnardo Home who was a junior Gardener there in 1921,and continued to work there for Barnardo's, and he came from a very prominent family from Waterford. After my last visit to Waterford Church it was evident that the headstones of them are in a state of falling over, and the inscriptions are becoming unreadable. I'm not looking for donations but contact names and suggestions how best to return then to a much-improved condition suitable to our once proud school motto "Finis Coronat Opus" The End Crowns the Work, many thanks in anticipation Dave P.S. for further information on this subject please visit our website http://www.goldings.org History page, titled THE BOYS WHO NEVER LEFT GOLDINGS


Reply ID 76029

01/08/2010 by Dave

Welcome Malcolm Senior Citizen, and many thanks for your information and interest in my former home. The only remains of the former house is the stable block (in Barnardo's years our workshops) and the fireplace's which were taken out and refitted into the new building which now stands, and those fireplace's are still there to this day. The roof line of the stable block is castellated if you look, as was the previous building. They moved further away from the river as the thought was that the mist off the river was affecting their health. When the new building foundations were laid the children of Abel-Smith dropped coins into them at the corner of the conservatory (The former Fret Shop in the 20's, and the table tennis room in my days,60's) which is to the extreme west of the building by the chapel. I hope this fills in more history to this wonderful building. P.S.The present residents have this year invited us all back with their blessings to once more "walk the floors of Goldings" and to share with them our stories when it was also our home! Many many thanks.


Reply ID 76150

08/08/2010 by Dave

The School does not change much in a year, but visitors next summer will surely notice our enlarged Cricket Field. It occurred to somebody that the pitch would be greatly improved if we cut away a large portion of the bank on the north side. It was a formidable task— at least 400 tons of earth to dig out and carry away. But co-operative goodwill and almost tireless energy solved the problem. Everybody helped, and it was a specially notable sight to find the prefects, with Mr. D. N. Macdonald, Mr. Channer. and (sometimes, but not too often) the Governor, working away in the dark till ten o'clock, in the fantastic light of a few storm lamps. It was, however, largely due to Mr. Patch, with his thoroughly organised squads, that the largest part of the undertaking was fulfilled. 1936


Reply ID 76454

24/08/2010 by Dave

William Baker Technical School. We could not train them fast enough to meet the demands for their services. Some openings were so promising that they justified us allowing boys to leave after only a few months training, and no fewer than 250 boys passed out from the school to serve their country. They went to aeroplane factories, to engineering shops and munition plants of all kinds. Many have been back to the school for week-ends, some bringing thrilling tales with them of adventures in bombed factories and of spare-time work in A.R.P. services. " Many of them," the Governor writes, " have had terrifying experiences some have worked all night in rescue efforts, and as you speak to them you suddenly realize they have grown up. But they are the stuff out of which reconstruction after the war will be achieved. Their youth is being spent in an atmosphere of stern duty, in the midst of danger and sacrifice. They are already playing a man's part and will be fully ready, when the time comes, to do their share of rebuilding the New World." Goldings 1940


Reply ID 76636

12/09/2010 by Dave

(Censored)Christmas 1939 Goldonian Cairns House Home Master—MR. W. Battell Colours—Red and Black Christmastide — War. It seems quite wrong to connect such, but that's what's what. Here at CENSORED we do not seem to be affected to so great an extent as we expected. Were it not for the fact that we hear a few extra CENSORED and note a slight rise in the price of CENSORED peace" might be upon us. Having CENSORED to many of our numbers (with them our CENSORED we wish them all success and prosperity in their undertakings. Coincidence or luck, we have in our keeping the same four trophies that we held last year — the CENSORED Cup and Shield, and the CENSORED cup and the CENSORED Shield. With no prefects it's going to be a CENSORED CENSORED to keep anywhere near a standard that makes such success possible. Congratulations to CENSORED CENSORED on his appointment to Captain of CENSORED. Having "taken" a number of sound CENSORED in the footer field we hope for a revival — remember that a match lost is nothing when compared with lost CENSORED The state of our dormitories is still of a high order — our adopted prefects are hereby commended. We are looking forward to CENSORED and desire to send to all, the wish that theirs also will be a Merry Christmas and a Very Happy New Year. Stop Press—We hear that CENSORED has joined up in the CENSORED--Poor old Hitler! (Mustn't let the enemy know, you know,—Censor.) [Owing to the above having been written by an ex-Regular, the Censor has apparently seen fit to make a few deletions.—ED.] This is a tongue in cheek reproduction from our magazine "The Goldonian" which reflects the struggle in 1939, but surely reflects our "British Bulldog" approach to the war! Dave.


Reply ID 76831

23/09/2010 by Dave

The Goldonian Easter 1951 MESSAGE FROM AN OLD BOY LOOKING BACK The morning of 19h November, 1950, was a sad one for me because I was leaving Goldings and my friends there in order to go to my new home in the outside world. My stay at Goldings was a very pleasant one, although I must confess at the beginning I thought I should never settle down, and I imagined I would never become a prefect, let alone a House captain. I was quite surprised when I was called into the Headmaster's study and told that he was going to appoint me a prefect. I would not have thought of such a thing eighteen months earlier. I always look forward to spending a week-end at Goldings amongst my friends. For the first four weeks after leaving school, I felt very strange in my new surroundings, but after the strangeness had worn off, I soon got down to work and made a number of friends. The job I have is a very steady one with a small firm employing about twenty men. Most of the work is done by machinery. When your turn comes to leave school and start work, you will probably find things somewhat strange, but you will soon get used to them and settle down. It is a good thing to join a club when you start work as you then get to know a number of nice people, and it is something to look forward to after having done a good day's work. I hope you will follow in the footsteps of those who have tried to teach you to lead a clean and happy life. Good luck to you all! P. J. SPIRES.


Reply ID 76957

30/09/2010 by Dave

THE GOLDINGS REUNION Details of the day are as follows: Date Saturday October 2nd 2010 10.30 am Register at The Community Centre Meet old faces and browse through the photos and reminisce, refreshments will be available during the day at reasonable prices. There will be a lull around 4.30 p m for those who would like to look around Hertford, but the Hall will remain open for those who would prefer to stay through to the evening. Evening get together 7.30 p m till late. Address for the 2010 Reunion, The Sele Farm Community Centre Perret Gardens ( Off Bentley Road / The Ridgeway ) Longwood Road Sele Farm Estate SG14 2LW


Reply ID 77284

15/10/2010 by Dave

AT THIS YEARS REUNION ONE OF THE OLDEST GOLDINGS OLD BOYS WHO WAS 93yrs OLD, TURNED UP TO VISIT THE OLD SCHOOL, WHO HASN'T BEEN BACK TO THE SCHOOL FOR 75yrs, HE WAS THERE FROM 1932 TO 1935 CHARLES JONES. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE GYM SQUAD, CRICKET CAPTAIN AND FOOTBALL CAPTAIN, AN AMAZING OLD BOY TO TALK TO.


Reply ID 77496

27/10/2010 by Dave

EDITORIAL One of the outstanding events in the recent history of Goldings, was the very successful show put up by our Gym. Squad, at the Annual Albert Hall Fete. Having something to do with the composition of the School Cricket and Football teams, I can readily sympathise with my friend and brother House Master, Mr. Patch (Gym. Instructor). The Gym. boys train hard and some excellent material is moulded into a team, and then, various members, unfortunately, have to leave, creating gaps which become increasingly more difficult to fill. Another event which aroused considerable enthusiasm, was the progress our 1st XI soccer team made in the Herts. Junior Cup. We reached the Divisional Semi-final, and were the lone representatives of 36 Junior Clubs from our Leagues. We lost to a senior side from the East Herts. League, to the tune of 2 - 4. With any luck, we should have won. The wind, which was a powerful ally to the Argos in the first half, enabled them to lead by four goals to nil. In the 2nd half, the wind dropped completely and yet we scored two goals, and came near to scoring many more. Our goalie, too, struck a real "off-day." We went down with our colours flying. "What man could do better than facing fearful odds, For the honour of his school and the temple of his gods" ? (With apologies to Macaulay.} The School Inter-House Football has produced some keen games, and whilst it seems Buxton are virtually winners of the Shield, yet the runners-up cup still remains very open. The Inter-House Boxing and Cross Country Race are the next items on our Athletic Programme. I trust we shall have many entries for both events. THE EDITOR. Goldonian January 1936


Reply ID 77565

01/11/2010 by Dave

THE GOLDINGS JACKDAW A few months ago one of the boys at our Technical School at Goldings, who happened to be in the Sick Bay, found a jackdaw and brought it into the ward. The bird quickly settled down in its new home, and was fed, watered and nurtured by the boy, and soon became great friends. The jackdaw goes everywhere with this boy, who at night places the bird on the rail at the back of his bed, where' it stays until the morning. The jackdaw even goes into the Dining Hall, and without the slightest hesitation is able to pick out his friend from over 260 boys. It comes regularly for a mid-day bath, sitting in a large tub while a jug of warm water is poured over it. The bird also goes into the carpenters' shop, and it is a common thing to see it perched on a boy's bench, ignoring the noise. An amusing incident occurred on Armistice Sunday, when the boys marched in six companies to a church in Hertford two miles away. While on the march their little feathered friend was seen to be flying towards them, backwards and forwards from one company to another, just above the boys' heads. When they reached Hertford, it waited outside the church until all the boys were seated, and then returned to the School. It will perch on the hand or shoulder of any of the boys, and will go to them at a call, but it seems to fight shy of the masters. A very knowing bird ! An Old Boy Goldonian March 1949


Reply ID 77673

06/11/2010 by Dave

On the 13th November, Remembrance Sunday, we attended the British Legion parade and service at Standon church. We marched from Puckeridge to Standon leading the Parade. During the service in the church one of the buglers sounded the 'Last Post' and 'Reveille'. During the afternoon of the 13th, we attended the British Legion parade at Roydon, and after the service in the church the 'Last Post' and 'Reveille' were sounded at the War Memorial to the roll of drums. The following is a list of individual duties performed by buglers on Remembrance Day. L/Cpl. Gee at Wareside in the morning and Sawbridgeworth in the afternoon. Cpl. Peterson at Hertingfordbury in the morning and School chapel in the evening; Cadet Furnise at Wheathampstead in the afternoon; L/Cpl. Bainton at Standon in the morning; Cadet Ball at Standon in the morning, Stanstead Abbotts in the afternoon and School Chapel in the evening; Cadet Peek at Waterford in the morning and Watton-at-Stone in the afternoon; L/Cpl. Ambrose at Stanstead Abbotts in the afternoon. On Monday, 14th November, L/Cpls. Bainton and Gee attended a military funeral at Chingford, and sounded the 'Last Post' and 'Reveille' at the graveside. In closing I would like to wish all ranks a very happy Christmas and a successful new year. A. P. CULVER, Captain O. I.. C Goldonian Winter 1960


Reply ID 77775

15/11/2010 by Dave

GOLDINGS NOTES During the summer term there can be little excuse for the boredom of inactivity at Goldings. Events follow one another in rapid, almost bewildering succession and few boys find themselves with time on their hands. Inter-house cricket and water polo matches take place in the evenings; gardening enthusiasts steal an hour now and then to tend their allotments; Cadets are busy with training exercises, sporting activities and week-end camps. Their annual camp in July will be held in Essex and they will be honoured by a visit from Lord Montgomery of Alamein. Also in July is the inspection of the Cadets by H.R.H. Princess Margaret at the Boys' Garden City. This year all the Cadets will visit the Royal Tournament at Olympia. At the end of June about 40 boys went to the All England Lawn Tennis Tournament at Wimbledon to act as ball boys. Once again Fortune favoured us with fine weather on i7th May for our Athletic Sports, which were conducted with the smoothness and precision one associates with anything organised by Mr. Patch. Somerset House won for the second year in succession. The shield and "victor ludorum" awards (to Vallance, Morgan and Smith 221), were presented by the Mayor of Hertford. Boxing teams from the Russell-Cotes, Watts Naval and Goldings competed in an inter-school boxing tournament in the Gym at Goldings on igih May. This is an innovation which proved highly successful. Russell-Cotes won with 28 points, Watts Naval and Goldings securing 25 and 20 points respectively. Some of our boys have acted in the crowd scenes of "The Guinea Pig," a film based on Public School life. All enjoyed their experience and are eagerly awaiting an opportunity of seeing themselves on the screen. G. F. July 1948


Reply ID 78014

26/11/2010 by Dave

Boxing 1958 In the Services it is often referred to as spit and polish—or "bull"; in the theatre it is called "decor' 'and our American cousins would call it a "slick show", but call it what you will this dressing-up business for putting on a show of any kind is very important, often aa important as the artists themselves, because it creates the atmosphere which brings out the best in the performer. I have no doubt that our new raised boxing ring, which gave everyone a grand view, the officials dressed for their various parts, and of course, the boxers, neat, clean and efficient in their respective corners, all helped to create the right atmosphere, as well as producing some splendid boxing. The boxing as a whole did not produce any "dark horses" as it has in the past, but there was no doubt about the effort and tenacity which was shown particularly by the chaps who entered simply to make up the team and support their Houses. One or two received "shiners" for their efforts, but whatever they may have lost in the ring they gained a hundred-fold in prestige and respect from the spectators. Congratulations to Robert Watkins who captained the winning Senior team, Somerset, and who was for the second year, awarded the "Best Boxer of the Year" trophy. DE BOECK TROPHY It was Somerset's year without a doubt; they had a grand team and were worthy winners. Aberdeen came second, but were rather unfortunate, having too many boys about the same weight, but they managed to raise a team. Cairns, I'm sorry to say, entered two boxers short which was a pity, as I am sure there were chaps who could have done well had they entered. The Senior boys of note: Ken Hammond boxed very well, although he hadn't a great deal of opposition—his third year for his House; Terry Cann was very much the complete boxer v style, skill and sportsmanship—stronger opposition may have given him a better showing; Jim Murrell showed up well and used his left to advantage—it's a good one and I should know! DE VISCHER TROPHY The Juniors produced three grand evenly balanced teams; in fact, so even that Pelham and Buxton boxed to a draw and share the de Vischer trophy. Again the Juniors were unfortunate in having a number of boys at the same weight but still made up with the plucky chaps. Juniors of note who should do well as Seniors: E. Sainsbury boxed well, showing good technique; B. Ivey, a good "big 'un" for the future; Len Peck has something to give the School in the way of boxing. R. N.


Reply ID 78411

18/12/2010 by Dave

Christmas Pantomime THE SCHOOL Dramatic Society presented the pantomime 'Robinson Crusoe' for the Christmas entertainment and all agreed that the show proved a complete success. Under the capable direction of Mr. Newton, a good balance of singing, acting, and dancing was welded together to produce a lively and spirited show, and the scenery, props and costume in the care of Mr. Sheppard were even more spectacular than last year, and added colour and background to give the parts authenticity. No sooner had the ink dried on Mr. Newton's script when the scenery was being painted, costumes were being fitted, and rehearsals were under way. The school block with a project group moved into full production making spears, shields, masks, headdresses and all the impediments for equipping a, native tribe. Mrs. Sheppard began a search for cast-offs which could In; adapted to dress this cast of varied actors, and needles and scissors joined the rhythm of rehearsals; yes, even to the extent of robing Robinson Crusoe in a full outfit of furs. The 'carps' were called on, and willingly gave their help in making straw huts, boats and other flat props which were soon under the brush of the scenery painters. Many others were called on and without exception willingly gave their help and added to the spirit of camaraderie which prevailed throughout the whole production. Mr. Newton added to his already mammoth task of direction by playing the lead as Mrs. Big Chief and gave a balance of comedy which created a true panto atmosphere. Mr. Wood and Mr. Moules were a good comedy combination as Stanley and Livingstone and although troubled with mosquitoes, spiders, and a gate-crashing girl, were successful in rescuing Crusoe from a warm end. All were pleased to see the apprentices in this year's cast, and Eric Holden as a dignified and jregal chief, Clive Lewis as a patient Robinson Crusoe who had no control over his four boys, and even less over Mrs. Big Chief, and David Mundy as a colourful and virile witch doctor, were all a happy addition to the Society and will perhaps now encourage others to join future shows. The many other characters as native boys and girls and island visitors all added to the mood and gaiety which added up to the sum total of a good show and on the final curtain there was a feeling of regret that it was all over. The second performance given to an audience of the old people of Hertfordshire brought many tears of laughter to old and wrinkled faces, and what added pleasure they got by being served tea in the interval by a native tribe in full war paint! A few words from one of them sums up the whole show: 'How wonderful to see the boys on stage enjoying themselves; and how much more wonderful than that they were able to pass on this enjoyment to others. CAST AND HELPERS Robinson Crusoe, Clive Lewis; Chief Bigga Banga, Eric Holden; Mrs. Bigga Banga, Mr. R. Newton; Stanley, Mr. R. Wood; Livingstone, Mr. S. Moules; Man Friday, John Mason; Robinson Crusoe's boys:. No. 1, Barry Hyland; No. 2, Stephan Denton; No. 3, John Lau; No. 4, Colin Bishop; Witch Doctor, David Mundy; Native Warriors: Ian Parks, Robert Hill, William Collinson, Harold Holberry, Michael Massey, John Major, James Kennedy, John Moore; Native Girls: David Holmes, Ralph Purdy, Glyn Parry, Paul Smith; Production and Script, Mr. R. Newton; Stage Manager and Designer, Mr. F, Sheppard; Costumes, Mrs. F. Sheppard; Musical Director, Mr. L. Mondin; Drums, Mr. A Bennett; Make-up, Mrs. Newton, Mrs. Sheppard, Mrs. Wade, Mrs. Powell. FOR SALE One large black cooking pot. Would fit a boy approximately the size of Clive Lewis. Has been passed by Prudence Pots, the pan inspector. Going cheap. Would suit department with boy surplus. F. S. Goldonian 1962


Reply ID 78601

31/12/2010 by Dave

WHEN I CAME TO GOLDINGS When I first entered the grounds of Goldings I had already many ideas of what the school would look like. I was surprised. When I first saw it in the distance it looked rather like a castle on a hill. I saw many boys walking through the grounds and felt shy and awkward and a little scared with the strangeness of the surroundings. I soon saw some boys whom I already knew and it wasn't long before my shyness left me and I became one of them. There was a great difference between Goldings and my previous home both in appearance and organisation. There were fewer boys at my previous home and when I left I was a senior. Here I was a junior and a very new one at that. I was accustomed to the 'House system' but there were more boys in the 'Houses' at Goldings. I had to become accustomed to 'Prefects' for we had none at my last home. It wasn't long before I was asked several questions by the boys. Could I swim or jump, play cricket or football. It was rather bewildering at first but I soon settled down to school routine. I have now chosen my trade and will learn it for two or three years before I go out into the world to earn my living. If I had chosen printing I might have remained at Goldings until I had reached the age of twenty one. When I leave I shall look back and feel pleased that I came here to learn my trade, and I shall look back I hope to some very happy memories. E.TOYNTON


Reply ID 78819

10/01/2011 by Dave

The Goldings Exhibition This exhibition was devised by the Headmaster to show the public something of the work and hobbies of the boys and staff of our School. It was officially opened on Thursday, 2nd October, by Mr. H. K. Fowler, Deputy Education Officerfor Hertfordshire. Mr. Fowler was introduced by Mr. L. B. Keeble chairman of the Goldings sub committee, who also welcomed visitors to the exhibi tion, which included the Mayor and MayoressOf Hertford, Councillor and Mrs. W. L. Foster, It was the first time that the School had been open to the public for three successive days, and it should be recorded as another success. How many people actually came to see our work is difficult to estimate but it is generally felt that the numbers were between 400 and 500. When one appreciates that the actual hours available to the public were only eleven-and-a-half, and that torrential rain fell for a great part of this time, it makes the response seem all the more wonderful. I was hoping that some of our photographic enthusiasts would produce some really good photographs, so that I could reproduce them in our Magazine for the benefit of those readers who were unable to attend, but alas, I have only the two appearing, which were kindly sent to me by the chief photographer of the Hertfordshire Mercury. Briefly let me try and put the scene of the exhibition into words. The old schoolroom was the centre of attraction, having been exquisitely decorated by our Painting and Decorating department, and set out with three stands made by the Carpenters to show the work of the Sheet-metal Work, Carpentry and Woodwork, and Boot and Shoe-making departments; a double-sided seat was the centre piece, so placed that our older visitors could just sit and look!! Through the east door and in the old library the Gardening and Letterpress Printing departments had their main exhibition, the Printers occupying the walls with a varied selection of their printing, and the Gardeners occupying the centre of the room with their home produce. The hobbies of boys and staff were magnificently displayed in the staff dining room. What talent we have ! Oil paintings, sculpture, basket work, embroidery, models, cake decorating, in fact something of everything. Who was responsible for the layout I do not know, but to the person or persons I say well done! Apart from the actual exhibition of work, there were always other things happening. Twice daily, members of the Junior School gave a stage and screen show on the Life Work of Dr. Barnardo. Once again one can only congratulate producers and actors on a truly wonderful effort. Never once was a prompt needed. In the Gymnasium the gymnastic team untiringly performed for any visitors who looked in. At the end of the official printed programme of the exhibition appears a single line, "Light refreshments on sale". Not a very conspicuous line, and the people who produced those refreshments equally as inconspicuous, but what a debt we all owe them. To staff and visitors that welcome "cuppa" and a sandwich was the crowning glory to a first-class show. On the Sunday the exhibition was at the disposal of all the Old Boys, who turned up at the annual reunion. N.T.P. 1958


Reply ID 79172

29/01/2011 by Dave

Mr. R. H. Purkis MR. R. H. PURKIS, brother of Mr. W. Purkis, joined the permanent staff on 4th November, 1936, after serving in a temporary capacity in the Printing Department. During the war years he served as Aberdeen Housemaster, and undertook the duties of Chief Fire Officer at the School. In company with the remainder of the staff, Mr. Purkis undertook many extraneous duties including those of tractor driving and sports master, I am sure it is not generally known that Mr. Purkis was the founder of the Bugle Band in 1941, which took the place of the School Military Band, and which today is the Corps of Drums. If one looks at the 'Honours List' for billiards and snooker, which hangs in the staff room, they will see the name of Mr. R. Purkis as 'winner' and 'runner-up' on more than one occasion. He was certainly a force to be reckoned with when it came to using a cue! Mr. Purkis has many hobbies including photography and music, and the one that takes up most of his spare time is music. He has been a regular member of the Hertford Town Band since its formation, and plays a euphonium and bass. This gift for music is something he has passed on to his son, who is also a member of the Band, but is content with a smaller instrument, the trumpet. In 1943 Mr. Purkis returned to the Printing Department and took charge of the warehouse and small plates room, and assisted with theory instruction. With the growth of the department, the warehouse work became a full-time job, and Mr. Purkis carried on in this capacity until 1957, when he was able to take up his duties as instructor in the machine department once again. It seems that members of the Goldings staff are unique in their adaptability, and Mr. R, Purkis has proved no exception. A. E. B. Goldonian Summer 1961


Reply ID 79468

12/02/2011 by Dave

Throughout the lifetime of Goldings (1922-67) there were many events and supportive local people and staff that were rarely appreciated by the boys, so I would like to take this opportunity to show that we now recall them with fondness,and Mr Newton,our P.T. Instrutor was to the forefront of many events that were to mould parts of our characters,and later years after leaving Goldings he was Youth Officer for Hertford and recorded on T.V. organising the Hertford "It's A Knockout" team. To remind us of these few people here are a few extracts from The Goldonian (The School Magazine) SPORTS SECTION Cavalcade of Sport ON SATURDAY, 16th January, 1960, Goldings had the pleasure of presenting a unique show of indoor sporting activities in the gymnasium. Teams and clubs had gone to a great deal of trouble in helping to give Hertford its first Cavalcade of Sport. The first event was a display of boxing by boys of W.B.T.S. and a very commendable exhibition was given by Michael Petersen and Harold Holberry. A fencing demonstration followed and was given by the Haileybury College P.T. instructor and a pupil. In turn was then staged a Scottish dancing display and most attractive were the costumes and steps of the dancers; a demonstration of a very high standard of table tennis played by two county champions, a P.T. display by a team of girls from Ware Secondary Modern School, and forward rolls have never looked more graceful; a demonstration of camping by Hertford Senior Scouts, who proved that you can get a quart into a pint pot when they showed the equipment stored in a rucksack; a trampoline display by the School gym. team who as usual made it look far too easy; a further display by the Scottish dancers; a weight lifting demonstration when even the audience grunted during such Herculean lifting, and finally a detailed demonstration of Judo, when all were amazed to see a 13 stone man thrown across the canvas by a 14 year old 8 stone boy. We can all say that during a long show there was never a dull moment, and all thanks for this must go to Mr. Newton who spent some considerable time in arranging and producing this cavalcade. The difficulty was in fitting so many events together as a show without preliminary rehearsals and with many headaches for the stage manager Mr. Sheppard, this was somehow achieved. Besides providing us with an evening's unusual entertainment the main aims of the cavalcade were to foster interest in as many varied activities as possible, and to introduce to Hertford a new method of presenting physical activity in an entertaining way, which could be enlarged upon and shown in the town at some future date. Many important people connected with physical activity in the town and county were present and all said how successful this new venture had been. One wondered how many arms and legs would be left lying around the dormitories after seeing this show but reports to date indicate that all is well. F. S. S. Spring 1960 Life can be very hard, and the march of time often appears cruel and ruthless and I am sure our very good friend and member of the Goldings Committee, Mr. Daniel Dye, would be the first to endorse that remark. Until a few weeks ago Mr. Dye was 'Alderman Dye', an honour bestowed on him many years ago by members of the Hertford Borough Council, and he had regularly been re-elected to that exalted position until this year, when he failed to secure enough votes from his colleagues. Every local resident knows the great amount of good this public-spirited man has bestowed on every kind of charitable and worthwhile organization. I am sure all present and past members of Goldings will join me in offering our commiserations, and to assure Mr. Dye that although he may have had to give way to a younger man, his great kindness to the young and old will never be forgotten. We here at Goldings will always be pleased to welcome Mr. Dye, and who knows, perhaps we may see a little more of him now that his official duties are less ! Summer 1961 M A. E. brooks, who is a native of Hertford, served his apprenticeship as a painter and decorator with Messrs. Richard Ginn and Son, and in fact spent the first 10 years of his working life with that firm. Prior to his appointment to the Goldings staff in May, 1935, Mr. Brooks worked for himself, as at that time unemployment was at its peak, and provided one had the initiative it was easier to get a living on your own, than to get a job working for someone else. During the Second World War, Mr. Brooks became housemaster of Cairns; house, and served with the Home Guard (Goldings Platoon), under Sgt. Penny (ex-Printing Department). With the shortage of staff during the war years, many jobs came under the jurisdiction of Mr. Brooks, including games master, tractor driver, and lawn mowing, to name but a few. As with all progressive units, there have been many changes here at Goldings during the past 26 years, and one of the more recent has been the formation of our Painting and Decorating department as a craft teaching unit, and in January, 1957, Mr. Brooks was appointed head of this very popular department. This meant of course that apart from being responsible for the general decorating of the home and workshops, he would also be responsible for the training of boys as future painters and decorators. Already there are quite a number of boys who can thank Mr. Brooks for the start he has given them, also there must be quite a few boys who have realized rather suddenly that painting isn't a job 'anyone can do'. I think all members of the staff are agreed that in a job of this nature, a ready sense of humour is essential, and surely Mr. Brooks is not lacking in this capacity. In fact some members of the staff are not always certain whether the story of the moment is 'fact' or 'fiction'. Mr. Brooks is also a very keen gardener, and it is not unusual for him to be seen working away on his allotment before the majority of us have thought about rising in the mornings. The parish of Christ Church, Bengeo, also has a lot to thank Mr. Brooks for, as he is their churchwarden, and has been lay vice-chairman of the Parochial Church Council since 1953. These appointments do not mean a couple of committee meetings a year, but lots of hard work and the forfeit of many hours of spare time. In conclusion I would like to suggest that should Mr. Brooks ever decide to register a family motto he could do a lot worse than adopt our School motto 'The End Crowns the Work'. N. T. P. Spring 1961


Reply ID 80176

21/03/2011 by Dave

SATURDAY SOCCER ST. GEORGE'S Boys' Club, of Enfield, proved too strong for our boys in the Eastern Divisional County Cup Final. Having beaten Ware Spartans to reach this final, we were rather optimistic when we travelled to Enfield for this match, and this optimism was intensified at the kick-off when St. George's could field only ten players. However, those ten were just too good for our eleven. Conditions were bad, but equally bad for both sides so no excuse- is offered. Week after week it is apparent that our boys individually are no less skilled and no less fit than their opponents—it is a question of intelligent play. Each and every player should be playing every minute of the game, seeking to position himself. In attack a player should attempt to isolate himself from the opposing defence so that he has room to move and counteract the next move if he receives the ball. In defence a player must position himself and anticipate likely moves towards his goal, and once in possession, should quickly pass to a more favourably placed team-mate. It is so easy to criticize from the touchline, but any criticism or suggestion is only made because we would like to see our boys' obvious individual talent welded into a united, enthusiastic team. Our programme has been a very full one, seldom a vacant Saturday, and the competitions have been varied and interesting. One incident should be recorded here. Our boys, playing on top field, were awarded a goal by the referee. Our forwards volunteered the information that the ball had run out of play before it entered the net. The referee thanked them and altered his decision. Some people would rate this poor gamesmanship, but I rate it very good sportsmanship. Congratulations to W. Workman, who has played in every match this season, cup, league and friendlies. Our league record to date is: Played 15, won 8, lost 6, drawn 1, goals for 57, goals against 36, points 17. R. S. SPRING 1962


Reply ID 80179

21/03/2011 by Dave

SCOUTING AT GOLDINGS THE TITLE is probably a little misleading until one begins to think about our association with scouting in the district. Over the past few years our relationship with the scouts has become much stronger by the help we have been able to give each other. We have had assistance from them in the form of properties for our pantomimes, and the loan of camping equipment to help us with the development of the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, even to the extent of allowing us to camp with them. The bond of co-operation reached its climax, when in October, the Headmaster gave permission for the annual county Senior Scout gathering to be held on top field. This was a tremendous decision for the Headmaster to make, when one bears in mind he was accepting a further 500 youths into the precincts for two days and nights. Many of us had visions of the football pitches looking like a battlefield when the gathering had dispersed, but our fears were groundless, it would have been difficult to tell that anyone had been there at all, which is as it should be. A wonderful week-end was enjoyed by all concerned; the camp was a wonderful success and the relationship between the School and the Scouts was further improved by the many friendships that were made. A great majority of the scouts took the opportunity of visiting our Exhibition and were greatly impressed by the standard of work and production. R. N. Winter 1962


Reply ID 80314

28/03/2011 by Dave

PRIZE-GIVING—1964 THIS YEAR we were blessed with a fine day, but the proceedings were marred by the news that Mr. Tucker, former General Superintendent of the Homes, and great friend of our School, had been taken ill and would be unable to be present as guest of honour. However, we were fortunate in obtaining the services of the Mayor of Hertford, Councillor A. W. Bentley, to take over the duties of Mr. Tucker, and our sincere thanks are due to Councillor Bentley for stepping into the breach at such short notice. The pattern of events for our great day was traditionally the same as in previous years, starting with the singing of the National Anthem followed by the hymn 'O praise ye the Lord!', and the opening prayer. Chairman of the Goldings Committee, Councillor L. Keeble, J.P., officially opened the proceedings by welcoming all visitors with a few well-chosen words. He then went on to say what an exciting year we had experienced as a nation, with the Olympics and General Election just completed, and therefore foremost in our minds, but perhaps most of all the speed of modern development in industry generally, which was making it an even greater problem for our boys leaving the security of this school, but one which we were facing up to. Mr. Keeble then went on to report the progress of some of our boys who are now in situations, and out of forty reports fifteen were highly satisfactory, eighteen were satisfactory, and only three could be classed as unsatisfactory. Mr. Keeble also thought it should be noted what a difficult task our Headmaster had in attracting the right type of person to our staff. Finally, Mr. Keeble paid tribute to two members of our staff who will be leaving within the next twelve months. Mr. W. Purkis, who has been a member of our Printing Department for 34 years, and to whom a great many boys are indebted for starting them on their careers as machine minders, and Mr. R. Newton who is leaving us at Christmas to take up a new position with the Hertfordshire County Council as Youth Officer, after nine years' service as Physical Training Instructor and Warden of the Verney Hostel. On behalf of all membsrs of the council he wished Mr. Purkis a happy and Ion? retirement, and Mr. Newton success in his new job. Our Headmaster, Mr. R, F. Wheatley, B.Sc., then paid tribute to His Worship the Mayor for stepping into the breach at such short notice, and deemed it a great honour for the School. Mr. Wheatley then said how sorry we all were that Mr. Tucker had been taken ill and was unable to be with us, but that he, Mr. Wheatley, would convey to Mr. Tucker on behalf of all present our best wishes for a speedy recovery. Mr. Wheatley then stated that the object of our School was to endeavour to raise the standard of the boys to a high degree of skill in trade and scholastic ability. We do not have selection of entry, yet all get the same chance to prove themselves when they get here. It is true that a small proportion of boys do not take advantage of the facilities, and this is a source of worry and anxiety to the staff, who all show a terrific amount of patience and inspire enthusiasm. The question of staff is a great problem as the Chairman said, and this is particularly so on the Home side. In the shops and school the average length of service at the moment including two new members who have been with us only weeks, is 15 years, which speaks for itself. Although those engaged to work in the Home, where more patience is required, have not such a fine average, there are some who have given many years, and here Mr. Wheatley instanced 'Skipper' Culver, 19 years, Mr. Whitbread, 34 years, Mr. Jack Cooper, 16 years, and Mr. Steele and Mr. Clarke 8 years and 4 years each respectively. The Headmaster then went on to outline the changes we could look forward to. The new School building should be ready for use by September next. The original classrooms will be fitted out in relation to the skilled trades, so that each boy will have an opportunity to try his hand at several trades before making a final decision. Turning to the question of education nationally, Mr. Wheatley asked 'what will the new Minister of Education do for the ordinary chap? What qualities does the ordinary type need?' and then Mr. Wheatley placed these requirements, as he saw them, under three headings: 1. Right character; 2. Adaptability; 3 Able to put leisure hours to good use. With the school leaving age to be at 16, then more time must be spent doing practical work. Adaptability will be a 'must', and boys who are adaptable will be all right. Adventure training was another aspect of youth education that the School had tackled, and we now had our own centre in North Wales. This would give all boys a chance to live close to nature, each having the opportunity of trips of six weeks' duration during their stay at the School. Finally Mr. Wheatley thanked a group of workers who were not present at the Prize-giving, the Welfare Officers, all of whom work tremendously hard, but who are so often overlooked. The Mayor of Hertford, Councillor A. W. Bentley, then presented the prizes and certificates to the boys and apprentices as listed below. Having completed the easy part of his task, the Mayor then said a few well-chosen words, stating how sorry he was that events had put him in the spot to do the talking, when he was hoping to have listened to the words of wisdom from Mr. Tucker. Mr. Bentley said that when he first came to Hertford 14 years ago some of the first sounds he heard were our bugle calls, and after inquiry was told of our School. He also said that it was the opinion of some members of the community that Goldings was NOT an asset to the town. However, Mr. Bentley considered that we were now a great credit to the community of Hertford, and this was due to the work of the Headmaster and staff. Addressing the boys, Mr. Bentley said that life does not end when you leave Goldings, and that in some respects our boys have an advantage over their contemporaries who have to make up their minds what they are going to do before they leave school. Other advantages were that they live in a friendly atmosphere, are not shut off in one little community, and are able to mix with other boys from all over the country, and that they are trained for their future life, seeing how their companions are being trained in their particular trade. Finally, Mr. Bentley expressed his hope that, all boys would remember their Christian teaching and carry on mixing in a Christian community. Before the final hymn and blessing, given by the Padre, the Reverend B. Nixon, Mr, L. Embleton, our Deputy Headmaster, proposed a vote of thanks to Mr. Bentley, and felt sure that his words of advice could be well heeded and that our boys should realize what wonderful opportunities they have before it is too late. Afterwards staff and visitors adjourned to the staff room for tea.


Reply ID 80617

11/04/2011 by Dave

THINKING OF CHRISTMAS THE majority of boys are now formulating their plans for Christmas. Those fortunate ones who will be going on leave are looking forward expectantly to the morning when they will be saying "good-bye" to Goldings for the Christmas period. The remainder of us who will be left behind will be none the less joyful, for although we shall not be having the thrill of going away, we shall all be caught up in the Christmas atmosphere. What a wonderful time this festive season is, not from the point of what we receive, but from what we can give. Isn't it surprising how at this time of year we are busy delving into drawers and amongst old Christmas cards to find the address of some almost forgotten friend, so that we can send him the season's greetings? But Christmas passes, and with it, too, the atmosphere that it has created. Our friends are forgotten, perhaps, and we do not feel quite the same towards our fellows as we did on Christmas morning. Then, almost anyone was "Hail, fellow, well met!" What a pity this feeling of comradeship and goodwill does not permeate all through the year. What a different world this would be. I am not an ideologist, but I do believe that it is possible for this state of affairs to exist and that the majority of the peoples of the world are beginning to realise the necessity for co-operation and friendship, and the futility of war. We can help foster this feeling in our own small way, for it is only through small beginnings that great things are achieved. Let us, then, try to contribute our little share at the School and at home. Also let us spare a thought for those who are on active service and are righting our battles. We have a duty to perform on their behalf; we must do our bit on the home front, and that duty may consist of helping to improve our tiny sphere of activity so that our friends may return to an even better life than the one they left. R. H. P. TACKLING THE FOOD PROBLEM GOLDINGS is doing its bit towards the war effort; all but five' acres of the top field, and all the bottom, have been cultivated for the growing; of potatoes and turnips. The boys are doing their share on the allotments. The huts that used to dot the allotments have disappeared. No longer can the pets be seen running around, the bovs have gone in for something altogether different, the growing of food. The War Years at Goldings


Reply ID 80858

24/04/2011 by Dave

A Footnote He met me as I walked briskly along the High Road, Waterford. "Hello! where are you off to?" was his remark. "Going for a walk", was my answer. He looked puzzled. "Whatever for? " he queried. "Because I love walking", I replied. This stumped him, and he gave me a doubtful look full of pity as he turned into his garage. Walking for pleasure is a lost art. In my youth, it was practised by many in leisure hours. At week-ends the country foot-paths were animated by crowds of folk just "out for a walk". Mr. Smith and Mr. Brown leading the way, followed at an interval of a few yards by their wives, and all the little Smiths and Browns gyrating around in proximity. No traffic perils then, and no compulsion to keep off the highway as is the case today. The children knew every yard of the surrounding district, each nook and cranny in the local hedgerows and spinneys, and all public footpaths were well trodden and well known by all. The countryside surrounding Goldings is splendidly accommodating to the walker. He can radiate out in a dozen directions and, although several local paths have gone through public neglect, off-the-road tracks are still plentiful. If the walker is interested in inspecting links with the past, he can walk to the spot where an infamous highwayman was hanged, the site being marked by an inscribed post set in a local hedgerow. Or, by walking three miles in the opposite direction, he can view a historic memorial which marks the spot where a Welsh Lord Mayor of London found a means of satisfying the City's greatest need. Curiously, a present student of Goldings bears the same surname as this great name, spelt in the same unusual manner. The riverside walk from Waterford to Stapleford by way of Bulls Mill is a delight, but here again the passage grows difficult because of disuse. So put on your thick shoes, leave the car in the garage,, march straight by the bus stop, and go for a walk! An observation by a Goldings Boy. Winter 1958 Goldings


Reply ID 81159

11/05/2011 by Dave

RATIONED REFLECTIONS Our readers hardly need to be reminded of the fact that the war position has worsened since our last issue, and at the time of writing these reflections Mr. Churchill has not answered the Government's critics of the conduct of the battles in the Middle East; but we recall that our valiant Prime Minister has always foreshadowed very dark days ahead of us before we can reach the goal of the victory of Democracy over the powers of Evil. So far Goldings has not suffered very badly as the result of the conflict; it is true that the changes in staff necessitated by the call to the services of our younger men cannot he called changes for the better—we miss them very sorely—added to which various restrictions of supplies have created many difficulties; but on the whole the changes have been so gradual that to many they are not even apparent. Old Boys continue to pay welcome visits; present boys have good food in plenty; the fortunate ones still go on leave; and football, cricket, athletics and swimming are indulged in to the full. All the shops have an abundance of work, the carpenters doing a good turn for the younger children in the Homes by making a quantity of really beautiful toys, and for the purpose are using wood from trees felled in the grounds. But a grim reminder of the war came a few weeks ago in the form of a telegram from the War Office, apprising the Governor that Captain Deryck Macdonald had been wounded. Fortunately, this was soon followed by a cable from Mr. Deryck, bearing the good news that his wound was slight. In spite of the silly talk which was often heard a few years ago, our youths are as brave and as enterprising as ever they were, and are prone to make light of their hurts; but we sincerely hope that Captain Macdonald will indeed very soon be restored to perfect fitness. As we pen these lines the Governor is laid aside, and is causing us some concern through fluctuations of temperature which compel him to remain abed. In wishing him a speedy recovery, we also explain the reason why these notes are humbly subscribed— w. L. G. GOLDONIAN 1942


Reply ID 81322

19/05/2011 by Dave

Mr Wheatley was the Headmaster of Goldings from 1945-66 and is credited with the many improvements to the school and standard of education,and as described by a Staff member "20 years ahead of his time" and many of his idea's are being muted by the present Goverment as a way forward with todays young men.If you would like to read more on this remarkable man,please visit our site http://www.goldings.org Go to Personalities and click on to Staff! Dave,Goldings 1962-65. LETTER OF APPRECIATION THE HEADMASTER received the following letter of appreciation from Mr. Bassett, father of Tony and John, who both set such a fine example of how to make the best of the facilities available to boys who come to this School. Dear Sir, I am writing to you to express my thanks to you, and all of your staff for the education my two boys received while being at your school, and amongst other things the kindness, care and thought which everyone of you have showed towards them. I shall always be grateful to you, also my thoughts will always be with you. May God bless you and help you to carry on the good work so that other children may benefit from your school. Once again my thanks from the bottom of my heart. Yours very truly, (signed) J. Bassett


Reply ID 81575

07/06/2011 by Dave

YE OLDE GOLDYNGS A recently published book, "The Carrington Diary", by W. Branch Johnson, gives an interesting account of rural life in our district as it was 160 years ago. Having been inspired by this peep into the past, one felt a desire to probe into still more remote times in search of the origin of that glamorous name of our estate, Goldings. The village of Waterford existed as far back as the year 1248, when King Henry III reigned in England, and the chief landowner was one John Goldyng. Obviously, his name became attached to the area and records of the name appear in the Charter Rolls of 1315. Descendants of John Goldyng, Ralph Payn, Richard Revel and John Rykener, have supplied other estate names in this locality; Paynes Hall, Revels Hall and Rickneys. John Carrington was the occupier of Bacon's Farm, which, in the days of Trafalgar and Waterloo, adjoined the Goldings estate on the Western side. John was a busy farmer and local dignitary, and he found time to keep a very detailed diary of his daily routine between the years 1797 and 1810. He was a great friend of his neighbour, Richard Emmott, who resided at Goldings. In those days, the North Road out of Hertford ran through the middle of the Goldings estate, by the mansion, which overlooked our present cricket field, and stood on the site of our grass tennis courts. The buildings now comprising the Printing and Shot-making Departments are all that remain today of Richard Emmott's residence. The present road from Goldings to Waterford follows the route of the old highway. Surface erosion has recently uncovered parts of the stone causeway which was used to help the wheels of stagecoaches along the steep incline down jnto Waterford. In 1875, Robert Smith built the present mansion, and was allowed to close this road, causing a new one to be constructed round the edge of the estate. In his diary, John Carrington mentions a visit to "Hartford" (as it was then known) to see a famous road walker named Webster, who attempted to walk from London to York in sixty hours. Meeting this worthy at the Cold Bath Inn, during a pause for refreshment, John accompanied the athlete on his way as far as Goldings, but the farmer then found the pace too hot, and reports that they covered ;1 mile in ten minutes. He was asked to make the first Census of the district in 1801, and mentions that he was also asked to officiate at Bramfield as tax collector. Another public duty he undertook was the inspection of local roads, and he was much troubled by frequent flooding of the highway at Goldings. He was also called in to arbitrate when Squire Emmott upset the Waterford community Goldonian Magazine Spring 1967


Reply ID 81800

19/06/2011 by Dave

Monday the 21st of June, Wimbledon begins,and I would just like to remind everyone that Goldings were their ball boys for many years (1946-66) until the close of the school.Many of the ball boys actions were perfected at Goldings and it looks like present day ball boys and girls continue with the practice of which I follow with a certain pride knowing we were considered "The Best Ball Boys in the World" a quote from Manuel Santana,a Wimbledon finalist of the day.I myself never went due to "Bad Behaviour" in the three years I was at Goldings,and was considered by Mr Nixon (he trained us and picked them) that I may loose the good name of the school down! which could never be!Even so, at our reunions many of past incidents are recalled.How they used to sell the famous players sweat bands to the public,also the school was never short of tennis balls!.Tips from the public were hidden in your socks which wouldn't make a noise otherwise they had to be shared by the most senior boy there.The first disabled ball boy was Mike Jarvis (early 50's) who worked the score board with only one arm! When a squirrel ran onto Centre Court,captured by a Ball Boy,but promptly bitten.In my era when the Line Judge fell asleep and was gently woken by a Ball Boy which became front page news 1964.Apparently they had a large lunch,washed down with wine,coupled with a very sunny day!at that age you do tend to fall asleep,but surely not at Wimbledon!In the very early days when Gorgeous Gussy decided to wear "frilly pants",the old timers at our reunions still to this day recall with relish such a wonderful bonus to their experience,but quickly banned by Wimbledon Official's!Robinson's Barley Water was the preferred drink to any other at Goldings in that fortnight another bonus to add to.How the Americans approached Mr Wheatley (the headmaster) to borrow the then ball boys for American Tournements but refused on the grounds that it would be unfair to the rest of the boys left behind (there was at this time 200 pupils in the school and on average 60 went to Wimbledon)A very fair man indeed! Dave


Reply ID 81804

19/06/2011 by Dave

Wimbledon Fortnight A MONTH or two before the Wimbledon Amateur Tennis Championships begin, about one hundred boys train strenuously to be picked as ball-boys. The numbers are gradually whittled down to around seventy boys who are considered to be the 'cream'. The list of the courts to which the boys have been allocated goes up on the notice board a few days before the start of the Wimbledon fortnight, and there follows a mad rush to see who are on what courts. Before the actual fortnight begins we go to Wimbledon for two practice days and everyone gets excited at the thought of doing ball-boy for great tennis stars. Soon Monday comes round for the beginning of the fortnight, everyone is tense and keen but the journey in the coaches seems to take hours. When we eventually arrive at Wimbledon we all cram into the small ball-boy room and get changed, then we go up to have our dinner which is salad. This tastes scrumptious for the first few days but after a week we begin to feel like rabbits. The hands on the clock gradually creep round to a quarter to two and we all make our way to our individual courts. The players arrive and start to 'knock up' and we, the ball-boys, start our work. When we first start as ball-boys we feel very conscious of all the people watching and if we make a mistake we feel embarrassed, but soon this feeling wears off and we soon feel very much at home on the court. Many of the boys are asked which games they like best, men's, women's, doubles or singles. I think that the men's games are the more exciting because they are very fast and the placing of shots is much better, whereas the women tend to stand on the baseline and keep hitting the ball to each other until one of them hits out or into the net. Both men's, women's, and mixed doubles are always fast and exciting to watch. A popular male player among the boys this year was Rod Laver, a very fine player (although unseeded) from Australia who did well in the men's singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. His partner in the latter was Miss Darlene Hard who was one of the most popular female players among the boys. As the players get eliminated from the championships so less courts are needed and fewer boys are required each day, until the last two days when only the Centre, Number 1, and a couple of outside courts require manning. These last two days are the most exciting for the ball-boys who are left, as the semi-finals and finals are then played. The best of all the finals I think was the men's doubles when R. Emerson and N. Fraser beat R. Mark and R. Laver, all of whom were Australian. And so Wimbledon is over and a tired group of boys make their last journey home for another year, but before we know where we are we shall be training with boys who have been before and new boys, all who will be trying to get to Wimbledon next year. D. HILTON and A. KNIGHT The Goldonian 1959


Reply ID 81903

26/06/2011 by Dave

A BOY'S IMPRESSIONS OF WIMBLEDON As this is my third year at Wimbledon I have decided to write an article consisting of my impressions of this great place. On entering the gates of Wimbledon you find yourself in a paradise of colour, sunshine and gaiety. The ladies' summer frocks, the well kept Tennis Lawns—the only one of their kind—the tea lawns with tables and gay coloured sun-shades, the neat and trim hedges, the well set out flower gardens with the colours of red, white and blue and even a bright red Post Office caravan is part of the settings. The Centre Court from the outside is a marvellous and impressive sight. It is surprising how large it really is. It stands quite high and there are tiers of balconies looking out to the outside courts and giving you a bird's-eye-view of this well-known tennis ground. The whole outside of Centre Court is covered with ivy which gives it added charm. The inside of the Centre Court tells a different story. It is on this turf that all the famous players of the world have played. To some it has meant victory and fame, to others, defeat. To many it has meant years of hard training and skill and they either win and make a name for themselves or lose and so lose the thing they have tried so hard to win. To the spectators, Wimbledon is a grand day out. A good sport and worth watching. Little can they realise, as they see two players enter the court that one must go of with triumph and glory and the other must leave with a heavy heart and a lost game. As I end, let me bring to your mind a few lines from Rudyard Kipling's "If". If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss. J. W. S. The Goldonian Summer 1954


Reply ID 81904

26/06/2011 by Dave

Lawn Tennis Towards the close of last summer our School was invited to become an affiliated member of the Hertfordshire Lawn Tennis Association. The invitation came from the Hon. Secretary of the Hertfordshire L.T.A., Mr. G. R. Dunning, who, impressed by the performance of the ball-boys at Wimbledon last year, himself offered to pay the necessary subscription for the next three years, Our sincere thanks go to Mr. Dunning for this kind offer, which was accepted and for the interest he has shown in the School. During the coming season therefore, the School is to have for the first time a tennis team. At first the team will be a mixed one comprising Staff and Boys paired, but it is intended, once the boys have gained in experience, to play one or two matches, fielding a purely boys' team. In tennis as in all other games natural ability is not sufficient, practice is essential and any boy who hopes to "make the team," must be prepared to work hard in order to be chosen. The summer season, so far as Lawn Tennis is concerned, will be an experimental period, but it is hoped an enjoyable one. Whilst we may not exactly astound the people of Hertfordshire with tales of our success, still I trust that taking part in competitive tennis will arouse throughout the School a greater interest in the game. So far seven evening fixtures have been arranged, both home and away, as follows:.— 22nd May Eastern Electricity Board Home 29th May Hertford L.T.C Home 5th June County Hall Home 13th June I.C.I., Welwyn Away 10th July County Hall Away 15th July Hertford L.T.C Away 24th July Eastern Electricity Board Home K. T. S. N.


Reply ID 82158

10/07/2011 by Dave

THE GOLDONIAN LOCAL TOPICS 'Our Home' LOOKING BACK over our long and uphill struggle to improve the home life of our boys it is extremely uplifting to walk around the School today and to be able to see so many improvements in the actual living conditions of both boys and staff. It is most encouraging to note the responsibility and pride that the greater majority of boys show towards the cleaning of their particular house. The dining hall, which has so often been referred to as our 'black spot', has taken on a new look. I feel sure the boys are now enjoying their meals and appreciating the improved standard. The gay tablecloths have added colour and refinement and are a refreshing acquisition to the older bare-topped tables. We hope in the future to gradually introduce even better table equipment and are relying on the co-operation of all boys and staff to make the room a place we can all be proud of. This month has seen the fulfilment of a long-cherished ambition to enrich our family with houseparents for each of our five houses. In this we have been fortunate, as the results in such a short time have been so gratifying that the future looks very 'rosy'. It is now up to each one of us to strive towards the perfection of 'Our Ideal Home'. MATRON 1961


Reply ID 82208

18/07/2011 by Dave

RETURN JOURNEY ONE OF the benefits of a boarding school education is the strong feeling of companionship which living together engenders. It is not surprising therefore that a great number of old boys revisit the School each term; in fact it is rare for a week-end to pass without having one or more staying with us. The staff and boys now at the School always extend to them a very cordial welcome, but it must frankly be admitted that a1 small number have worn their welcome very thin. When this happens, the old boy concerned is very apt to look around for someone to blame other than himself. Invariably the truth is that his motives for paying a visit are not the right ones. For the guidance of all present members of the School, who will join the ranks of old boys sooner or later, I think it helpful to say -something about the right reasons for returning and how to conduct oneself whilst here. There is a very natural curiosity to revisit the old familiar places. Those whose schooldays are long past often have a desire to show their girl-friends the scenes of their boyhood; some bring their wives and families with them-—an event which always gives great pleasure to long-service members of staff. It is also understandable that old boys like to show us that they have put their early training to good account. Although we do not measure success merely by material standards, we have a justifiable parental pride in the obvious signs of prosperity and good taste. Many an old boy enjoys a good yarn about old times and often recalls long forgotten incidents, including some that were not brought to light at the time they happened. Very frequently too, they freely admit their past misdemeanours and are glad to acknowledge the benefits they have reaped by being urged to persevere when the road seemed hard and they had wanted to give up. Now for some rules for you when you return to the School as old boys. First look to your dress and appearance and ask yourself whether you are a credit to the School. It is not just a question of modern fashions, which some young people can wear without looking ridiculous. No one expects you to wear the fashions of your elders. You can be smartly turned out in the style of the day, so long as you do not affect the ridiculous extremes, which disorderly youths wear as a kind of uniform. If you are unwashed, or dressed like a caricature in a comic strip, you are not paying respect to the School and can hardly expect to feel very welcome. Happily such returnees are the exception to the rule, but we have all seen examples. If you wish to stay the night, it is only politeness to write or telephone and ask if it would be convenient. If you do stay overnight, or for a few days, you are expected to make a modest contribution towards your entertainment. No old boy with self-respect comes back to School just for free meals or cheap accommodation. Whilst enjoying the hospitality of the School, you are expected to enter into the life of the family, which entails attendance at Morning Prayers and School Chapel services. If you do not do so you are losing an opportunity to give that support to the staff which they are entitled to expect from you. It is entertaining and also instructive to listen to the comments of old boys who return after a long absence. Invariably they consider the present generation are 'feather-bedded', though in fact the beds are made of foam rubber. Probably as boys they grumbled fiercely at the conditions under which they 'suffered' and which have now been 'remedied'. Nevertheless, many are firmly convinced they were all the better for having lumpy beds to sleep on, rough oak boards to polish and a mad scramble to get to the primitive showers during the first two minutes before the water ran cold. They consider linoleum covered floors, plenty of hot water, slipper baths, foam-rubber mattresses, and wooden bedsteads modern decadence in school life. They and the gentlemen with the despatch cases, so concerned for the comfort of boys, very seldom get together, but if such a meeting could be arranged I for one would like to listen-in to the exchanges. It would be too ingenuous to suppose that everything is said in earnest, for Goldings boys have always been noted leg-pullers. Still, I think they are perfectly sincere when they say, 'It was rougher in my day, but it didn't do me any harm'. The ideas and principles built into a boy's character will always remain more important than his physical comfort. RFW Summer 1962


Reply ID 82209

18/07/2011 by Dave

'THIS TIME NEXT WEEK' THE ABOVE title may not mean anything to many boys, but I have no doubt some of our adult readers will have seen the reviews on this book which was written by Leslie Thomas, an Old Boy of the Homes, and who spent some time here at Goldings during the war. The book tells his own story of what life in Barnardo's is like as seen through the eyes of a boy, and includes accounts of happy, sad, amusing, and even embarrassing times, but there is no self pity! All people mentioned in the book are real people, and no doubt the Gaffer (Mr. Gardner), Porky, Chesty, Earole, Tiptoe, etc., will all recognize themselves. I do not know if any of the above were at Goldings.) Despite the fact that Leslie Thomas has now made his mark in the world, and in particular the newspaper world, he obviously is in no way ashamed to let people know that his upbringing was in Dr. Barnardo's Homes. What a pity so many try to hide this fact. Today Leslie is a feature writer on London's Evening News. He covered the Eichmann Trial, and was in the official press party during the last Royal visit to Australia. He has had a play produced on B.B.C. Television, and is a broadcaster of note. A few months ago he recorded a programme on life in a Children's Home, and he chose his old Home, Kingston. He is married with two children and lives in Watford. N. T. P. Summer 1964


Reply ID 82376

28/07/2011 by Dave

MR. L. FARNHAM MR. L. FARNHAM joined the Carpentry Department, Goldings, in January, 1951, and unlike many of us, is a real 'local', being a member of a well-known Hertford family. He served his time to carpentry with Messrs. Ekins, a firm of building contractors, and during his apprentice period he studied and obtained a final City and Guilds certificate in his trade. In September, 1940, he joined, or was persuaded to join the R.A.F. and was trained as an air frame fitter; one of the chaps with a bit of string who kept the kites flying. In the period between his war service and joining us he gained some valuable experience of mass production methods within the motor industry and his shop's production figures for school wardrobes bear witness to this acquired knowledge. If ever we needed proof of his skill as a craftsman, or of his considerable knowledge of the building industry, these were clearly shown when he transformed a desolate area of scrubland into a really beautiful garden surrounding a very desirable house. A major achievement and nearly a one-man effort (apologies Mrs. Farnham, a two-man effort). Not a person to seek the limelight, but always most reliable; a first-class tradesman and a very competent instructor, which very many boys have reason to be grateful for. W.B. Goldonian Winter 1963


Reply ID 82522

07/08/2011 by Dave

Visit of Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret TUESDAY AFTERNOON, 18th October, 1960, at approximately 3 p.m. Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret, President of our Homes, stepped from her Rolls Royce to commence her visit to our School. The sun was shining, and by so doing made the perfect setting for us to receive our President, and I am sure her first impressions could only have been of wonderment as she appreciated the wonderful natural surroundings in which our Home is set. The Mayor of Hertford, Councillor F. Herniman, J.P., as senior official of the Borough, received Her Royal Highness, and he in turn then presented the following officials and their wives to Her Royal Highness: The Mayoress of Hertford, Mrs. F. Herniman; The Town Clerk of Hertford, Mr. A. I. Clough, and Mrs. Clough; The High Sheriff of Hertfordshire, Brigadier R.N.Hanbury.C.B.E., T.D., and Mrs. Hanbury; The Chairman of The Hertfordshire County Council, Mr. E. J. Baxter; The Clerk of The Hertfordshire County Council, Mr, A. Neville Moon, and Mrs. Moon; The Chief Constable of Hertfordshire, Lieutenant-Colonel A. B. Wilcox, O.B.E., and Mrs. Wilcox; Mr. A. G. B. Owen, C.B.E., Chairman of Council of Dr. Barnardo's Homes. Mr. Owen then took over the official duties and presented the following officials of the Homes to Her Royal Highness: The Reverend W. Eugene Charles, M.A., Member of Council of Dr. Barnardo's Homes; Mr. R. Ian Milne, M.A., M.B., B.CH., M.R.C.P., Member of Council, and Mrs. Milne; Mr. E. H. Lucette, M.C., B.A., General Superintendent; Mr. F. J. Potter, F.C.A., General Secretary; Mr. Theodore F. Tucker, Deputy General Superintendent; Dr. C. V. Bloom, B.A., M.B., B.S., Chief Medical Officer; Mr. G. A. Seabrook, F.C.C.S., Deputy General Secretary, Mr. J. E. A. Bazalgette, Chief Executive Officer; Councillor L. B. Keeble, J.P., Chairman of the Goldings Committee, and Mrs. Keeble; Mr. James Maslin, Secretary of the School; Mr. R. F. Wheatley, B.SC., Headmaster of the School, and Mrs. Wheatley. After the presentations Mr. and Mrs. Wheatley then conducted Her Royal Highness into the main building, where the Princess was invited to sign the Visitors' Book, and was shown the signature of her uncle The Duke of Windsor (then Prince of Wales) when he officially opened the School in November 1922. The Princess then walked across the courtyard, where the School Army Cadet Unit, under the command of Captain A. P. Culver, formed a Guard of Honour, and behind whom were assembled all boys not on duty, and members of staff and their families. On the new grass lawn outside the new wing were' assembled some 300 invited guests, who also had a wonderful view of Her Royal Highness as she walked up the steps and along the approach to the main entrance of the new wing. Outside the main door the School Captain, Malcolm Stevens, presented Her Royal Highness with the Golden Key to the MacAndrew Wing, and the doors opened and Her Royal Highness entered to be greeted by the Housemaster, Mr. Aldous. Mr. Owen then took the opportunity of presenting the following people to Her Royal Highness: Mr. H. Hall, DIPL.ARCH., DIPL.T.P., A.R.I.B.A., Chief Architect of Dr. Barnardo's Homes; Mr. W. H. Heard, representing the contractors who built the wing, Messrs. George Mott and Sons; Mr. L. Embleton, Deputy Headmaster of the School, and Mrs. Embleton, Chief Matron of the School. Her Royal Highness was then conducted through the whole of the new wing, and then through the new corridor into the old building, through Aberdeen dormitory to the first floor landing and then down the main stairway to the assembly rooms, where the Princess inspected the Exhibition of Work displayed by the Shops, School and Home. During her tour of the Exhibition, the Princess took a great interest in all she saw, and conversed with all the boys and staff who were on duty at their respective stands. Mr. H. W. Tempest, head of the Carpentry Department, presented Her Royal Highness with a table lamp made in the department by Terry Cooper. Tea was served at 3.45 p.m., and once more the Princess was able to meet more boys and staff. Our Senior Housemaster and one boy from each house spent some minutes with her during tea. The lucky boys were: Ronald Smith, Peter Beresford, Roy Capon, Terence Whitehead, and Harold Holberry. David Bird, who left us some weeks before, made a special trip back to be presented to Her Royal Highness, as he was the boy who made the coffee table, which was part of the wedding present given to the Princess and Mr. Anthony Armstrong Jones. As Her Royal Highness prepared to depart, John Bassett, one of the youngest members of the School, presented her with a bouquet, and as the car carried Her Royal Highness through the archway, the School Captain led everyone in three lusty cheers, plus many more as everyone picked up the lead. As one looked round amongst the crowd, one could sense a feeling o| happiness and I perhaps relief, because everything had gone according to plan, and when so many people have spent so many hours planning, planning, planning, what greater reward can they ask except—success, and this had really been a successful occasion. We were all captured by the charm and understanding of the Princess, who carried out her duties with complete efficiency, and we are all agreed that it was the Princess who had the most difficult job to do, facing and talking to so many people she had never seen or heard of before, and showing such knowledgeable interest in trades that she could only have read about before. I am sure we all learned a lot from the example set by our President. Having described, very briefly I am afraid, all that happened on that auspicious Tuesday, let me give you some facts about the new wing. "A. It was built in just over eighteen months, which in itself was quite a feat, when one remembers the amount of earth that had to be cut out, and the amount of concrete that had to be put in as footings for the building to stand on, as well as the trees that had to be uprooted. The cost has been something over £20,000, apart from all the fittings that had to go into such a building. It is a lot of money, but its purpose warrants every penny spent. Thirty-five boys and several staff will be housed completely in that wing for many years to come. So when somebody writes the notes about MacAndrew House in twenty years' time, he may be able to give some details as to the numbers that have passed through the house since its beginning, then we can really count the cost. The wing has been named MacAndrew in memory of the late Mr. D. J. MacAndrew, who for many years served as a Member of Council and on the Goldings Committee, and was a great friend to Goldings boys. In fact a great many of our improvements have been made possible by the generosity of the MacAndrew family, including the building of our Chapel in 1923. One last word of praise, and this time to our gardening department, who laid out the scrubland next to the new wing in such a short time and to such good effect. The grass, the shrubs, the rose trees and the trailing nasturtiums were all a picture to behold, and as can be seen from the picture of the new wing in the art supplement they really set the building up. N. T. P. As you entered Goldings via the archway "Macandrew" wing was to the right.It has since been demolished as it wasn't part of the listed building,and is now an underground car park for the residents,but if you inspect a little closer the end of the arch, remanants of the building can still be seen to remain on further scrutiny. Dave.


Reply ID 82749

21/08/2011 by Dave

REFLECTIONS NEVER BEFORE in our life-time has so much meaning been attached to the old greeting, "A Merry Christmas". After four years of war, years of terrible strain and anxiety, people everywhere are needing a message of hope and peace. "To them that sit in darkness", so runs the ancient prophecy, "hath light shined". It is always at the time of man's greatest need that God shows Himself. And to-day, while the conflict rages round the world, when whole countries are enslaved by the conqueror, and men are grappling in bitter strife; in this hour of darkness, we turn wistfully, but with confident hope, to that light which shone first on the hills of Judah. In the story of Bethlehem, the story of God coming into the lives of men, we still find our greatest consolation. "Peace on earth to men of goodwill" — here is the remedy for all our ills. So, to-day, we wish each other: "A Merry Christmas", and in our wishing there is a great yearning that this Christmas and the coming New Year may see the dawn of God's Peace for Mankind. At Goldings, the year has passed very quietly. There is nothing outstanding to record, except, perhaps, that in August, owing to the generosity of the Council of the Homes and the kindness of many foster-mothers, we were able to close the School for three weeks and every boy had a real summer holiday. The year has seen two special changes in the Staff: the appointment of Lieut. J. E, James, D.S.C., R.N., as Executive Officer, and of the Rev. K. S. Procter, M.A., as Chaplain. These two appointments have very greatly strengthened our work and widened the opportunities offered to every boy here to use his time at Goldings for development of soul, mind and body for the years to come. We have constantly remembered in our Chapel and at Daily Prayers the many Old Boys who are serving their country in all parts of the world, and, not least, in war-factories at home. Already, I have had very welcome greetings from prisoners-of-war, from the Middle East, from Ceylon and from Italy. Unfortunately, some of those who are kind enough to write do not add their addresses, so it is impossible to acknowledge their cards. But we do feel our fellowship with, them all, and our common life is made richer by their thoughts of us and ours of them. F. C. Macdonald Governor Goldings 1943


Reply ID 82999

03/09/2011 by James007

Dave Have you seen this? http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=19701


Reply ID 83038

04/09/2011 by Dave

Many thanks James,Barnardo's gave me a copy,but the date on the memorial stone was incorrect as it was opened on the 17th the aniversary of the death of William Baker not the 15th which has been carved in the stone.The stone has now vanished and no one seems to know what happened to it along with the stained glass windows in the chapel,but thank you very much for showing such interest in my former school and home.If you read on our site http://www.goldings.org the wonderful story of Charles Zakarov on our History Page,who on that day locked himself in the huts up top field and refused to come out as he wanted to go to Australia, which after talking to the Prince via the hut (which is on my copy)the Prince helped him get there! Dave.


Reply ID 83039

04/09/2011 by dutch knight

There is a link to the GOLDINGS website on this site(at the bottom) http://www.catweazle-fan.de/locations.htm#drs2 but unfortunately they have the address of Goldings as being in Kent. Quite a few other local places as well.


Reply ID 83109

06/09/2011 by Dave

In saying farewell, I address myself to the boys of Goldings and to my many friends on the staff. It would be hypocritical to pretend that there were not some boys whose behaviour was a source of constant anxiety for me. If I had not been worried, it would have meant that I did not care for them, but when all the truth is revealed, any fair-minded person is compelled to acknowledge that even the awkward squad are more sinned against than sinning. As for the majority of Goldings boys, both now and in the past, all they have ever needed was opportunity to develop their talents and they have done the rest. Their achievements have been most impressive and my mind is filled with happy recollections of them. Goldings has always been blessed with loyal and conscientious staff, many having put in half a life time at the work. Amongst comparative newcomers, too, there are men and women whose work for Barnardo boys will be sadly missed. I thank you all for your unfailing loyalty and support. It seems truly like the breaking up of a family, for that is how I have always thought of the Goldings folk. I am happy to know that many of you have improved your circumstances, sad though the parting was. I trust you will all eventually find success and happiness in your new fields of endeavour and that some of us, some time, will have the joy of meeting up again. R. F. WHEATLEY


Reply ID 83125

07/09/2011 by Dave

The last sentence of Mr Wheatley certainly reflects the friendship,and comaraderie we all gained at Goldings as again this year we all once more gather together in Hertford,Old Boys,Staff,Mr Wheatley's son,and for the first time due to ill health his Daughter! Yes the parting was sad,but some of us will have the joy of meeting once more! GOLDINGS RE-UNION, 1st OCTOBER,2011,44 years after much missed demise! Dave.


Reply ID 83338

18/09/2011 by Dave

A True Story IT WAS the Sunday School Anniversary at the Baptist Church. The church was packed with parents and friends who had gone to listen to the children singing, reading, and taking part in the service. As the preacher started to give his sermon he held up a big hold-all bag full of wrapped parcels. He asked one little boy to choose and unwrap a parcel. The child did so, and held up a lovely jewel case. The preacher opened the case and showed the congregation a lovely looking necklace but on closer examination it was discovered that the necklace was very cheap and tawdry and of very little value. The theme of the sermon was 'Things are not always what they seem'. Next, a little girl chose a tightly wrapped parcel marked 'Treasure', but when she undid it, she discovered an old shoe; The sole and the upper had parted company and the poor shoe looked a sorry sight. There was great amusement in the congregation as the shoe was held up. The preacher said to the little girl 'That "treasure" isn't any good to anybody, is it?' The little girl looked solemnly at him and said: 'You could give that to our Goldings boys and they could mend it.' Now she is just a very little girl, but she stood up in front of all those people and in that one sentence had declared her love, her complete trust, belief, and faith in you all. Try never to let her down D. M. H.


Reply ID 83339

18/09/2011 by Dave

WIMBLEDON LAWN TENNIS BALL BOYS As this is my third successive year at Wimbledon as a ball boy, and also that I am School Captain, might account for the Editor asking me to write something in this magazine relating to ball boys at the All-England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon. This event has been. held annually since before the beginning of this century, and was followed with very keen interest by tennis enthusiasts of many countries. It is with no less interest that the publication of the, Headmaster's choice of boys to attend this ever popular sporting event is awaited. Quite apart from the very welcome remuneration we receive for our services, it is not difficult to realise the reason for the boys being so keen to be chosen to attend. All boys who have any sense of appreciation regard being selected a ball boy ;is a very great and personal privilege. When one considers that only just over fifty boys are chosen for this very important job, and that— out of all the buys of eligible age attending Secondary, Grammar and Technical Schools mid Colleges in this country our School has for several years, past been asked by the officials of Wimbledon to provide boys, it cannot be denied that it is indeed a very great distinction for our School, Few boys have the opportunity to display their ability before Royalty and other distinguished personages, but surely is the luck of ball boys. All the while the matches are in progress, the ball boys are in full view of the spectators, and also to the viewers of television. On several occasions we observed Her Majesty Queen Mary sitting alongside the Prime Minister and M.rs. Attlee, and seated behind them were the Foreign Secretary, the Rt. Hon. Herbert Morrison, M.P., and the Lord Privy Seal, Mr. Richard Stokes, M.P. Encouraging and appreciative comments about us were frequently given on the radio and television programmes, and occasionally in the press. A short article under the heading "The Boys who love Wimbledon," by Steve Roberts, appeared in the Evening News on Thursday, 5th July, together with photographs of Derek (Snowy) Pain and myself. The ball boys job, as most readers know, is to retrieve balls and to service the players without delay. Like the tennis judges, they must stand in certain recognised positions on the courts in readiness for action. A wide red belt distinguishes the ball boys on the Centre Court from their colleagues on duty on the outer courts. Last July the journey to and from Wimbledon was made every day by motor coach. Immediately before starting on the outward daily journey each boy had a shower bath. On arrival at Wimbledon all boys and masters reported to the ball boys' room. Soon afterwards lunch was taken, alter which we reported to the ball boys' room, where our names were on a chart showing the number of the court on which we had to report. At 1.45 p.m. we each collected a card and proceeded to our various positions. Later in the afternoon we went to tea at an opportune time. Lunch and tea were served to us free of charge by the Wimbledon authorities. The masters in charge of us on different days during the period 25th June to 7th July were the Headmaster, Deputy Headmaster, Messrs. G. H. White, R. Moss, M. B. Smith and R. F. Leason. The departure from Wimbledon was usually just after 8.0 p.m. On the homeward journey the master in charge of the coach served each of us with two or three biscuits. School was generally reached about 10.o p.m., and supper was waiting for us. Now that our work at Wimbledon is over, I think all can be confidently certain that we. upheld the School motto which is embodied in the badge on our green blazers, "Finis Coronat Opus", i.e., "The end crowns the work." LEONARD P. MOTT, School Captain.


Reply ID 83844

12/10/2011 by Dave

GOING DOWN CONCERT On Friday, 15th December, we held our annual Christmas going-down concert in the gymnasium. Most of the school were fortunate enough to attend. Mrs. Stackwood announced the items, the first one being a one-act play by Mr. Smith's drama group entitled, ' 'Thread O'Scarlet.'' Next Philip Arends sang ' 'The Holy City", which received a roar of applause from his many fans. After this, there was a light-hearted sketch, written by J. Langdon entitled, "Mr. Corbett's Art Class." This brought many bursts of laughter from the audience, especially when J. Langdon and T. Adcock ended this sketch with words to the well-known strains of "Much Binding in the Marsh." Following this was a short sketch entitled "N.S.E.W." Though short it was very comical and the artists taking part were, T. Adcock, R. Haldenby and R. Penney. Again we were treated to more laughter, this time by a sketch called "Sardines." This sketch was shown at Edmonton in a gang-show, but though "second hand" it received full applause. The artists (all from Mr. Smith's drama group) were: D. Godfrey, R. Dean, W. Cotten, J. Jenkins and T. Noble. Following this, A. Bailey gave a recitation of "Meg Merrilies" the well-known poem by John Keats. Once more T. Adcock appeared in a short snappy conjuring act, helped by J. Battersby, "Song and Patter" was the next item, the artists being P. Alsemgeest and B. Longley. This was a short snappy sketch of two spivs, where a song was presented and also a comic poem, with apologies to Mr. Wheatley. This ended the comic sketches and the next item was given by a boy from the Verney, "Fuzz" Foley, who played the harmonica. He played his own version of "12th Street Rag," and also a few more popular tunes. A welcome surprise was the next item, entitled, "Meet Mrs. Beeton." This was a one-act play presented by Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Tordoff, and Mrs. Maslin. As a very fitting finale the stage was set as the interior of a house, with carol singers as guests, the host and hostess being none other than Mr. and Mrs. Wheatley. During this scene many solo parts were performed: recitation by R.Price; clarinet solo by D. C. Williams; and a carol by P. Arends and E. Goodger.The show ended with the customary National Anthem. Many thanks are due to the following: Mrs. R. Stackwood, Mr. M. B. Smith, Mr. F. Tordoff (Concert Sub-Committee); Mr. W. Broster (Stage Manager); Mr. H. Mitchell (Accompanist); and all who gave their full co-operation and help. P. PARRY. Goldings 1951


Reply ID 84252

24/10/2011 by Dave

GOLDINGS - by an Old Boy. As an old Goldonian I should like to give my impressions of Goldings now, as compared with the days I spent there as a boy, and which I now regard as the happiest days of my life. After 30 years absence I was amazed at the changes that have taken place. The Island where we used to sit under trees and read our books and comics is now the Sick Bay; the School Block is also a new addition, this was once an orchard, and needless to say very popular when the fruit was ripe. I also noticed that houses have been built for the staff of the School, and was told that they were built by the boys; where these houses now stand was a beautiful green field where we used to sun-bathe, and directly behind (which is now ploughed up) was our football field. Our allotments were to the right of this field and each term prizes were given for the best kept plot. I was delighted to see that the boys now have the benefit of a lovely open air swimming pool, which was something we didn't have in our day. The glass observatory at the extreme end of the School was our Tuck Shop where we could buy cakes and cups of tea and sit round little tables and enjoy them. One relic that was missing was the Fretwork Shop. I can remember the time when the Chapel was built; I also remember when His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales stood at the corner of the terrace and gave a speech and his theme was "Playing the Game". When I went into the present Dining Room my mind went back to the Saturday mornings when we used to scrub the table tops white and put them out on the parade ground to dry, then clean all the cutlery and lay it out for inspection. While this was being inspected we all went back to the hall, took off our boots and stockings, got out the bass brooms, and as the hall master turned on the fire hose, we would scrub the floor and then get down on our hands and knees and wipe the floor dry with cloths. After dinner on a Saturday at 1 o'clock we were paraded and collected our weekly town passes for the afternoon, but we had to be back at School by 8.30 p.m. sharp! Our School Chaplain at that time was the Rev. Guildford and he played fairly regularly at centre-half for the School team, which was a really good side and won more games than they lost. The parades that bored us. most were the boot inspections and haircutting and these I believe have now been done away with. The room over the archway was the "Prefects' Den", the Staff Dining Room was No. 1 classroom, the Staff Kitchenette was the Dispensary and Dental Room. Sliding-door lockers, where the boys clean laundry was kept, were situated at the end of the long passage leading down to the main kitchen, and this laundry was collected every Friday night on our way to bed at 7.30 p.m. On Sunday afternoons we had what we called P.S.A. (pleasant Sunday afternoon) which was a weekly concert party, and something we all enjoyed very much. The Headmaster in those days was the Rev. F. C. Macdonald, formerly a chaplain to the forces. To come up to date with my observations I think the present boys have a much better time than we did. I noticed the lads with huge dinners followed by a variety of deserts. I understand from the Chef (also an Old Boy) that the boys get something different every day. I also formed the opinion that the majority of boys were well satisfied with the treatment they received from the staff and felt they were fortunate in having such reasonable people to look after them. D F 1928 Goldonian Summer 1958


Reply ID 84485

09/11/2011 by Dave

"The Goldonian"—by an American The undermentioned notes were received by Christopher Pettman from his American pen-friend. They make interesting reading amd should act as a stimulant to all would-be subscribers to know that our Magazine does get so far afield. ED. "Reviewing recent issues of THE GOLDONIAN I seemed to detect an air of friendliness about it—the usage of knick-names, an under-current of closeness that isn't felt in most of our American annuals, quarterlies, etc. "You seemed to be closer to your-alumni than we are. I've noted, also, an esprit de corps in your intra-murals which is exciting. The articles of interest, particularly 'A Queer Language', and 'How Cricket Began', is something which might interest several American teenagers like myself. "The Chaplain's notes are very inspiring and a duplication could be used 'states-side'. "In short we American teens dig your mag. We think it's the 'most, to say the least!'. "I think a bit more space could be devoted to mentioning the extra-curricular events which kill spare the boys. American readers would be interested to note how our interests vary." ROBERT N. BOYD New Printing Machine It was through the kind interest of Mr. A. G. B. Owen, C.B.E., that a new and interesting addition was made to the equipment in the Printing Department at Goldings during this term. It is a "Harrison Verticle" letterpress machine, a type of machine that we have not previously had at the School. This machine has been developed by Messrs. T. S. Harrison and Sons Ltd. since the war. It should give opportunity for experience of verticle machines to some of our machine apprentices. The'"Harrison Verticle" is a fast running automatic letterpress printing machine and we have had it fitted with Ault Wiborg anti-offset powder spray. The size of sheet that the machine will print varies between 6in. x 4in. and 12in. x 18in. The machine is fitted with constant speed motor drive and the snap-on pulleys give a wide range of printing speeds. Mr. Owen's interest took the practical form of arranging that the machine was made available to us on very generous terms and we urn grateful to him. The School Magazine The "Goldonian" Winter Term 1958


Reply ID 84645

20/11/2011 by Dave

CHRISTMAS DAY, 1953 Once again Christmas day passed without being a "white one", but in actual fact there have been very few white Christmas's in this country. So, regardless of various tales of snowbound Christ-mases, you'll find the records are to the contrary. At Goldings, although it was not a "white one" it was a "good one" and I haven't heard anyone say otherwise. This was mainly due to the first-class co-operation of boys and staff. The boys worked keenly the days before, decorating, polishing, etc. so the day of rejoicing should be as free as possible. The staff, at this time of the year have a very big job on hand, and I think they made our Christmas one of the best at Goldings. We started at the School and the Verney by the traditional tea in bed, being kindly served by staff to the boys. Then later on, a little tidying up, looking through held-over parcels, nut cracking, eating, eating, eating, then we all dressed up smartly for our Christmas Day Service in the school chapel. This was enjoyed by all, of the many present. The popular tunes of carols swelled over the otherwise quiet grounds of Goldings. A short service this, with a sermon by our chaplain, Rev. S. C. Corbett, and then everyone filed out to await the big occasion. The boys, staff and apprentices congregated in the school-room and then the traditional 'old man' came in all his glory and presented us all with an individual present, all of which were very well thought-out and useful. It must be a very big job choosing about 2OO presents for boys from 13 yrs. to apprentice age of about 19 yrs. Anyway everyone was happy and the room was cleared and it was only a matter of 15 minutes before the boys were contentedly sitting down to a really fine dinner, again served to us by the staff. There was fruit after the Christmas pudding which was blown in by two buglers, and a drummer marching with it round the dining hall, as is our tradition. After this mighty feed the boys were given the choice of walking or sleeping it off, but I suppose you could still find hands sinking into food parcels, and still enjoying it. The tea was light but good, and afterwards the boys made their way to the old schoolroom for the evening party, where the day was really given its best in a very informal time. There were many funny items in the games' section, many enjoyable minutes in the eating session, and quite a unique difference in this year's party was that it included dances. The boys who had been in dancing lessons naturally being pleased at this opportunity of testing their skill. Mr. Culver, our senior housemaster and cadet officer, gave us some added enjoyment by including some of his sketches, and you know some of them are as old as the hills but they still go down very well indeed. They was a recitation by B. McCarthy of Gunga Din bringing everybody into a sober mood for a few moments. A good game for the staff was, guessing the hand, when lady members of the staff were put in an adjoining room and then just showed their hands through the door, the gentlemen staff then proceeded to guess which hand belonged to whom. This was a tense test for them as some of it involved man and wife, it was a very interesting spectacle for the onlookers to see who would emerge as winner. It ended with two drawing for first place, right down to some who did not guess even one! We had community singing accompanied by piano and accordion, then as time (the thing that hurries so much when you tike it to go slow, and drags so much when you want it to hurry), moved on we ended a really happy day with the okey cokey, etc., and stumbled up to bed. For this very enjoyable evening party we owe our thanks to the chefs and matron for food arrangements, and for the first class organisation by Mr. Offord, who is very good at looking after this kind of celebration. Mr. Patch, our old P.T.I, who has now retired was missed this Christmas, we are all very sorry to lose such a good member of the staff. On wishing him well in his retirement we also extend a warm welcome to his successor, Mr. Newbrooke, and hope he spends just as long and happy a time as Mr. Patch. On the whole it was a very enjoyable day, and I cannot close without again mentioning that it was only the good co-operation between staff and boys, and vice versa that made this Christmas one of the best. Try and always keep it like that. I'm sure it would pay dividends. Now a word of thanks to the Headmaster, Mr. Offord, the Chefs, and all who played any part at all in giving us such a wonderfully informal and happy day. Thanks a lot on behalf of all the boys, and may I wish everyone a really hot, and happy Easter. P. J. TABER The Goldonian, Spring 1954. (School Magazine)


Reply ID 84646

20/11/2011 by Dave

The "Flu Epidemic" Not long after the beginning of the Spring Term 1959, about ten boys were suddenly "laid up" in Sick Bay with influenza. Not long afterwards more boys went sick. Soon there were so many that the Headmaster gave permission for the Somerset first bay to be opened as an extension to the Sick Bay. Still more boys came in and soon the whole of the Somerset floor was full as well as the Sick Bay. For the orderlies it was a very hard time when all Somerset was full, running to and fro with bowls of water for the boys to wash in, making the beds and sweeping and polishing the floors. Nurse Underwood from the Sick Bay was on duty all the time, except for an hour or two in the afternoon when a master took over. Like Nurse Underwood, Sister Offord was on duty all the time in Sick Bay. A week or two later the numbers began to dwindle as more and more boys went convalescent and they were able to close the small Somerset bay so that only the two big Somerset bays were left. Some nurses from the County Red Cross came to help us out, and we were very grateful for their help. Also we were very grateful for the help given by Mrs. Nunn, Mrs. Stackwood, Mrs. Maslin and all other members of staff and their wives. The 'flu epidemic as it affected Goldings was so important that it was even reported on the front page of a local newspaper. BRIAN BALL The Goldonian, Spring 1959. (The School Magazine)


Reply ID 84912

03/12/2011 by Dave

An Old Boy Talks to the Printers ON THURSDAY, 8th October, 1959, Victor Barber, a Goldings Old Boy and a product of the Printing Department, gave a talk to the department in the Old Schoolroom. As well as outlining his own career since leaving the School he gave an interesting account of Canada,its opportunities and its In hour set-up allied to the printing industry. It would appear from his remarks that the qualifications most likely to advance one up the ladder is to he 'a good printer'. Technical Schools are few and far between and it is the Trade Union which has assumed responsibility for apprentice training.The printer in Canada rates alongside the doctor, junior lawyer, etc., in fact, he is middle-class and can cope with, buying a house, a car and life's necessities without too much strain. Victor Barber paid tribute to his training here and stressed that if he could become a foreman at twenty-seven years of age, the Golding's apprentice today, with so much longer in full training, should have little difficulty in holding a good job. Victor works in Vancouver, with a newspaper firm which produces daily and evening papers, papers which quite often contain sixty-four pages. (The paper boys must earn their cash in Canada!) After his address he invited questions and was soon busy supplying the answers. Mr. Millar thanked the speaker and wished him well on his return. R. S. Goldonian Winter 1959 (THe School Magazine printed each term)


Reply ID 84913

03/12/2011 by Dave

CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS There are many and varied customs attached to Christmas. Certain places in England claim to have originated our Christmas celebrations. Pride of place among these claimants goes to the ancient city of York. On Christmas Day in the year 627, King Edwin and his Court celebrated the king's conversion to Christianity by St. Paulinus. In the little wooden church, on the site of the present York Minster, a quantity of mistletoe was carried in to remind the newly converted of the heathen worship under the Druids. Mistletoe was originally a symbol of heathenism, and it was also used in witchcraft. At York, King Henry III and his Court held a mammoth feast at Christmastide. This Christmas feastival was a long drawn out affair, and often lasted for three weeks. People declared "open house" for this period of time, and the Barons threw open their castles to all who cared to visit and consume their food in vast quantities. The largest feast held in this country was at Cawood Castle, Selby, on Christmas Day in 1465. The feast was open to all who cared to come, and guests flocked in from far and wide. In the days'of feasting it is said that 104 oxen, 6 wild bulls, 1,100 sheep, 304 calves, and 301 wild boars, together with thousands of geese, poultry, pheasants, pigeons, and rabbits were eaten. At one time in England pigeons were especially kept for Yule-tide dishes. At Sibthorpe, Notts, and at Clifton near Nottingham, you can still see the pigeon cotes where the wild pigeons nested. These birds were caught and used for food when required, especially in Winter when meat was scarce. The Christmas Turkey, so prominent a dish now was introduced into this country in Tudor times. The; main dish before then was swan. From the hamlet of Boynton near Driffield went young William Strickland to serve as a cabin boy to Sebastian Cabot the explorer. In the New World, William Strickland caught a few turkeys, brought them back, and carefully reared them. They became a popular delicacy at the Christmas board. The Strickland family became prosperous and in their coat-of-arms William Strickland showed a turkey. Today in (Boynton Church you can see the Lectern in the form of a turkey with outspread wings. The turkey remains in the Stricklands of Boynton's coat-of-arms. The central figure of a commercial Christmas is Father Christmas or Santa Claus. In shops and chain-stores all over the country, weeks before Christmas, preparations are being made for the year's greatest festival. Advertisements appear in the national Press foi a "FATHER CHRISTMAS". This cloaked and hooded, benignly bearded, tenderly cheerful gentleman, is even tempted by the promise of "Good wages, and Staff Canteen". Father Christmas is hardly more than 100 years old, but in that comparatively short period he has become both a person and a symbol. He is a real person and the spirit of Christmas. But he is something more than this. For Father Christmas is a kind of universal father, not just a kindly guardian of the pleasures of children. In his dress, Father Christmas with scarlet hood and red coat is as established as John Bull in low-crowned topper, buff-topped breeches, and a Union-Jack waistcoat; or Uncle Sam with his stripped trousers, goatee beard and American-Flag-coloured hat. But wherever he may appear, he is always a welcome guest with children, and grown-ups too. Some time ago, a very conscientious, but unwise Chief Constable said that children singing carols in the streets were lawbreakers, and could be punished severely. Since that time children have continued singing carols, despite his warning; and good it is that they have ignored him. Carols are a necessary part of Christmas custom. As Scrooge discovered, you can't escape them once the season begins. How did we learn carols? We just "picked them up" somehow, as we did our Nursery Rhymes. They are part and parcel of the Christmas tradition, and like that loveable character Topsy, "they just growed". Carols are part of the lovely things that grow naturally out of the outburst of joy which surges through Christian hearts and minds at the thought of the gift of Jesus Christ on that first Christmas Day. Only a God-forsaken world could ever be sad at the season of Christmas. Norman Banks, an Australian commercial radio announcer, has composed a modern carol. This, with the old traditional carols is sung by candlelight in Melbourne's Alexandra Gardens, each Christmas Eve. The Columbia Recording is sold for the benefit of young victims of infantile paralysis, and also for blind children. Apart from the fact that this is a most wonderful contribution to suffering humanity, Norman Banks has the right spirit in the words of his carol: "Yuletide in Melbourne means mass jubilation. And carols by candlelight on Christmas Eve: Thousands assemble in glad dedication To hail Him with joy, and the vow I believe!" s.c.c. Goldonian Winter 1954 (THe School Magazine printed each term) Written by the Chaplain at Goldings Rev. S. C. Corbett.


Reply ID 85172

17/12/2011 by Dave

EX SCHOOL CAPTAIN ALAN CARR The following is an extract from a letter received at Stepney from Lt.-Commander Filer, R.N., also an old Barnardo boy. "The most outstanding member of my Ship's Company incidentally is an Ex-Watts and Ex-Goldings boy, one, Petty Officer A. J. Carr. He is well on the way to achieving promotion to Commissioned Officer, having achieved distinction in Navigation and Mathematics in Higher Education Tests, besides being outstanding as a Petty Officer and a Diver. Goldonian Spring 1956 (School Magazine)


Reply ID 85173

17/12/2011 by Dave

GOING DOWN CONCERT On Friday, i5th December, we held our annual Christmas going-down concert in the gymnasium. Most of the school were fortunate enough to attend. Mrs. Stackwood announced the items, the first one being a one-act play by Mr. Smith's drama group entitled, ' 'Thread O'Scarlet.'' Next Philip Arends sang ' 'The Holy City", which received a roar of applause from his many fans. After this, there was a light-hearted sketch, written by J. Langdon entitled, "Mr. Corbett's Art Class." This brought many bursts of laughter from the audience, especially when J. Langdon and T. Adcock ended this sketch with words to the well-known strains of "Much Binding in the Marsh." Following this was a short sketch entitled "N.S.E.W." Though short it was very comical and the artists taking part were, T. Adcock, R. Haldenby and R, Penney. Again we were treated to more laughter, this time by a sketch called "Sardines." This sketch was shown at Edmonton in a gang-show, but though "second hand" it received full applause. The artists (all from Mr. Smith's drama group) were: D. Godfrey, R. Dean, W. Cotten, J. Jenkins and T. Noble. Following this, A. Bailey gave a recitation of "Meg Merrilies" the well-known poem by John Keats. Once more T. Adcock appeared in a short snappy conjuring act, helped by J. Battersby. "Song and Patter" was the next item, the artists being P. Alsemgeest and B. Longley. This was a short snappy sketch of two spivs, where a song was presented and also a comic poem, with apologies to Mr, Wheatley. This ended the comic sketches and the next item was given by a boy from the Verney, "Fuzz" Foley, who played the harmonica. He played his own version of "i2th Street Rag," and also a few more popular tunes. A welcome surprise was the next item, entitled, "Meet Mrs. Beeton." This was a one-act play presented by Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Tordoff, and Mrs. Maslin. As a very fitting finale the stage was set as the interior of a house, with carol singers as guests, the host and hostess being none other than Mr. and Mrs. Wheatley. During this scene many solo parts were performed: recitation by R- Price; clarinet solo by D. C. Williams; and a carol by P. Arends and E, Goodger. The show ended with the customary National Anthem. Many thanks are due to the following: Mrs. R. Stackwood, Mr. M. B. Smith, Mr. F. Tordoff (Concert Sub-Committee); Mr. W. Broster (Stage Manager); Mr. H. Mitchell (Accompanist); and all who gave their full co-operation and help. P. PARRY. Easter 1951


Reply ID 85279

28/12/2011 by Dave

OLD BOY MAKES GOOD IN AUSTRALIA N.S.W. Australia 11th Oct., 1963 Dear Sir, The enclosed cutting will be sufficient to explain itself, if I may so modestly put it so. The purpose of writing to you, however, is to pass on to those concerned (alas! so long ago if they are still with you) that is the masters of the Printers at Goldings—that I am both proud and thankful for the manner, discipline, and above all the patience and skill they had in teaching me a trade that has taken me from one side of the world to the other. It seems a long time ago (30 years) since I first went to the W.B.T.S. at Goldings. The Reverend Macdonald was the Governor then, and the names that come to mind in the Printing shop were Mr. Wollen (Head), Mr. Riley, Mr. East, Mr. ? the reader and Mr. Penny, or has my memory of the years ago failed me? If there is any boy at Goldings now, who by his competence and with the will to work hard would like the opportunity, on completion of his apprenticeship, to come out to Inverell, in this wonderful land of opportunity called Australia, then ask him to write to me personally. A compositor with a particular flair for lay-out and initiative, would, and could by his own ability, succeed in his ambitious aims. In submitting the enclosed, may I say that it is not for personal pride alone but that in some small way it may serve as a tribute to my training, and to Dr. Barnardo's and those who did so much for me. May God's blessing be with all of you, as I know it has been with me. Yours faithfully (Signed) Charles Hemus


Reply ID 85314

03/01/2012 by Dave

The rumour of a murder by a Goldings boy Browsing on the computer I came across someone recalling coming to live in Hertford from London and his story about two Goldings boys who broke into our armoury and shot someone in Hertford! I have put this short story on our Goldings web-site http://www.goldings.org (Guest Book on the index)and it appears it may have been true as some of our Old Boys do recall the incident in the late 40's. I just wondered if any of the senior residents can remember the incident so I can add it to my research into Goldings History Dave Goldings 1962-65


Reply ID 85726

22/01/2012 by Dave

I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER . . . I CANNOT say these memories of Goldings are all in the right order, only the first ones and the last, the rest just come tumbling out of my memory store. I remember the day the boys came from Stepney, how they arrived at Hertford East Station and marched to Goldings led by the band, my father being the Bandmaster. It appeared as though all Hertford had turned out to see them and how wonderful it was for the boys to see Goldings for the first time with all the fields and trees, after the East End of London where they had only a courtyard in which to play their games. I can remember the visit of The Prince of Wales, the present Duke of Windsor, who came for the official opening of the School. The last and poignant memory was the sad and bewildering news that the Council of the Homes had decided to close the School. Now come the memories at random. An early memory is the building and dedication of the School Chapel. I remember the fetes we used to have in the grounds each summer. The people came in their hundreds and were entertained by the Band and the Gymnastic Team. There was cricket in the long days of summer. and watching football on the top field with the thermometer below freezing and an icy wind from the north east. I remember how staff and boys worked together to dig out the new swimming pool. Then there were the dark years of war. How hard and uncomfortable it was spending the nights in the trenches. There was the land mine that didn't go off, and the tragic night when one of the masters was killed and the corner of Clock House was blown away. I remember when The Verney was bought and converted into a home for the printer boys. In the days before television, what fun the staff had rehearsing plays, which were put on for the benefit of the boys, and I can remember too, many fine plays and other entertainments given by the boys for the enjoyment of the staff. It was a great day also when the boys were allowed to shed their uniforms and dress like any other boys. Shall we ever forget Sunny Dymchurch? What jokes were made about it, yet what happy times we had there. I remember the boys going to Wimbledon and the renown they brought to Barnardo's, when all the world could see the results of their good training. Not so very long ago the new wing was built and Princess Margaret came to open it. What a day that was and how proud we were of the magnificent display of fine craftsmanship. I remember a day in November, 1965, when the new schoolroom block was opened by Sir John Hunt. That was another occasion when everyone admired the skills which the boys had learned at Goldings. Who would have dreamt then that there was any thought of closure? For over forty years my life has revolved about Goldings and all that this home and school has meant. They are mostly happy memories and now in my home I have many things made by Goldings boys. I will always treasure them and REMEMBER. DORIS MASLIN (A member of Staff) The Goldonian 1967


Reply ID 86180

05/02/2012 by Dave

WHEN I first left my home to go to Stepney I felt very sorrowful. But on arriving at Stepney I was surprised to see that it was such a nice place. Of course there were plenty of alerts because it is war time. After being there a week I had to come to Goldings. When I arrived here I had to change and get into Goldings clothes. We have every Wednesday afternoon to play football, and in the evening we have pictures. During the Saturday afternoon we go to the town, most of us going to the Regent Cinema. During the winter we have competitions in the dormitories at night, and we have a very good time. P. ALLEN (Kinnaird). I WAS first at the Boys' Garden City, Woodford Bridge, and then I was transferred to Goldings to learn a trade. I am a spare boy at the moment but it will not be long before my turn comes to go into the shop which is Engineering. As a spare boy I have Arithmetic on Monday night, Engineering Class on Tuesday and English on Thursday. I like it very much here at Goldings; we are allowed to go to town on Saturday afternoons and go to the picture Palace or walk round the shops. A. HUNTLEY (Mount Stephen). The Goldonian March 1941


Reply ID 86688

04/03/2012 by Dave

LETTER FROM AUSTRALIA P.O. Box 56 Dalby, Q'ld Australia The Editor, THE GOLDONIAN Dear Sir and all at Goldings, May I first thank you for the magazine which is always a great joy to receive. This time, alas, it was not such a joy as it brought the news of Jim Maslin's passing. Yes, Jim Maslin, the idol of all the boys at Stepney. I remember him well, Mr. Marchant's son-in-law. I see him now doing sentry duty as we boys used to call it. There was a small sentry box at Stepney where he used to take his turn checking the boys out and in on Wednesday nights and Saturday afternoons. Yes, he was quite a guy. We never had to worry if we were a few minutes late getting in. No need to sneak past, a cheery wave and so to bed. What was there about this man that I (and I have no doubt so many others) should remember him so well after all these years? (I am over sixty.) All I can say is that Jim Maslin was placed by birth and character above the petty need of standing on his dignity. I would love to have his photo and I am sending the money for same under separate cover by surface mail. I have no doubt with the passing of time many changes have taken place at Goldings and it may well be that old faces could be forgotten. I used to play in the band under the baton of Mr. Marchant and like Jim I was present at the exodus from Stepney to Goldings. I emigrated to Australia from Goldings and have had a very varied and interesting life out here. I settled down in Dalby some thirty years ago and for the last twenty years I have been employed as a shop assistant in-the local pharmacy. My wife and I have reared a family of ten, four of whom are still at home and going to school. The others are married but they live quite near and are all doing well. After I first came out here I moved about quite a bit as it was hard to get a job in the depression, as a result I have seen quite a bit of the country. I have lately established contact with my family in Canada. I understand I was only three or four months old when I was admitted to the homes in Stepney. I was boarded out until I was ten and then went to Woodford. Then on to Stepney where I joined the band and so to Goldings. I have no doubt, Mr. Powell, you may recall the old song 'Playthings' which was a great favourite in the old days. It ran something like this: 'Right from the cradle and sweet baby joys, life plays with us like a child with its toys'. I think you will agree that this is quite true. Well sir and friends I have bored you quite enough. May I again thank you all and wish you all the best. May God have you all in his holy keeping. Please convey my deepest sympathy to Mrs. Maslin and her family. Perhaps the knowledge that someone so far away has always had a soft spot for Jim and remembered him may be of some help. God Bless. Very sincerely yours, D. MASSEY The Goldonian 1966 (School Magazine)


Reply ID 86933

21/03/2012 by Dave

FROM GUILD MESSENGER, JULY 1922 FETE AND CARNIVAL AT GOLDINGS ON AUGUST BANK HOLIDAY Great preparations are being made at our William Baker Technical School, Goldings, Hertfordshire, for a fete and children's carnival on Bank Holiday, 7th August We should be very pleased to see as many of our Old Boys and their families and friends as are able to attend. A varied programme is being supplied. There will be the Boys' Band, Pipers, Gymnasts, and Dancers, in which our Boys and Girls will take part. There will also be many side-shows such as hoopla, coco-nut shies, football kicking, skittles, hidden treasure, dart throwing, lucky dip, chicken raffle, etc. The price of admittance is 1s., including tax, and children will be admitted half-price. Tickets obtained beforehand are 9d. each. The nearest station to Goldings is Hertford and may be reached by the Great Eastern Railway.


Reply ID 86934

21/03/2012 by Dave

A TRIBUTE TO GOLDINGS The School How well I still remember Goldings during the years 1933 to 1937. The school captain in 1933 was Gwynn, and vice-captain, Levy, "Peanut" to most of us. These two were young men of dignity and personality; chosen for their integrity by The Reverend F. C. Macdonald, the "Governor" to all and sundry. Goldings had a strong football team, composed of masters and boys. Mr. Batell (Pompey) and his colleague Mr. Whitbread were the main stars. Many matches could be credited to these two, not forgetting Peanut Levy, the very agile goalkeeper, Yearwood, a stalwart not only on the football field but on the track as well. There were seven houses in those days, Aberdeen (my house), Mount Stephen, McCall, Cairns, Somerset, Kinnaird, and Buxton. House competitions were really keen and Mr. Cruickshanks is remembered by most Old Boys for his coaching and organizing abilities on the sports field. He turned out many a stylish batsman and googly bowler. The swimming galas were held in the river and even the dirty water never deterred the keen swimmers from creating records from time to time. Leisure What Old Boy doesn't remember the band hut where during the dark winter evenings we sat around the walls reading our favourite comics and the familiar routine of going around shouting "comic to swop". Our favourite comics were, "The Wizard", "Hotspur", and "Champion". In this hut was the prefects' room, where one could hear "It was on the beach at Bali Bali" or "Balalaika" squeaking out from an aged gramophone. As soon as any appreciable frost came there appeared a slide extending from the dining hall down the length of the playground to the hut, and after shop hours or evening classes, we would be belting furiously down the slide at all angles, on our haunches, on one leg, or as a team trying to knock the others away to the side. Those winter evenings never seemed too long, we always found plenty to do. On Saturday afternoons one would see an exodus from Goldings to Hertford and it was certain that most boys would be going to the "Flea Pit" to watch their favourite cowboy on the screen, Bot Steel or Tom Mix. The long walk back to Goldings was always fortified by a pennyworth of broken biscuits or a bottle of pop. Saturday evening was picture night, and often during the showing of the old silent films "Laurel and Hardy" or "The Keystone Cops", one could hear, between laughter, the munch of boys eating apples, invariably scrumped from Titmus Orchard. How many Old Boys remember the Joe Patch Saturday afternoon "wet shirt", the penalty for chancing an assault on the orchard? The Shops Throughout industry there are hundreds of Goldonians Printers, Carpenters, Boot makers, gardeners, Motor body builders, and electricians who owe their present craft and jobs to the methodical instruction of the dedicated shop masters, who were also in many cases housemasters, combining two jobs in one. We owe an awful lot to the shop masters over the years. The Band and Gymnastic Squad Those of us who were either in the band or gymnastic squad could write volumes about the numerous engagements we had and the shows we put on for the public and Barnardo's. I was in the band under, first, Mr. Marchant, a grand old man with a jovial and understanding way, and later Mr. Young, a young ex-military type. We practised at all times and in the evenings we had the audience of the other lads listening to. us practising rousing marches like "Blaze Away", "Sussex by the Sea", or "Plaisir D'Amour" for a gymnastic and band engagement. Out of the many engagements we had, the most popular one was Barnardo's "Founder's Day" where we played with other Barnardo bands before The Duke and Duchess of York, Princess Margaret, and Princess Elizabeth (now our Queen). What a momentous day this was. The displays by gymnastic squads of Goldings, R. C. N. S., W. N. T. S., Kingston Bag Pipers, the displays by The Village Girls, and the shop exhibitions by Goldings, set out around The Village green. This was Barnardo's at its best, where they showed the public the results of their dedicated task, the fruitfulness of their works. The Albert and Central Halls were also favourite engagements and we loved the excitement of the journey through London, seeing the lights and people loitering around. We remember the late nights too; arriving back at Goldings around 2 o'clock in the morning from some engagement, with our uniform pockets filled with cakes and fruit for our pals. We always enjoyed long engagements which meant a long trip and a late night. I remember the first thing we asked on being told about a forthcoming engagement was "how far is it?". The gym squad and the band worked so well together and Mr. Patch, the energetic gym master, could always turn out a 100 per cent, show that gave great credit to Barnardo's. The Holiday Camp As we Old Boys know, the pre-Dymchurch camp craze was the making of walking canes. The carpenters and wheelwrights had their share of business and great pride was taken to design an attractive cane for use during the three weeks' holiday at Dymchurch. We had a wonderful time there and remember the keen football matches against the other schools camped there. Romance played quite a prominent part at Dymchurch and many a boy came away with some souvenir, a locket, or a lace handkerchief, and the promise that next year they would meet again to renew their romance. Each house took pride in the morning inspections by Mr. Patch and the housemasters; it was well turned out and would do credit to any regiment. The Church The band always led the School to morning and evening services, playing rousing marches and giving this occasion an air of dignity and grace. I never took the church seriously, although it was good and necessary for me, and in later years stood me in good stead. I can still remember the stained glass windows above the altar and the picture of the soldier and sailor looking upward; this always intrigued and fascinated me, and during the "Governor's" sermon I would often be looking at this window instead of listening to him. During my time I attended a funeral service which moved me a great deal and to, this day I can still remember the hymn we sang, it was "Jesu, Lover of my Soul", perhaps this is the reason why I have always preferred this hymn above most others. "Lights Out" I became the bugler in later years and played "Lights Out" and "Reveille" each night and morning. Now, if 1 were there, I would play the final "Lights Out" to the houses that were: Somerset, Aberdeen, Mount Stephen, Kinnaird, Buxton, Cairns, and McCall. But Goldings will always live on in the hearts and minds of all those who passed through it's walls and found hope and a future before them. I end with an appropriate motto from my old regiment: "Deep rooted in a glorious past its name continues to bring forth fresh leaves of fame." J. N. G.


Reply ID 87101

02/04/2012 by Dave

OUR NEW CHAPLAIN. A few weeks after the departure of Mr. Guilford saw the arrival of Mr. Corke, and although he has only been here a short time he is already deeply engrossed in his work. He quickly proved his sports manship by his willingness to enter into our games, and from what we have seen of him he is going to he of great benefit to all. We wish Mr. Corke every success in his new sphere, and we hope to get on well together. L. SCOTT. THE STAFF PANTOMIME. The Burlesque Pantomine which the staff gave us a short time ago was very successful, and must have been a gratifying result to them after the hard work they put in rehearsing it. Each part was acted superbly, and the antics of Messrs. Hemming and Jenkins, coupled with the efforts of the rest of the party, went to make up a really excellent programme. Again, the orchestra proved its worth, and, conducted by the able hand of Mr. Marchant, rendered some splendid music. We must not forget those that prepared the lighting, scenery, etc., and our thanks are due to Mr. C. Wollen for the aid he gave behind the scenes. We assure them that they gave us an enjoyable evening, and we are looking forward with expectancy to their next entertainment. L. SCOTT. OUR CINEMA SHOW. Thursday, the I4th of February, will go down in the history of Goldings, as the occasion when we had the first cinema show, entirely arranged and conducted by our Staff. From first to last it was a splendid performance, and we felt ourselves amply compensated for what few faults there were by the fine choice of films and the herculean task accomplished by the trio in the operating box. As a matter of fact, we seriously advise them to don shorts and singlets on another occasion, they will find them far more convenient. The orchestra also deserve a word of commendation for untiring energies through out the performance. This, however, is still another word in favour of Mr. Marchant, and the standard of efficiency that he maintains among his boys. Three very appropriate films were shown, and we only hope that future performances of this nature will be as successful as " Our first Cinema Show." L. SCOTT. Sergt. KETCH. The Goldonian 1927 (The School Magazine)


Reply ID 87366

19/04/2012 by Dave

A TREAT IN STORE. Before the edition of the " Mag." appears Goldingites will have marked another big step forward in the way of up-to-date entertainments ; in other words, we are having our own cinema. The machine and other necessary apparatus have been overhauled, so before long we hope to have some very enjoyable evenings. SNOW. By a strange coincidence the snow came exactly the same time this year as last and brought with it the usual fun and frolic. Future N.C.O.'s in 2027 will talk in hushed whispers of the memorable retreat by 1927 N.C.O.'s from wash-house to Rec. hut. A few of the staff will have good cause to remember also. However, 'snow use crying over spilt milk ; but I'm certain that the next fall of snow will get a mixed reception. Here is an account given by one of the " enemy " SNOW FUN. The first morning when I woke up and saw snow, I thought to myself, if it is deep I shall have a game of snow-balling in my spare time. As the N.C.O.'s went from the wash-house to " Rec." or opposite, I and other chaps gave them a good pelting of snowballs. There was going to be a snow-ball fight between bottom dorms. and top at 4 o'clock after shops, hut the snow was too brittle, it wouldn't hold together. There were plenty of " Rec." windows to mend after the snow had gone. There was plenty of slides and toboggans on one Saturday afternoon, which I liked both. It wasn't very good when the snow started thawing. Plenty of " Boots " to mend. J. C. GOSDEN. SHORTHAND CLASSES. The above classes have been running for a considerable time now, under the capable direction of Mr. Maslin, and have been attended by quite a large number of enthusiasts. Good progress is being made, and it is the ambition of all to be certificate holders before long. HOW WE SPEND THE WEDNESDAY HALF-HOLIDAY. I suppose Dormitory Footer must take pride of place, but if you don't happen to be playing, try rag rugger. Of course, with those few fortunate bike owners the problem has already solved itself. Go for a spin with Mr. de Boeck, hurtle through the balmy air, and, if you don't have a good time, its your own fault, certainly not Mr. de Boeck's. Badminton is a most alluring attraction, and will be better supported when we can persuade that select few to give others a chance. However, your half cannot possibly be dull, thanks to those members of the staff who make our pleasures their personal duty. OUR NEW CHAPLAIN. A few weeks after the departure of Mr. Guilford saw the arrival of Mr. Corke, and although he has only been here a short time he is already deeply engrossed in his work. He quickly proved his sports manship by his willingness to enter into our games, and from what we have seen of him he is going to be of great benefit to all. We wish Mr. Corke every success in his new sphere, and we hope to get on well together. L. SCOTT. THE STAFF PANTOMIME. The Burlesque Pantomime which the staff gave us a short time ago was very successful, and must have been a gratifying result to them after the hard work they put in rehearsing it. Each part was acted superbly, and the antics of Messrs. Hemming and Jenkins, coupled with the efforts of the rest of the party, went to make up a really excellent programme. Again, the orchestra proved its worth, and, conducted by the able hand of Mr. Marchant, rendered some splendid music. We must not forget those that prepared the lighting, scenery, etc., and our thanks are due to Mr. C. Wollen for the aid he gave behind the scenes. We assure them that they gave us an enjoyable evening, and we arc looking forward with expectancy to their next entertainment. L. SCOTT. OUR CINEMA SHOW. Thursday, the 14th of February, will go down in the history of Goldings, as the occasion when we had the first cinema show, entirely arranged and conducted by our Staff. From first to last it was a splendid performance, and we felt ourselves amply compensated for what few faults there were by the fine choice of films and the herculean task accomplished by the trio in the operating box. As a matter of fact, we seriously advise them to don shorts and singlets on another occasion, they will find them far more convenient. The orchestra also deserve a word of commendation for untiring energies through out the performance. This, however, is still another word in favour of Mr. Marchant, and the standard of efficiency that he maintains among his boys. Three very appropriate films were shown, and we only hope that future performances of this nature will be as successful as " Our first Cinema Show," L. SCOTT. Sergt. KETCH. The Goldonian February 1927 (School Magazine)


Reply ID 87654

01/05/2012 by Dave

LETTER FROM AUSTRALIA P.O. Box 56 Dalby, Q'ld Australia The Editor, The Goldonian Dear Sir and all at Goldings. May I first thank you for the magazine which is always a great joy to receive. This time, alas, it was not such a joy as it brought the news of Jim Maslin's passing. Yes, Jim Maslin, the idol of all the at Stepney. I remember him well, Mr. Marchant's son-in-law. I see him now doing sentry duty as we boys used to call it. There was a small sentry box at Stepney where he used to take his turn checking the boys out and in on Wednesday nights and Saturday afternoons. Yes, he was quite a guy. We never had to worry if we were a few minutes late getting in. No need to sneak past, a cheery wave and so to bed. What was there about this man that I (and I have no doubt so many others) should remember him so well after all these years? (I am over sixty.) All I can say is that Jim Maslin was placed by birth and character above the petty need of standing on his dignity. I would love to have his photo and I am sending the money for same under separate cover by surface mail. I have no doubt with the passing of time many changes have" taken place at Goldings and it may well be that old faces could he forgotten. I used to play in the band under the baton of Mr. Marchant and like Jim I was present at the exodus from Stepney to Goldings. I emigrated to Australia from Goldings and have had a very varied and interesting life out here I settled down in Dalby some thirty years ago and for the last twenty years I have been employed as a shop assistant in the local pharmacy. My wife-and I have reared a family of ten, four of whom are still at home and going to school. The others are married but they live quite near and are all doing well. After I first came out here I moved about quite a bit as it was hard to get a job in the depression, as a result I have seen quite a bit of the country. I have lately established contact with my family in Canada. I understand I was only three or four months old when I was admitted to the homes in Stepney. I was boarded out until I was ten and then went to Woodford. Then on to Stepney where I joined the band and so to Goldings. I have no doubt, Mr. Powell, you may recall the old song 'Playthings' which was a great favourite in the old days. It ran something like this: 'Right from the cradle and sweet baby joys, life plays with us like a child with its toys,'. I think you will agree that this is quite true. Well sir and friends I have bored you quite enough. May I again thank you all and wish you all the best. May God have you all in his holy keeping. Please convey my deepest sympathy to Mrs. Maslin and her family. Perhaps the knowledge that someone so far away has always had a soft spot for Jim and remembered him may be of some help. God Bless. Very sincerely yours, D. MASSEY Goldonian July 1966.


Reply ID 87930

19/05/2012 by Dave

THE BARNARDO FETE AT THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL "THE Fete opened at 2.30 p.m., when Her Grace the Countess of Athlone, ascended the dais, after proceeding through a guard of honour composed of Watts boys. After the National Anthem and prayers, etc., the show started in earnest. The Russell-Cotes boys, looking very natty in their white shorts and singlets, and red socks, were the first performers. They put up a display of chair tricks and ground tableaux, which were well received. Kingston boys performed a sketch entitled "Settlers in Canada." The settlers, a band of men and their families, occupied one half of the arena. The other half was screened from, their view by human "trees"; on the other side were a band of "Indians." Whilst the men were away from the settlement, the "Indians" swooped down and captured the "women and children." The men returned and recaptured their "families," and finally smoked the pipe of peace. The costumes were extremely picturesque, also the wigwams and the settlers' wagon. The performers executed their parts extremely well. The presentation, of purses and banners, etc., was heralded by the Kingston Pipers in their kilts and tartans. The Watts Naval School performed a version of "Humpty Dumpty," cleverly combining the hornpipe, cutlass drill, and figure marching, and concluding with an act by the comic cook. The King's Horses (hobby) and men executed the figure marching, pirates the cutlass drill, and sailors, in white ducks, the hornpipe. The G.V.H. gave the audience an idea of what their life is like in the Village. This was very well done, and must have taken months to prepare. In addition, after dark the fairies appeared, but were dispersed by "wicked" elves, who introduced mortals into the "fairy ring." One little "mortal," dragging a teddy bear, almost as large as himself along behind, evoked much applause. The "Tiny Tots," always a favourite item with the public, sang and danced and acted extraordinarily well, and I am sure the teachers, who put in so much patient training with them, were justly rewarded by the applause received. The next item was our own Gym Display, and I think I, with the complete impartiality of a humble spectator, can say that it excelled anything previously performed by any Barnardo Home in the Albert Hall. It went through perfectly with no flaws whatsoever. To safeguard the standard of gymnastics reached by the team, they all had their hearts tested. To quote the words of another gym. instructor: "A men's team could do no better." The B.G.C. gave a display of mass marching, which was made very effective by the graduation of coloured jerseys worn by the boys. An interesting anecdote from the moving films was the commencement of our own School, and showed the boys leaving Stepney, then marching from Hertford North into the gates, on to what is now the lawn. Mr. Marchant was Bandmaster even in those days, as this film showed. As usual, the Choir sang beautifully, both between items in the arena, and for the tiny tots and the G.V.H. fantasy. The Watts Naval Band was also in attendance. B. H. C. The Goldonian January 1936


Reply ID 88253

07/06/2012 by Dave

From: Leslie Vivash (Goldings). "What a most memorable occasion at St. Paul's Cathedral; I thought it to be one of the most moving scenes it has been my joy to witness for a long while. I sat there watching for Old Boys I knew at Goldings and was fortunate in meeting just two or three. No one will know the thrill I had sitting amongst so many Old Boys and Girls. "I enjoyed every moment of my stay in Barnardo's; my earliest recollections are of walking through Stepney Causeway as a tiny boy, carrying and dragging the big blue and white striped bag with all my precious belongings and going to my first foster parents. At 14 I went to Goldings to learn a trade and I well remember arriving there at tea time feeling very hungry and the Master asked us if there was anything we wanted—up shot my hand saying 'Can I have some more to eat?' and from all directions particles of food were given me by the boys and readily I got the nickname 'Oliver Twist'! I soon settled down and joined in all the games, etc., became a member of the Band, joined the Matron's leatherwork class, and was given a choice of trades of which T chose carpentry. I became so interested 1 used to stay behind in the workshop when others had finished. I was so terribly sad to leave there. Old Boys who used to visit the school used to tell us of the 'great big world' outside, but my world was at Goldings—a wonderful place. Everyone from the Governor down to the office cleaner was sheer kindness itself. I was that happy I wanted to be in everything. I left in 1930 and believe me the going was hard. I worked hard, sometimes 120 hours a week to keep a job, but kept it I did for the sake of the kindness shown me in the Homes. The care and attention of your staff has got me where I am now. I worked up from being a carpenter and joiner to Foreman carpenter, then General Foreman to Manager in the firm I am now and where I have been 26 years this year. In fact in recent years I have had the joy of estimating and carrying out works building of various sizes for the Homes at Stepney and Woodford. "Thank you all once again a million times for getting me where I am now." January 1967


Reply ID 88505

22/06/2012 by Dave

GOLDINGS v. TV TRAVELLERS WHAT IT is hoped may become an annual social event at Goldings took place on Saturday, I5th June, when a team of TV personalities, the TV Travellers, journeyed to Goldings to challenge staff and boys to a one-day cricket match. Advance publicity drew quite a number of cricket enthusiasts and, I imagine, a greater number of autograph hunters. Both sections must have felt well rewarded, for autographs were willingly distributed and the cricket was never dull. Such is the beautiful setting surrounding the bottom field, affording spectators an amphitheatre seating, cricket matches take on a gladiatorial atmosphere, although the Romans would have frowned upon their 'emperor' taking refreshments to the contestants. The School batted first, and with 5 wickets down for 65, a high score seemed improbable. However, good scores by the Headmaster and Gordon Ansty added to the 40 by Dr. Jory and Mr. Tordoff’s 19, took the final score to 139. Wilbert Workman was the not out batsman and so he batted for the TV Travellers, as they were one man short. Messrs. James and Ansty opened the bowling for the School and captured an early wicket apiece, the scoreboard reading at that time 5 for 2. Then Christopher Trace, who we had been informed when reading the programme, had five thumbs on each hand, demonstrate a how useful all these thumbs were by scoring 21 and, backed ably by I. Salter, stopped the rot. However, when these two went, the remainder of the side could offer only token resistance. Workman added a valuable contribution of 16 and will probably be offered a producer's job, provided he plays regularly for the Travellers. It appeared that all the ladies were under the spell of Michael Aspel and he delighted them all with a great variety of strokes, three of which caused his bat to connect with the ball. Everyone agreed this venture was a great success, even all those 'off stage' personalities for whom the venture made so much work. ARTEBEES Summer 1963


Reply ID 88748

01/07/2012 by Dave

WIMBLEDON—1964 THIS YEAR, as far as ladies were concerned, was a time to show off their frills and laces as many did. It was also the year the Australians swept the board in every event except the Women's Singles. Maggie Smith was the favourite and No.1 seed. She was to meet Maria Bueno the No. 2 seed but the brilliant Brazilian beat Maggie Smith, who was also beaten by her nerves, 6-4, 6-8, 6-2. Reporters described it as the best final played on Centre Court for years, and it was a rewarding tribute to Maria, who mastered all the touch line strokes and artistry to humble her opponent. For Maria it was the third time she had won the ladies' title. In the Men's Singles Roy Emerson, the No.i seed, beat his fellow countryman Fred Stolle in an exciting and enthralling match which was unfortunately interrupted by rain after the first set. Maggie Smith made another appearance in a final partnering Leslie Turner in the Ladies' Doubles. They met and beat the American challenge of Billie Jean Moffit and Karen Susman. Last year Maggie and Ruth Ebbern won the Ladies' Doubles for Australia. Energetic Maggie appeared in yet another final, the Mixed Doubles, in which she and Ken Fletcher were the holders. They were paired together again and held on to their title by beating fellow Australians Fred Stolle and Leslie Turner in a match which both women excelled to make it difficult for the men o shine through stamina. Finally, to make their mark at Wimbledon, Australians Ken Fletcher and Roy Emerson played and beat Bob Hewitt and Fred Stolle. The lucky people on Centre Court were able to witness some superb tennis. So far as tennis is concerned the Aussies got in every final, but the lucky and reputed efficient ball-boys from Goldings were in every match! DEREK HAMMOND Goldonian 1964 The following letter was received during the last week of the competition : BOURNEMOUTH 1st July, 1964 Dear Head Ball-boy, I don't know how many letters you receive, but will you please thank all the boys for doing a wonderful job during the Championships. You are my pin-up boys just as much as the stars. Thank you very much. Yours sincerely TENNIS LOVER


Reply ID 89375

05/08/2012 by Dave

GOLDINGS NOTES In marked contrast to last year, the boys who went to St. Mary's Bay Holiday Camp enjoyed three weeks of bright sunshine. We welcome Mr. F. A. Williams, our newly appointed Executive Officer, who has entered whole heartedly into all the activities of the School.. He and Mrs. Williams organised a Prefects' Concert Party, and their Blueshirts' Revue was a great success. . The Cadets have been kept very busy with training, camping and inter-company sports. Thirty nine Cadets now possess Cert. A. Part 1, and nine Part 2. We congratulate Mr. Culver on his well merited promotion to the rank of Captain. C.S.M. Vallance won the 880 yds. race in the Inter-Battalion Athletics and came second in the National Championship Sports. Under the able supervision of Mr. Embleton, our brass band is making good progress. It has now some public performances to its credit, including the playing of the Regimental March Past at the annual inspection of the Cadets. The efficiency and courteous behaviour of the 50 ball-boys at the Wimbledon Tennis Championship Meeting brought the following comment from Sir Louis Greig, the President of the All England Lawn Tennis Club: — "It seemed to me this year that they never made a mistake and we have had nothing but praise for the way in which they worked, from all competitors." Somerset House won the Inter-House Athletic Competition and McCall House the Swimming Competition. It is with great regret that we record the death of Mr. Percy Mills, a faithful servant of the School for many years. We shall miss this genial and kindly personality. We are glad to welcome Mr. Disney on his return to School after a long illness. G. F. Goldings Notes 1947


Reply ID 89611

27/08/2012 by Dave

ROYAL TOURNAMENT—1963 Although the Corps of Drums were unable to accept the invitation to give a display at the Royal Tournament on Friday, 21st June, I was able to send fifty cadets under the command of Sgt. J. Clarke, S.I., on Wednesday, 12th June, to watch this great spectacle. The following notes were made by Mr. Clarke as I was on holiday at the time. On arrival at the Royal Tournament we were met by one of our old boys, Paul Smith, who was in fact taking part in the show. As usual the whole affair was a great success, with the gymnastic display and the Royal Marine Band being top favourites, although the old faithfuls, the Chelsea Pensioners, came near .to stealing the show. Several of the lads voiced their disappointment at not being able to take part, but I am sure they all felt they were very lucky to have the opportunity to watch such a display, and our thanks are due once again to our Headmaster for allowing us to go. BEDFORDSHIRE AND HERTFORDSHIRE T.A. REGIMENT DISPLAY On 2nd September, the Territorial Army held a recruiting drive at the Drill Hall, Ware. Our Company was invited to send fifty boys and it was no trouble to find volunteers for this task. The layout was excellent with all the modern equipment on show as well as the Regiment's new colours and drums. ' Once again'we were honoured by the fact that two of our N.C.O.s were selected to act as Regimental Police at the show. Sgt. J. Bassett and Cpl. T. Bowden performed their duties admirably, and we "thank Major Vigus for giving them the opportunity. Finally a very special mention must be made of the Band and Drums for their wonderful performance, it was certainly a great inspiration to our 'little brothers'. A. P. CULVER, Captain O.LC. OLD BOY FEATURED IN 'SUNDAY MIRROR' ON SUNDAY, 8th November, the Sunday Mirror devoted its centre spread to two victims of war, one from World War I and the other from World War II. The younger of the two veterans was Frederick Charles Vincent, who was trained in our Printing Department from April, 1940, until June, 1941, when he left to take up a position with Messrs. Creaseys of Hertford. In 1943 he joined the army, and one year later was in the wrong spot when a shell exploded, from which he suffered severe head and leg wounds. Four years later he developed tuberculosis in his left leg, and as a result Private Vincent will never leave his wheelchair again. Despite his handicap, the picture shows a cheerful, vigorous-looking man, and as no doubt the Sunday Mirror intended, an inspiration to those of us who were not in the wrong spot. With such fortitude by men like Freddie, let us not forget their sacrifice, and the greatest service we can offer is friendship, by writing to or visiting these restricted friends. Should you have known Freddie please drop him a line, or if the distance is not too great, call and see him, Address: Star and Garter Home, Richmond, Surrey. N. T. P. The Goldonian 1963


Reply ID 89902

08/09/2012 by Dave

ART CLUB VISIT TO AN ART STUDIO ON FRIDAY, 8th February, the Art Club made a visit to the studio of a local artist, Mr. D. Chittock, the cartoonist and portrait painter. He welcomed a group of eleven boys accompanied by Mr. Sheppard who runs the Art Club on Friday evenings. As we went through his hallway we were all very interested in the many fine portrait paintings which were on display there. Mr. Chittock then took us to his studio where he works and the first thing to catch our eyes was the cartoon nearing completion and which was for the next issue of the Daily Herald newspaper. Mr. Chittock is helped with this cartoon by a friend who writes the script and they both work under the name of 'Lucian'. The cartoon is first drawn in pencil, then painted in later with black ink using a fine brush. The size of the original cartoon is about three times the size of the one actually seen in the newspaper. He showed us his equipment, and we all discussed it with him. He answered a lot of the boys questions, such as what type of brushes he uses and how many portraits he paints in a year. After a very enjoyable evening, we said goodnight and returned home. E. M GOLDNGS v. TV TRAVELLERS WHAT IT is hoped may become an annual social event at Goldings took place on Saturday, 15th June, when a team of TV personalities, the TV Travellers, journeyed to Goldings to challenge staff and boys to a one-day cricket match. Advance publicity drew quite a number of cricket enthusiasts and, I imagine, a greater number of autograph hunters. Both sections must have felt well rewarded, for autographs were willingly distributed and the cricket was never dull. Such is the beautiful setting surrounding the bottom field, affording spectators an amphitheatre seating, cricket matches take on a gladiatorial atmosphere, although the Romans would have frowned upon their 'emperor' taking refreshments to the contestants. The School batted first, and with 5 wickets down for 65, a high score seemed improbable. However, good scores by the Headmaster and Gordon Ansty added to the 40 by Dr. Jory and Mr. Tordoff's 19, took the final score to 139. Wilbert Workman was the not out batsman and so he batted for the TV Travellers, as they were one man short. Messrs. James and Ansty opened the bowling for the School and captured an early wicket apiece, the Scoreboard reading at that time 5 for 2. Then Christopher Trace, who we had been informed when reading the programme, had five thumbs on each hand, demonstrated how useful all these thumbs were by scoring 21 and, backed ably by I. Salter, stopped the rot. However, when these two went, the remainder of the side could offer only token resistance. Workman added a valuable contribution of 16 and will probably be offered a producer's job, provided he plays regularly for the Travellers. It appeared that all the ladies were under the spell of Michael Aspel and he delighted them all with a great variety of strokes, three of which caused his bat to connect with the ball. Everyone agreed this venture was a great success, even all those 'off-stage' personalities for whom the venture made so much work. F.Tordoff, lbw, b Jackson.....19 C.Steele, lbw, b Salter.......8 H.Jory, run out...............40 J.Mason, b Jackson............5 L.Embleton, b Jackson.........1 J.James, c Morris.............17 R.F.Wheatley, b Jackson.......24 G.Ansty, c Sub, b Salter......16 W.Hoy, lbw, b Jackson.........3 K.R.Wood, lbw b Jackson.......0 W.Workman, not out............0 Extras........................6 T.V. TRAVELLERS E.Parker, b Ansty.............2 C.Trace, c Hoy , Wheatley.....21 J.A.Morris, b James...........2 I.Salter, c Steele, b James...17 D.Jackson, b James............2 S.Walsh, b James..............0 M.ASPEL, B Embleton...........3 T.Sargent, b Mason............5 R.Baron, c Ansty b Steele.....8 E.Ballard, not out............9 W.Workman, c Jackson b Embleton16 Extras........................11 _ 96 The Goldonian Summer 1963


Reply ID 89990

17/09/2012 by Dave

LETTER OF APPRECIATION THE HEADMASTER received the following letter of appreciation from Mr. Bassett, father of Tony and John, who both set such a fine example of how to make the best of the facilities available to boys who come to this School. Dear Sir, I am writing to you to express my thanks to you, and all of your staff for the education my two boys received while being at your school, and amongst other things the kindness, care and thought which everyone of you have showed towards them. I shall always be grateful to you, also my thoughts will always be with you. May God bless you and help you to carry on the good work so that other children may benefit from your school. Once again my thanks from the bottom of my heart. Yours very truly, (signed) J. Bassett The Goldonian Summer 1964


Reply ID 90510

15/10/2012 by Dave

Many readers may not be aware,amongst our trades was Printing,which was considered the more senior trade at Goldings as a degree of superior learning was required to allow you to join,example,English and Spelling set the criterea to join.In 1950 a large house was aquired which would allow the Printers to complete their apprentiship at Goldings as this was now set at 21,so junior printers would complete part of their learning up to 16 then move down the "Verney", renamed from "Waterford Hall" in Waterford Village. This also allowed this age group to mature into more independent you men and to experience what they were likley to encounter in the "real world" after the support given to them at Goldings.The house after Goldings closed took on various roles,but I now beleive it is privatley owned and a major re furb has been carried out by it's new owner,but at one time it housed fourteen boys between the ages of 16-21,so below is a reflection by a printer of a day in the live of his "Verney" days. A DAY AT THE VERNEY 'RISE AND SHINE'. Every morning this is the way we're greeted as Mr. Newton does his rounds at 7.15 a.m. A couple of boys hurry to get up and get to the sink for their morning 'sprinkle'. Others try to have a couple of minutes longer in bed, but aren't usually successful as Mr. Newton knows it all. The 'early boy' and the 'toaster' go down stairs to the warm paradise of the kitchen to get our breakfast laid up. Mrs. Kemp then asks the 'early boy' to 'ring Mr. Newton and bash the gong'. We crawl down the stairs and settle down in our seats for breakfast. 'Can we say grace?' Mr. Newton says 'For what we . . . ' 'Amen', and breakfast has begun. After breakfast, into the common room to 'light-up' and sit down until 8.30 when we go to work. 'Half-past; coming up?' and everyone enthusiastically (?) rushes off to work. Passing the Waterford bus stop a few 'good mornings' with a few put on smiles are exchanged. Three boys pass on their bikes and shout such things as 'woop' and "ning'. Up Goldings Lane and down the drive into the Printing Department. I'm 'in, Mr. Stevenson' utter a few people so as to be marked on the time sheet. Then we all settle down to work until our 10.30 a.m. break when once again it's 'light-up' time. 'Fags' finished, it's back to work until 12.15 p.m. when we trundle up to the School for dinner. Usually we sit for 15 minutes in the wind-tunnel type corridor until cookhouse is blown. After dinner it's time for our game of football. No one is willing to take the responsibility of picking a team and the usual remarks of 'I picked up yesterday (or three weeks ago) so it's someone else's turn'. But eventually the teams are picked and we're off. 'Goal' someone shouts, 'never, it hit the post' (usually a pile of jackets) so there is a dispute over that. 1.25 p.m. so it's back to work, where half an hour is usually spent 'cooling off'. At 3 p.m. back down for a smoke, and then work again until 5 o'clock. Tea is usually at 5.30 p.m. and then after tea we retire to the common room and wonder what to do with ourselves until 'lights-out' at 11 p.m. Some go up to the Club, others (the luckier ones) go to the pictures, while the rest either watch TV or listen to records. Two nights a week we go dancing so there's no trouble there. 'Who's going to help get the supper up?' someone asks. No reply so he does it himself. 'Suppers ready' and everyone jumps up for dining room. 'Arter you with the grog', 'Pass the marg', come the requests. Then back to the common room, until 10.45 p-m 'Right-ho lads', Mr. Newton says, and everybody drags themselves up to bed. 'Good night all', and another day at The Verney comes to an end. But nevertheless, it's a grand life (if you don't worry). W. CHARLTON Footnote..This article was written by Bill Charlton in Spring 1962,who died the same time and day as Princess Diana!


Reply ID 91146

20/11/2012 by Dave

A Backward Glance SCIENCE HAS made many fine advances in the field of physical and mental health but there is one 'disease' for which she has no answer reminiscence! That dreadful ailment which causes man to be continually looking back at his past. For example, when two G. O. B.s (Goldings Old Boys)meet after a long interval their subject of conversation will invariably revolve around the old school days and many an hour can be spent in this way. When the present writer visited some old school friends recently and then spent a day at Goldings it was inevitable that his mind should revolve around his days within its grounds. It was January, 1948, when about 16 new boys arrived at the School, among them a rather shy lad from New Lodge, Windsor. To say the least my first impressions of Goldings were rather frightening. Everything seemed so much bigger, and rougher, than I had been used to. The building was so much bigger, the dining hall was so much bigger, the dormitories were so much bigger, and the senior lads seemed to tower over one. I can still hear the voice of (so it seemed to me) a huge coloured prefect, McKinney, bellowing orders across the dining hall during my first meal. What memories crowd into one's mind of those early years. Mr. Williams was then Executive Officer and was responsible for discipline. Naturally a bad tempered lad had many brushes with this austere representative of law and order, and many a Saturday afternoon was spent in scrubbing floors (e. g. the passage from the hall to the kitchen) on one's knees, as a punishment. Heart breaking work on a summer's day! What conditions in those days! The washing facilities consisted largely of long troughs along which we all lined up. The baths were primitive showers which varied in usefulness and one had to fight to obtain a good spray. With about 20-30 boys under the showers at the same time many missiles (soap) flew in the direction of bare bodies. Nor could one be sure of the right temperature of the water. with Mr. Moon at the controls there would be cries of 'Hot', but the hot was invariably too hot and the cold was invariably too cold. I desist from an attempt to describe the lavatories. What a difference today! But the era was not without its consolations. Good behaviour brought rewards! I don't know whether this might be termed a form of bribery? The finest of these rewards was a slap-up feed for the best house. A system of points awarded against one, and consequently against one's house, showed which house had the best behaviour for the month. Of course this meant that a lad making points against his house would become very unpopular. The feast itself was often observed by members of other houses who pressed their grimy noses against the dining hall windows whilst the feast was in progress. Shades of Oliver Twist! The mention of food reminds me of another event worth mentioning. Food was not as plenteous as nearly 200 hungry lads would have liked. Such a situation provided a good 'black market' for some of the less scrupulous of the senior lads who were responsible for serving out the food. The prices, as I recall them, were 2d. spot cash or 3d. on Friday for a 'ginner and marg'. Prices for other commodities escape me. Hungry boys paid up and I have known racketeers to make as much as 15/- to £i in a week. In fairness I ought to add that this eventually came to the attention of the representatives of the law and the practice was stopped. My own progress in the School was not without difficulties. There were many trials in those early years and one attempt to run away which ended the same day that it began with four (or was it six?) strokes of the cane administered on various parts of the anatomy. The Headmaster will recall on another occasion a rather tear-stained lad asking when he could leave the School. But these were but 'growing pains' and there are many happy memories. How can I soon forget the friendship of my housemaster, Jack Johnston? Or the patience of Mr. Millar and the printing staff? Or the encouragements of Mr. Moss and Mr. Fogg, and later Mr. Blackmore, of the school teaching staff? The mention of these latter gentlemen reminds me of my greatest interest in the school the stage. When I arrived at Goldings I soon joined the Drama group. It was the ambitious plan of Mr. Fogg to stage Bernard Shaw's Androcles and the Lion, in which I was to play the leading female part, Lavinia. Fortunately for me this plan never materialized. During those six years I have many memories of plays, sketches and even a pantomime which we staged, John Langdon ever taking the leading comedy spot. His 'Widow Twankey' in Aladdin, and the Sergeant in Reluctant Heroes stand out in my mind. And so one could continue to reminisce but time does not permit. I ought to add, however, that I have also many memories connected with the printing shop which have found no mention in the course of this article. 18th March, 1955 over seven years after entering Goldings and now it was my last day. Perhaps the words of Michael Smith sum it up. As I smilingly said farewell to him he dryly asked, 'What, no tears?' No tears indeed, but undoubtedly many memories which will remain with me for many years. B. C. 1960


Reply ID 91150

20/11/2012 by Dave

LITERARY SECTION Christmas Pantomime THE SCHOOL'S Christmas concert which took the form of a pantomime under the title 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' proved an excellent evening's entertainment, and was from the first curtain a great success. Written and produced under the capable hands of Mr. Newton, he made it more interesting by giving it a distinct Golding’s flavour. The show was introduced by Mr. Newton as the Good Fairy (vital statistics 40-40-40) which as the evening progressed was no indication that he was a straight actor, and there followed the introduction of the cast in an attractive woodland setting, designed and painted by Mr. Sheppard the stage manager, each actress and actor presenting themselves to the audience in rhyme. From then on the fun started, and the very laughable antics of the voluptuous Dame, played with vigour and fun by an experienced Mr. Powell, and the charm of Snow White, played most effectively by Josephine Sheppard, had little effect on the hilarious behaviour of the Seven Dwarfs who, under their disguise—which was cleverly applied by Mrs. Stackwood, capably assisted by Mrs. Powell—were none other than M. Justice, C. Bishop, B. Hyland, S. Denton, M. Cashmore, D. Holmes, and D. Pike, and their task was only made easier by the timely interruptions of the Villains played with great gusto and terror by Mr. Stackwood, who seemed the only one capable of controlling these irrepressible and mischievious gentlemen. The first main scene showing the dwarfs in school brought a complete surprise, when the good fairy giving a dancing lesson to the class called for her 'Corps de Ballet' to give a demonstration, and on to the stage tripped five of the staff wives, Mesdames D. Millar, E. Newton, D. Maslin, R. Sheppard, and D. Tordoff, in authentic costume of the 1940's to give a vigorous and spirited display of the Charleston. Never have wiggles, jumps and stomps earned such well-deserved applause. At the end of this scene Prince Charming in the shapely form of Christine Stackwood made his appearance together with his two handsome pages, and was introduced to Snow White, with whom he promptly fell in love. As the show progressed the villain tried hard to outwit the Prince for the hand of Snow White, but the dwarfs using all their natural talent frequently interrupted to thwart the course of true love, and so allying themselves with Snow White's page. Many sections of the show call for description, but perhaps if we remember such scenes as the dwarfs being put to bed by the Dame and Snow White; the Dame and Villain tying themselves up with a deck chair at the seaside; the custard pie delivered in Dame's face by an over enthusiastic dwarf in the breakfast scene; the parson played with such reverence by Mr. Jones who did eventually marry the right couples, much to the disgust of the Villain who finished up wed to the Dame. The fine solo and choral singing, which was aided by the efforts of the chapel choir throughout the show and was the result of much hard work by Mr. Mondin, the pianist, and Mr. Goodger, the choirmaster, this panto will be one of those shows never to be forgotten. On the afternoon of Tuesday the following day the show was put on as a special performance for the Old People of Hertford, who were brought to the gymnasium by coach and sat throughout the afternoon with happy tears of laughter streaming down their faces. At the end of the show their representatives thanked the cast and all those responsible for giving them such a wonderful afternoon, and with this they included the tea, which was served to them during the interval. Finally a word of thanks should again be extended to all those who did the hard work behind the scenes, few of the departments escaped being called upon for something. The local Scout troop were most helpful in lending a number of costumes and much time was spent by the sewing ladies in repairing, altering and even making more costumes, the 'carps' were called upon to give their skill in making props, the school art club gave valuable assistance in helping to paint the props and scenery, the electricians who had many demands made on them for lighting effects, and many others who willingly gave time and effort to help. As for the audience, surely the rafters of the gymnasium have never rung so loudly as they did to the lusty singing of those who joined in the chorus of the Goldings song. Since the cast of the stage show seldom have the chance to see themselves 'as others see us' ours was more fortunate than most, for a few weeks after the show Mr. Wheatley kindly invited them together with all others who had taken any part in it, to see the colour transparencies which he had taken of the pantomime. Needless to say these were extremely good, and many were the hoots of laughter, which rang out as one member of the cast after another was shown in a comical posture. F. S. S.


Reply ID 91515

09/12/2012 by Dave

From Me to You To EVERYONE belonging to Goldings, boys and staff, past and present, I send my good wishes at this season of the year. Through THE GOLDONIAN I would like to send a special message to certain people I do not see so often as I would like to. For example to all those boys who never (well hardly ever) line the corridor outside my study in the mornings I send a special word of thanks. I have in. mind, too, all those boys who meet with difficulties, but face up to them and overcome them without much help from me, likewise those who steadily work away at their schooling and trade training to prepare themselves for a successful career and a life of usefulness to the community. You don't take up a lot of my time, but I am well aware of your presence in the school and the service you give in keeping up standards and giving us a good reputation wherever you go. I would also like to take the opportunity of expressing my deep appreciation of the support of every member of the Goldings staff, who in his or her particular field gets down to the job without repining for that never-never land where working conditions are ideal, rewards are equitable and administration is faultless. As Christmas approaches my sitting room gets more and more colourful as the very great number of greetings cards from Goldings boys and Old Boys are displayed around it. Even if we knew the addresses of all the kind people who send them, my wife and I could not possibly afford to return the compliment. We only hope that all of you will get a copy of this GOLDONIAN and read this short message, for we would like you to know what joy these greetings bring to us. When we lovingly arrange our collection we are touched by your thought for us, uplifted and refreshed in mind and spirit to persevere. p.s. Having had the privilege of reading the proofs of this issue, I would like to congratulate the writers of the House Notes, which are such a great improvement on those in recent issues. R. F. W. Headmasters Notes Winter 1960


Reply ID 92214

15/01/2013 by Dave

Grand Fete The Goldings Old Boys' Association are holding a Summer Fete in the lovely grounds of Port Vale House, Hertford, on Saturday, 25th July, 1959, beginning at 3 p.m. This, I think, is one of the biggest ventures the Old Boys have undertaken, and they need all the support they can get. Any offers of help, gifts of produce, articles for a "White Elephant" stall, etc, will be gratefully received. Arthur Robertson of the Printing Department is organising this function, so please contact him if you can help at all. In addition to the usual stalls and sideshows the School Gymnastics Team and the Corps of Drums will give a display. Book the date—SATURDAY, 25th July, 1959 Spring 1959


Reply ID 92215

15/01/2013 by Dave

EDITORIAL UNEMPLOYMENT is a word that is being used more these days than for the last twenty-five years and the stark fact that unemployment is a thing of reality and not just a 'wolf story is slowly dawning on the under-30's population, who until now have never really had to seek work. Full employment is an ideal situation, provided we all realize that to be employed one does not just have to be present, but is also expected to do a reasonable day's work. Perhaps the different definitions of the word 'reasonable' has some bearing on the situation today? Far be it for me to try and put my finger on the reason, or to suggest a solution to this unfortunate and gigantic problem which faces the nation today, but I do suggest that we could all do worse than make an extra effort at improving our efficiency. The boys here at Goldings have everything in their favour as regards training and conditions. No worry as to where the next meal will come from, or where they will sleep at night, or if there will be work for them tomorrow, and if a boy is apprenticed in the Printing Department, he is assured of a job until he is twenty-one, and boys who are in the other apprenticeable trades have practically as good a guarantee. It is very difficult to get the message through about the conditions of outside employment when all our boys have to do is report to shop each day. I suppose the only way to learn the hard facts of life is by experience. Unfortunately experience can be very costly, so to all boys at School now I say 'make the most of your opportunities, and listen and accept what your teachers, sbopmasters, and house parents tell you, they are not fools, and have had far greater experience in the world than you have'. I am quite sure there are many Old Boys who would be only too pleased to have their time over again at Goldings under the present conditions and who would work and listen a lot more now than they did when they were here. Another fact is that an hour lost can never be regained. Remember, there are eight hundred thousand unemployed now, and we send about sixty boys each year into the ranks of the employed (no boy leaves here without a job) but whether or not he stays employed depends to a large degree on his own efficiency, and his willingness to work and live with other people. Spring 1963 Foot Note "What has changed"


Reply ID 92216

15/01/2013 by Dave

MY TRADE When I first came here it was explained to me that there were five trades, one of which I could choose to learn; Printing, Gardening, Carpentry, Bootmaking and Sheet Metal Work. I soon made up my mind to choose Bootmaking. On the Thursday after I arrived I was asked to report to the office where I said that I wished to train in the Bootmaking department. I was shown the Bootmaking shop but it was all very new and strange to me on that first day. As Juniors we have only one day each week in shop and that first day went all too quickly. At the end of the day I was looking forward to the following Thursday. Our day is divided between theory and practice. My first practical job was repairing a heel, but when I have had more practice I hope I shall be capable of a complete repair, which will satisfy my teachers. In theory so far I have learned something of the processes which are needed to change skins into shoe leather but I have much to learn. I like my trade and enjoy working at it and although I have only been in the Bootmaking Department four months I feel sure I shall always enjoy working at this trade. A. BLACKBURN Summer 1954 Footnote "This was written by Alan Blackburn who was to sign at Goldings a Professional Football Contract with West Ham United. He now lives in Shropshire and unfortunately suffers from dementia".


Reply ID 92341

24/01/2013 by Dave

I wonder if anyone who looks in on this part of the site could help us out,every year we hold our re-union in Hertford at Sele Farm Community Centre and we all try to stay together in the same hotel (about 10-12 rooms between us)Usually we stay at the White Horse in Hertfordinbury but this year it's booked for a Wedding on the 5th of October (saturday)as we had a special rate of £50-00 per double room including breakfast.Most of us arrive on the Friday 4th,and leave on the Sunday (6th)so I just wondered if anyone looking in can help with any idea's on a similar package,but local, as the oldest Old Boy is 88 and his mobility is not that good.We also have Old Boys coming over from Australia and Canada,I would as the organiser appreciate any suggestions. P.S.I have contacted the Salisbury and Hertford House...to expensive! many thanks Dave.


Reply ID 92542

06/02/2013 by Dave

MY IMPRESSIONS OF THE CORONATION PROCESSION I was surprised and pleased to be told a week before the Coronation of the Queen that I had been selected to be one of a party to go to London to see the Coronation procession. On Monday evening, 1st June, I reported to the A.C.F. H.Q. at London Road Barracks, where I stayed the night. We were roused at 3 a.m. and after cleaning-up and having breakfast we left by the Cadet coach and arrived in London at 6 a.m. Already the streets were filling with people and we were escorted on foot to our stand at the Palace end of the Mall. The weather was poor but we made ourselves as comfortable as possible and we forgot the weather in watching the many Service detachments lining the Mall. Every party was getting cheered as it came along. The time soon passed and eventually there was a great cheer as the first of the Royal procession began to leave the Palace. What a thrill it was to see the fine bearing of the mounted escorts and the marching detachments. The Royal Family and the many foreign representatives came by in their carriages and each got a special cheer. At last the golden coach with the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh came out of the Palace Gates and my ears nearly burst with the loud cheering which greeted Her Majesty. I was proud to be British and a member of the pre-Services. After the procession had passed we made our way into Green Park and there listened to the Coronation ceremony over the loud speakers. At 3.15 p.m. we were back in the stands to see the Queen return to the Palace. In spite of the rain it was a magnificent sight and the Queen was radiant. I was especially impressed with Sir Winston Churchill smiling and giving the "V" sign and with Queen Salote who seemed to ignore the rain and smiled and waved to us. After the processions had passed there was a rush to the Palace Gates to see the Queen and the Royal Family who came out on to the balcony, where they smiled and waved repeatedly to the vast crowds. Eventually we made our way back to the coach and I returned with unforgettable memories of a wonderful day. L/CPL. R. HOWARD, No. 2 Company. 1953


Reply ID 92543

06/02/2013 by Dave

GOLDINGS IN AUSTRALIA Mr. Hayton, one of Dr. Barnardo's representatives, visited Goldings this term to choose specimens of work from the different trades. He is travelling to Australia soon and part of his duties there will be to show the Australian people what type of work is being attempted by this school. To help him in this work and give our Australian friends an impression of our work here, specimens of work from the various shops will be exhibited. It is always difficult to make a choice of work which will give a fair reflection of the departments but with the aid of the specimens of work and various photographs we hope our Australian friends will have a good idea of our life here. Below is an account of the work which will be exhibited. Woodwork Department Chess Table, by T. Edwards, Age 14. Turned Bowls and Bedside Lamp, by T. Barnes, Age 15+. Book Trough, by D. Ellis, Age 16+. Sheet-metal Work Department Copper Jug, by W. Walford, Age 17. Painted Toilet Can (The same pattern as made for the Prince of Wales when he opened Goldings in 1922) by J. Woods, Age 16. Scoop, by L. Maitland, Age 15. Set of Pastry Cutters, by M. and K. Brierley, Age 14. Printing Department Specimen Type Faces Colour Proofs General Specimens of Printing Bootmakers Department 1 Pair of Youths boots Hand-sewn welted, 1 Odd repaired shoe riveted clump and heel. 1 Odd repaired shoe Long soled and heeled sewn. 1 Odd shoe Fancy Coronation design in rivets.


Reply ID 93090

10/03/2013 by Dave

SCHOOL LIFE AT GOLDINGS School Houses The School is divided into six school houses named after famous benefactors of the Homes, namely: Somerset, Cairns, Aberdeen, Mount Stephen, Buxton, McCall, who compete for trophies in all the different spoils and other competitions. Outdoor Sports Football, Cricket, Baseball. A yearly Sports Day. Swimming Pool. Indoor Sports Billiards, Table Tennis, and other quiet games. Leave Periods All well conducted boys are allowed a great deal of freedom. They have opportunity several times during the week of visiting Hertford or going for walks with their friends. Pocket Money There is a liberal allowance of pocket money for boys who are prepared to use it sensibly. On admission each boy receives 1/- a week which rises in regular stages to 2/6. Many boys manage to add to their pocket money by doing odd jobs for people in their spare time. Clubs, etc. There are many groups a boy is free to join to occupy his leisure hours. Some like the Army Cadet Force, with its frequent camps, and the Brass Band and Pets Club are active all the year round and others are confined to the dark evenings in the winter months. The latter include Art and Drama Clubs, Discussion Group, voluntary Physical Training and Boxing Teams, and also Hobbies Clubs, such as model aeroplane making and leather work. Cinema There is a free cinema show each week except during the Summer months.


Reply ID 93239

23/03/2013 by Dave

I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER . . . I CANNOT say these memories of Goldings are all in the right order, only the first ones and the last, the rest just come tumbling out of my memory store. I remember the day the boys came from Stepney, how they arrived at Hertford East Station and marched to Goldings led by the band, my father being the Bandmaster. It appeared as though all Hertford had turned out to see them and how wonderful it was for the boys to see Goldings for the first time with all the fields and trees, after the East End of London where they had only a courtyard in which to play their games. I can remember the visit of The Prince of Wales, the present Duke of Windsor, who came for the official opening of the School. The last and poignant memory was the sad and bewildering news that the Council of the Homes had decided to close the School.Now come the memories at random. An early memory is the building and dedication of the School Chapel. I remember the fetes we used to have in the grounds each summer. The people came in their hundreds and were entertained by the Band and the Gymnastic Team. There was cricket in the long days of summer, and watching football on the top field with the thermometer below freezing and an icy wind from the northeast. I remember how staff and boys worked together to dig out the new swimming pool. Then there were the dark years of war. How hard and uncomfortable it was spending the nights in the trenches. There was the land mine that didn't go off, and the tragic night when one of the masters was killed and the corner of Clock House was blown away.I remember when The Verney was bought and converted into a home for the printer boys. In the days before television, what fun the staff had rehearsing plays, which were put on for the benefit of the boys, and I can remember too, many fine plays and other entertainments given by the boys for the enjoyment of the staff. It was a great day also when the boys were allowed to shed their uniforms and dress like any other boys. Shall we ever forget Sunny Dymchurch? What jokes were made about it, yet what happy times we had there.I remember the boys going to Wimbledon and the renown they brought to Barnardo's, when all the world could see the results of their good training. Not so very long ago the new wing was built and Princess Margaret came to open it. What a day that was and how proud we were of the magnificent display of fine craftsmanship. I remember a day in November 1965, when the new schoolroom block was opened by Sir John Hunt. That was another occasion when everyone admired the skills, which the boys had learned at Goldings. Who would have dreamt then that there was any thought of closure? For over forty years my life has revolved about Goldings and all that this home and school has meant. They are mostly happy memories and now in my home I have many things made by Golding’s boys. I will always treasure them and REMEMBER. DORIS MASLIN The Goldonian 1967 N.B. Mrs Maslin was the daughter of the bandmaster from Stepney Causeway, Mr Marchant who was the bandmaster, who in 1922 marched the boys up the North Road as the new residents to Goldings. I have later discovered from another member of Staff that when she married Mr Maslin, many of the family and friends were shocked as Mr Maslin was a former Barnardo Boy from Stepney and such an arrangement was not encouraged, but time was to prove the doubters wrong as they lived very happily indeed until the passing of Mr Maslin in 1965,and Mrs Maslin was to survive for many years later, and as can been seen in her recollections, she adored Goldings and the boys. My memory of them is clouded, but Mr Maslin was a kind member of Staff and as I unfolded this story I can now understand his kindness to us as like us, he was a Barnardo Boy, but we was never told of his former background! Dave.


Reply ID 93510

09/04/2013 by Dave

THE QUERULOUS QUEENS When the Dramatic Section of Hertford Townswomen's Guild won the cup for the best all-women's cast at the Hertford Dramatic Festival they put up a very fine performance. A lively play, full of historic interest and humour, The Querulous Queens found scope for some splendid acting by the cast of eleven ladies. On 27th April the cast visited Goldings and gave a repeat performance for the School which was greatly appreciated. The evening was marked by the attendance of a group of twenty-five visitors from Herts Training School. The following took part: - Mesdames: Joyce Clark, Marion Palmer, Dora Millar, Vi Wells, Freda Kitching, Doris Maslin, M. Fullager, Doris Tordoff, Marjorie Stocks, Vera Goshawk, Billie Tidd. Producer: James Mitchell. The Goldonian 1951


Reply ID 93512

09/04/2013 by Dave

LETTER FROM AN OLD BOY A letter has been received by Mr. Maslin from David W. Green, now in Canada. He congratulates us on the issue of THE GOLDONIAN which was sent to him. He is playing cricket out there, and last year toured Philadelphia and New York City. "Out of 43 games we lost 9, drew 7, and won 27, quite a good season. I stood fourth in the averages with an average of 31.5 for 32 games". This year the programme consists of 40 games, one against the M.C.C. touring side. [David Green is still remembered with pleasure at Goldings. He was always a delightful person to know.—EDITORS] The Goldonian 1951


Reply ID 93514

09/04/2013 by Dave

AN EXTRACT FROM A LETTER FROM AN OLD BOY PTE. STEPHENSON, Hong Kong. Dear Matron, Thank you very much for your very nice letter 1 received a feW days ago. It was most welcome. Since I received your letter I have had an exciting time and a rather dangerous one. I expect you heard from the wireless and read in the newspapers about the riOTs in Hong Kong in early March. I was caught in one as I was coming out of the cinema. I was beaten up and when I came to I found myself in a military hospital having suffered a severe blow on the head from a chunk of concrete which made an ugly wound causing bruises and shock. When I was able to realise my surroundings I looked at the next BEd. Who do you think was there? Ronnie Hindmarsh. He was also at Goldings. You remember him he was very friendly with Jimmie Goode. He had been beaten up too. At the time of writing everything is fine with me. I hope you are in good health and happiness. How are the prefects progressing now? Well matron I really must close now with all my fondest and best wishes to the staff from, Ex-prefect, Steve. The Goldonian 1952


Reply ID 93957

17/05/2013 by Dave

THE FAIR held on Hartham Common, Hertford, on the 23rd September, 1959, proved to be a very successful one indeed, and brought many visitors and local inhabitants flocking to the gates. Inside, the leading manufacturer's of many different articles had put forward a display of their best selling products, including washing machines and television sets, followed by practically everything a person or family needs for a well-furnished home. The local brewers in Hertford, Messrs. McMullen and Co., also had an attractive stand on which they displayed an ingenious machine showing all the important steps in beer brewing. After the crowd had seen almost everything, it was announced that there would be a series of displays. The Fire and Ambulance Brigade came first with a very interesting display of their methods of putting out fires and attending to accidents. Then followed a display by our School's Cadet Band who put on an excellent show followed by the Gym Team which was equally successful. All this put together made an afternoon's visit worthwhile at Hertford's Trade Fair, and the boys had something to be proud about, after taking part in such an achievement. JOHN BASSETT


Reply ID 93959

17/05/2013 by Dave

An Old Boy Talks to the Printers ON THURSDAY, 8th October, 1959, Victor Barber, a Goldings Old Boy and a product of the Printing Department, gave a talk to the department in the Old Schoolroom. As well as outlining his own career since leaving the School he gave an interesting account of Canada,. its opportunities and its labour set-up allied to the printing industry. It would appear from his remarks that the qualifications most likely to advance one up the ladder is 1o be 'a good printer'. Technical Schools are few and far between and it is the Trade Union which has assumed responsibility for apprentice training. The printer in Canada rates alongside the doctor, junior lawyer, etc., in fact, he is middle-class and can cope with, buying a house, a car and life's necessities without too much strain. Victor Barber paid tribute to his training here and stressed that if he could become a foreman at twenty-seven years of age, the Golding's apprentice today, with so much longer in full training, should have little difficulty in holding a good job. Victor works in Vancouver, with a newspaper firm which produces daily and evening papers, papers which quite often contain sixty-four pages. (The paper boys must earn their cash in Canada!) After his address he invited questions and was soon busy supplying the answers. Mr. Millar thanked the speaker and wished him well on his return. R. S. 1959


Reply ID 94163

06/06/2013 by Dave

IN MEMORIAM. In memory of Sidney Knell, who passed away on 22nd August, after a brief illness. He was a senior member of Buxton House where he was very popular. He bad four years' experience in the Printing Department, and was due to leave for employment shortly, where he would undoubtedly have done well. He was proficient at his work, and was held in high esteem by his colleagues and the Staff. He was also a member of the School Band, being a capable performer on the Trombone. We extend our deepest sympathies to his parents in their great loss. 1929


Reply ID 94198

09/06/2013 by Dave

THE EARTHQUAKE IN INDIA "THE terrible disaster which occurred in India was brought very close to us at Goldings. Mr. Charles Paylor, the young officer killed with his men, was the elder son of our Matron here. He is well remembered by many for the assistance he rendered us in our school cricket and football and also on the occasion, when he came to Camp with us. He had left England just two months previously, to take up service with" his squadron, in India. He was reported by his Squadron Commander, to be a most brilliant officer and one who shewed exceptional ability and promise in his career in the Royal Air Force. The very deepest sympathy of the Staff and boys goes out to Matron and her younger son, in their great sorrow, and also our prayers, that God will comfort and sustain them in the great and overwhelming loss which they have experienced. 1935


Reply ID 94332

19/06/2013 by Dave

Lawn Tennis Towards the close of last summer our School was invited to become an affiliated member of the Hertfordshire Lawn Tennis Association. The invitation came from the Hon. Secretary of the Hertfordshire L.T.A., Mr. G. R. Dunning, who, impressed by the performance of the ball-boys at Wimbledon last year, himself offered to pay the necessary subscription for the next three years. Our sincere thanks go to Mr. Dunning for this kind offer, which was accepted and for the interest he has shown in the School. During the coming season therefore, the School is to have for the first time a tennis team. At first the team will be a mixed one comprising Staff and Boys paired, but it is intended, once the boys have gained in experience, to play one or two matches, fielding a purely boys' team. In tennis as in all other games natural ability is not sufficient, practice is essential and any boy who hopes to "make the team," must be prepared to work hard in order to be chosen. The summer season, so far as Lawn Tennis is concerned, will be an experimental period, but it is hoped an enjoyable one. Whilst we may not exactly astound the people of Hertfordshire with tales of our success, still I trust that taking part in competitive tennis will arouse throughout the School a greater interest in the game. So far seven evening fixtures have been arranged, both home and away, as follows:.— 22nd May Eastern Electricity Board Home 29th May Hertford L.T.C Home 5th June County Hall Home I3th June I.C.I., Welwyn Away l0th July County Hall Away 15thJuly Hertford L.T.C Away 24th July Eastern Electricity Board Home K. T. S. N. 1958


Reply ID 94333

19/06/2013 by Dave

GOLDINGS HARD TENNIS COURTS Since the summer of 1947 boys from Goldings have attended Wimbledon annually and have become famous in the tennis world as "top flight" ball boys. This close association with the game and being able to watch the world's best players in action, has been responsible for creating a personal interest, and many creditable performers have been produced on the Goldings' grass courts. Generally only one grass court was available, and the demand for bookings being so great, individual play and interest was naturally limited. It was this lack of facilities that prompted the Headmaster to start the ball rolling, and interest the sub-committee in granting money for the constructing of two hard courts or as they are known in the trade all weather courts. A conference between the Headmaster and myself followed to consider the all important issue, total cost. Two estimates were prepared (i) an all in figure of some £2,500 assuming that work would be completely contracted out to a specialist firm and (ii) an estimate assuming that most of the work and construction would be carried out by the gardening department. The second project was agreed upon and the committee granted £900. Mr. Wheatley then wrote to the All England Tennis Club, and they very kindly made a donation of £100 towards the outlay. The choosing of a suitable site, and the planning of all the actual detail was then considered the original plans having being studied and approved by the committee the real operations commenced in October, 1958. Before this date, however, work had begun on the casting of the concrete edging tiles, starting in June, sixteen were made each week, until a total of 220 was reached. Levels were taken with a dumpy level, and the key pegs fixed. From these readings it was ascertained that 600 tons of earth would need to be removed. While this was in progress, ashes were being obtained weekly from the local gas works, 20 tons being required to lay 6 inches of base. These in turn had to be hand riddled, so that the rough could be laid first, followed by the finer. The whole being rolled in three layers, (a) the soil bed, (b) the rough ash and (c) the fine surface. At the same time the edging tiles were concreted into position, and the work of erecting the surrounding netting put in hand. On 20th April, 1959, an outside firm who had been invited to carry out the final laying of the playing asphalt started their operations, and with the assistance of two boys, completed this work in two weeks. The gardening department again took over, completing the project by tying in all the netting, etc. and green spraying the whole area. It was with great relief and no doubt personal satisfaction to myself and the rest of the department, when the courts were officially opened and declared ready for use on 20th May, 1956. In conclusion, I would like to thank the boys of the gardening department for all the extremely hard work which they put in to this work, often under very unpleasant and uncomfortable conditions, and to many of the masters who gave both technical and active assistance. L.E. 1956


Reply ID 94335

19/06/2013 by James007

quote:
Originally posted by Dave
Lawn Tennis Towards the close of last summer our School was invited to become an affiliated member of the Hertfordshire Lawn Tennis Association. The invitation came from the Hon. Secretary of the Hertfordshire L.T.A., Mr. G. R. Dunning, who, impressed by the performance of the ball-boys at Wimbledon last year, himself offered to pay the necessary subscription for the next three years. Our sincere thanks go to Mr. Dunning for this kind offer, which was accepted and for the interest he has shown in the School. During the coming season therefore, the School is to have for the first time a tennis team. At first the team will be a mixed one comprising Staff and Boys paired, but it is intended, once the boys have gained in experience, to play one or two matches, fielding a purely boys' team. In tennis as in all other games natural ability is not sufficient, practice is essential and any boy who hopes to "make the team," must be prepared to work hard in order to be chosen. The summer season, so far as Lawn Tennis is concerned, will be an experimental period, but it is hoped an enjoyable one. Whilst we may not exactly astound the people of Hertfordshire with tales of our success, still I trust that taking part in competitive tennis will arouse throughout the School a greater interest in the game. So far seven evening fixtures have been arranged, both home and away, as follows:.— 22nd May Eastern Electricity Board Home 29th May Hertford L.T.C Home 5th June County Hall Home I3th June I.C.I., Welwyn Away l0th July County Hall Away 15thJuly Hertford L.T.C Away 24th July Eastern Electricity Board Home K. T. S. N. 1958
This is amazing to watch. http://www.britishpathe.com/video/out-takes-cuts-from-cp-339-reel-1-of-2-wimbledon/query/hertford


Reply ID 94539

06/07/2013 by Dave

LOOKING BACK The morning of 19th October, 1949, was a sad one for me, because I was leaving Goldings and my very good friends there, in order to join the R.A.F. My stay at Goldings was a very pleasant one, although I must confess that, at the beginning, I thought I should never settle down and be happy. I was fortunate enough to have a foster-brother with me at Goldings. He is now serving in Egypt with the Royal Sussex Regiment Band, and is very happy there. I always look forward to spending a week-end at Goldings to see my old friends again, and I always enjoy a game of cricket whenever it can be arranged. The first two months of my time in the R.A.F. were not very pleasant. The work and drill were difficult and the weather was bitterly cold. The cold winds would sweep in howling from the sea and almost blow us over as we stood stiffly on the square. I spent much time in cleaning brass and shining my boots. Anyone who enjoys "spit and polish" will find plenty of opportunity when he joins the Forces! After the first eight weeks life became easier, and I received the precious gift of a week's leave. After my leave I went with some companions of my "square-bashing" period to a R.A.F. station near Cambridge as an "On the Job Trainee". Here I receive training for the particular work the R.A.F. requires me to do while I am serving with them. There is plenty of opportunity for keen sportsmen or athletes. Anyone who has ability at football, cricket, or indoor games like table-tennis, billiards, snooker or darts, will get ample opportunity to show his skill. May I offer a word of advice to Goldings boys who contemplate joining the R.A.F.? You must stick up for yourself, but don't boast or "throw your weight around." Braggarts are not liked and are called "Big Head." When you come to select your trade think carefully before you vote to become an Administrative, Technical or Messing Orderly, Such high-sounding positions are impressive, but those who select this group usually end up in the cook-house! Good luck to you all. J.W.J. SUMMER OF 1950. Footnote: Jimmy James was a staunch supporter of Goldings and was later to return as Teacher in the Printing Department. He was House Captain,and School Captain and was looked upon by Mr Wheatley (The Headmaster) as the ideal pupil that was a reflection of the type of young man that Goldings and the School would send into the World after Goldings. He was fostered on a farm in Norfolk before he came to Goldings.After his National Service he returned to Hertford, married a local girl and became a respected citizen of Hertford and was a member of the local bowling club along with other Staff Members of Goldings. Sadly he passed away a few years ago but many of our Old Boys remember him with pride.


Reply ID 94722

21/07/2013 by Dave

LUNARDI'S BALLOON DESCENT IN HERTFORDSHIRE Vincent Lunardi was born at Luca on 11th January, 1795. He became secretary to Prince Caramanico, the Neapolitan ambassador. He experimented with a balloon which was thirty-three feet in circumference, and finally put it on show at the Lyceum in the Strand, where more than twenty thousand people visited it. He originally intended to ascend from Chelsea Hospital, but the conduct of the crowd at a garden at Chelsea, which destroyed the fine balloon of a Frenchman named de Moretz, changed his mind. He was then permitted to ascend from the artillery ground, and on 15th September, 1795, the balloon was inflated with hydrogen. Lunardi ascended alone, in the presence of the Prince of Wales and an enormous crowd of spectators. He took up with him a pigeon, a dog and a cat. The balloon was furnished with oars by which he hoped to raise or lower it at pleasure. Shortly after starting the pigeon escaped and one of the oars became broken and fell. After an hour-and-a-half's flight he descended at South Mimms in Hertfordshire, and landed the cat. He ascended again, but owing to certain difficulties which developed he was forced to descend at Standon, near Ware. In the following year he made several successful ascents from Kelso, Edinburgh and Glasgow. In one of these flights he traversed one hundred and ten miles. He also made numerous attempts in Italy and Spain, and died in Lisbon in 1806. Although he was an intrepid balloonist, he added little to the real technique of ballooning. However, by his exploits, he drew wide attention to the possibilities of flight. The first man ever to fly in a balloon was Jean Francis Pilatre de Rozien, on 15th October, 1789. And now all you boys who like to call Hertford "half-dead," if you look up your history you will find Hertford was very much alive in the days gone by. ALAN MARSTON. Goldonian 1949


Reply ID 94723

21/07/2013 by Dave

MULTIPLICATION! You may long have been familiar with the fact that it is not possible to fold a sheet of paper in halves more than twenty times. You don't believe it? Well, try it for yourself! Or perhaps you would like to ask your Dad which he would prefer: To take a job for a year at £10 per week, or to start at a wage of quarter of a penny for the first week and to have his wages doubled each week throughout the year? Work it out for yourself! Recently we came across a variation of the same theme that we had not seen previously: Long ago, it is said, a poor but ingenious Arabian peasant invented the game of Chess, which so delighted the Sheikh that he summoned the man to his palace and invited him to name his reward. The peasant asked the potentate to cause a grain of wheat to be placed on the first square of his chessboard, two grains on the next square, four on the third, and so on, doubling the number each time, until the final square was reached. The Sheikh, thinking the man a simpleton, immediately gave orders for the request to be granted. But it was soon discovered that all the wealth of Arabia would be hopelessly insufficient to pay for the required quantity of wheat! You don't believe it? Well, try it for yourself! Goldonian 1949


Reply ID 94724

21/07/2013 by Dave

SECOND ANNUAL PRIZE-GIVING DAY One of the high-lights of the year is the Prize-Giving Day, and on 18th July of this the second year, we were fortunate to have as our guest of honour Lt.-Col. L. W. Giles, O.B.E., M.C. After a hymn had been sung, Mr. Tetley, Chairman of the Goldings Committee, opened the proceedings with some introductory remarks. He spoke of the new buildings in and around the School, how much had been planned, and how anxiously he awaited the completion of this work. The other important development had been the inauguration of the apprenticeship scheme for Printers. He urged those boys who formed this group of apprentices that they still owed allegiance to the School, and that the success of the apprenticeship scheme was very largely in their hands. The Headmaster introduced the guests, among whom were Councillor F. L. and Mrs. Patmore, Mayor and Mayoress of Hertford, and Mrs. Hil1, President of the Barnardo Helpers' League (Hertford Branch), and then gave a brief resume of the year's work. Among many useful points he stressed the importance of character building in preference to mere cleverness. He was proud of the School and of the boys' work in their various trades. Lt.-Col. L. W. Giles spoke briefly of the training of the boys to manhood, of the value of education in life, and emphasised the great virtue of gentleness that we all need in our dealings one with another. He presented the prizes to those boys who had attained a high standard in school and trade instruction. Mr. Tucker thanked Lt.-Col. Giles on behalf of Dr. Barnardo's Homes and the School; and after a prayer and the singing of a Commemoration Hymn the ceremony ended with the National Anthem. S. C. C. SUMMER 1950


Reply ID 95136

18/08/2013 by Dave

'THIS TIME NEXT WEEK' THE ABOVE title may not mean anything to many boys, but I have no doubt some of our adult readers will have seen the reviews on this book which was written by Leslie Thomas, an Old Boy of the Homes, and who spent some time here at Goldings during the war. The book tells his own story of what life in Barnardo's is like as seen through the eyes of a boy, and includes accounts of happy, sad, amusing, and even embarrassing times, but there is no self pity! All people mentioned in the book are real people, and no doubt the Gaffer (Mr. Gardner), Porky, Chesty, Earole, Tiptoe, etc., will all recognize themselves. I do not know if any of the above were at Goldings.) Despite the fact that Leslie Thomas has now made his mark in the world, and in particular the newspaper world, he obviously is in no way ashamed to let people know that his upbringing was in Dr. Barnardo's Homes. What a pity so many try to hide this fact. Today Leslie is a feature writer on London's Evening News. He covered the Eichmann Trial, and was in the official press party during the last Royal visit to Australia. He has had a play produced on B.B.C. Television, and is a broadcaster of note. A few months ago he recorded a programme on life in a Children's Home, and he chose his old Home, Kingston. He is married with two children and lives in Watford. N. T. P. Summer 1964


Reply ID 95139

19/08/2013 by Capitalist piglet

Can I just go on record to write how fascinating I find this thread & immense thanks to Dave for his work in adding to this to the history of Hertford.


Reply ID 95142

20/08/2013 by Marilyn

Might be an idea to think about publishing it, I am sure the museum would sell it.


Reply ID 95186

21/08/2013 by Dave

Many thanks to the last two people who have left me messages of support in my project to make the general public aware that once Goldings housed many Barnardo Boys and towards it closure boys from broken families (I was such a child) with such fine work by the staff in giving us pride once more in ourselves. You must remember that many of these boys came from all corners of the U.K. The slums of the Black Country,Northern Ireland, Yorkshire, Scotland, and many other far flung areas and were not familiar with towns and villages of Hertford, and Waterford with the clean air and grassy fields, quite an eye opener to many of us, me included, so it's no surprise that these areas became our adopted second home as it was remembered by many of us as a happy times of our childhood (13-16, or in the case of the printers 21) and many boys married and remained in the surrounding area. Though Hertford is no longer the sleepy town we all remember it's still the place we all recall with affection. What did surprise me was that most of the present occupiers of Goldings were not aware that it was once a boys home in 110 acres of grounds! They do now welcome us back on our special day, the first Saturday in October for our re-union held at Sele Farm. I have compiled the History of Goldings up to 1945,so hope to complete it this year when it closed in July 1967, most of this is on our web site http://www.goldings.org. Goldings 1922-67, many thanks Dave.


Reply ID 95475

08/09/2013 by Dave

As many readers may not be aware,our annual re-union approachs soon,Saturday 5th October at Sele Farm Community Centre.Our re-union has been going officially since 1958 and was encouraged by our Headmaster Mr Wheatley so the Old Boys at the time were welcomed back to their former School.The only rule he laid down was we must be well dressed including any fashions at the time provided it was tidy (Mr Wheatley activley encouraged us to be a reflection to the times)and we must still continue to adhere to the School rules which meant you did your turn in the running of the School (working in the Kitchen,serving in the dining room,and cleaning as you would have if you remained at the School)For this you were provided with free accomodation.Many of the Printers remained in Hertford and the surrounding area's and married local girls,and we were encouraged to bring along girlfriend's,wives,and families,as a family was an important step for us to acheive as Mr Wheatley would point out which brings a stable life.Many of the Old Boys also emigrated but try every year to return to the "Fold" as many do. Our re-union is open to the general public who may he interested in Hertford's past History and we welcome anyone,just listen in on some of their past antic's!The present new residents of Goldings have kindly allowed us back into the mansion and share stories with them about Goldings.Dave.


Reply ID 95501

10/09/2013 by Dave

New graves project Tower Hamlets Cemetery in East London has been identified as the next site for a memorial to commemorate the unmarked graves of Barnardo's children buried there. National Council member Jean Clark, who is leading the fundraising project and has already raised thousands of pounds for memorials at Barkingside and Goldings, said: 'Tower Hamlets was the closest cemetery to Barnardo's former homes and headquarters in Stepney Causeway and the area was also the focus of much of the charity's work in Victorian times. Two volunteers, Diane Kenton and Anne Quaid, who are trustees at the Tower Hamlet cemetery, have kindly offered their support to the project. They are working their way through Barnardo's records to identify the children buried there. This is a huge undertaking and will hopefully provide Barnardo's with a definitive list of children who died in care. What we do know is that two of the children buried in unmarked graves were, in fact, Dr Barnardo's own children - because the philanthropist did not want to show them preferential treatment. Tower Hamlets was a very popular cemetery for people from the East End in Victorian times and by 1889, around 247,000 bodies had been interred there. Around 70 per cent of these were 'public' graves (i.e. those of poor people who could not afford a funeral and were unmarked.) Several persons, entirely unrelated to each other, could be buried in the same grave within the space of a few weeks. The cemetery closed in the 1960s and after years of neglect has now been transformed into a local nature reserve and is a site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation. The high brick walls surrounding it are listed Grade II and the area now resembles natural woodland, with many bird and insect species making it their home. Footnote..Jean was a former Barnardo Girl, who lives in Birmingham and has spent most of her time in locating and funding, via friends and car boot sales, in the restoring of graves of Barnardo Children who have been buried around the country but have been sadly allowed to remain unattended and maintained by Barnardo's. I first met her with my project for the Goldings Boys who died and were buried at Waterford, and like Jean I felt that their names should not fade away with time. so with funding from Jean we set about righting this wrong, and the present memorial at Waterford, once again the boys records the boys names for posterity, and Jean has now moved on to right another wrong, and after that she intends to do similar work in Australia along the same lines. And if I could quote her "I intend to make sure that as many boys and girls who died are remembered that were in the care of Dr Barnardo" DAVE.



Reply ID 96496

02/11/2013 by Dave

Dave I am sorry that this is so late but our new Vicar, The Reverend Jenny Gray has inaugurated an All Souls' Service at St Michael and All Angels Church Waterford. The service is this coming Sunday, 3rd November at 6.30 p.m. We will, of course, include the names of those Goldonians that died and are buried in the churchyard but please let me know of any other deceased Goldonians that you would wish us to include. Anybody that can attend the service will be most welcome, please make yourselves known to the sidesman. Malcolm


Reply ID 96497

02/11/2013 by Dave

Hello Malcolm,there was one other boy who is not mentioned or buried at Waterford, his name was David Abdi, who was on a Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme in Wales for a group of Goldings Boys to gain their Silver Award.On the trek on the Brecon Hills he began to fall behind and got seperated from the party and at the same time mist was descending on the hills.A search party was organised but without any success.The following morning his body was found,and at the inquest it was stated that David had picked up a virus some time previously which may have been a factor in his demise,this was Spring 1965.When I was organising the memorial stone at Waterford I made enquires to Barnardo as to why he wasn't buried at Waterford and they informed me that at his mothers request she wanted him buried at Barkingside which was his first Barnardo home and is now the first name on the memorial at Barkingside along with many,many other names.I had just left Goldings that same month of the tragedy.The write up at the time on his short life is on our front page top right hand corner under the heading "Goldonians" go to Goldonian Summer 1965 page 6.He was 15 at the time and a printer by trade, and was part of the schools football team, basketball team,cricket and athletics.I do hope this information is of interest to the Service,and the mention of his short live will be remembered to many who are not aware of this tragedy.Many thanks for the interest shown about William Baker Technical School and for visiting our site.I will try to organise someone to represent us but this short notice may present a problem as I know many of the Old Boys would have liked to have been there including me Dave.


Reply ID 96498

02/11/2013 by glyner

quote:
Originally posted by Dave
Dave I am sorry that this is so late but our new Vicar, The Reverend Jenny Gray has inaugurated an All Souls' Service at St Michael and All Angels Church Waterford. The service is this coming Sunday, 3rd November at 6.30 p.m. We will, of course, include the names of those Goldonians that died and are buried in the churchyard but please let me know of any other deceased Goldonians that you would wish us to include. Anybody that can attend the service will be most welcome, please make yourselves known to the sidesman. Malcolm
Hi Dave unfortunately I will not be able to attend but maybe a mention for my Dad Jimmy James whose ashes are scattered on the site of the old cricket square.


Reply ID 96504

03/11/2013 by Dave

quote:
Originally posted by glyner
quote:
Originally posted by Dave
Dave I am sorry that this is so late but our new Vicar, The Reverend Jenny Gray has inaugurated an All Souls' Service at St Michael and All Angels Church Waterford. The service is this coming Sunday, 3rd November at 6.30 p.m. We will, of course, include the names of those Goldonians that died and are buried in the churchyard but please let me know of any other deceased Goldonians that you would wish us to include. Anybody that can attend the service will be most welcome, please make yourselves known to the sidesman. Malcolm
Hi Dave unfortunately I will not be able to attend but maybe a mention for my Dad Jimmy James whose ashes are scattered on the site of the old cricket square.
Hello Glyner, This is the request I have sent to Malcolm to be included in this evenings Service Hello Malcolm I have Recieved this message this morning and maybe if it's not to late could also mention Jimmy James who was a Goldings Old Boy. Jimmy entered Goldings in 1945,and was taught the trade of Printing.He became school captain which was the pinnicle of any Goldings Boys as not many boys acheived such status.He was a very proficient sportsman for the school,and was as Mr Wheatley (the headmaster)said "a reflection of the type of pupil he hoped we all could be" Later in the 60's he was to return as a Master in the Print.Jimmy never lost touch with his Goldings roots always playing any type of sport for the school and even up to the time just before he passed away was still playing Bowls for The School of Print Club.He married a local girl and remained a resident of Hertford throughout his life as many residents can recall.He did make a comment once to me "How did you feel when you left Goldings" "I couldn't wait to take up my trade back in my home town of Walsall" "Did you...I cried all the way down Goldings Lane on my way to Hertford North!" A much respected Goldings Old Boys by us all, and reflected the spirit of the William Baker Technical School,quite a brusk man when he spoke to us, but his heart remained with us all as he once replied to my question "Did you have a favourite pupil Jim" "No I loved you all" Sadly he passed away a few years back,but his last request was for his ashes to be scattered on the Cricket Table at Goldings were his spirit remains to this day Dave.


Reply ID 96505

03/11/2013 by glyner

quote:
Originally posted by Dave
quote:
Originally posted by glyner
quote:
Originally posted by Dave
Dave I am sorry that this is so late but our new Vicar, The Reverend Jenny Gray has inaugurated an All Souls' Service at St Michael and All Angels Church Waterford. The service is this coming Sunday, 3rd November at 6.30 p.m. We will, of course, include the names of those Goldonians that died and are buried in the churchyard but please let me know of any other deceased Goldonians that you would wish us to include. Anybody that can attend the service will be most welcome, please make yourselves known to the sidesman. Malcolm
Hi Dave unfortunately I will not be able to attend but maybe a mention for my Dad Jimmy James whose ashes are scattered on the site of the old cricket square.
Hello Glyner, This is the request I have sent to Malcolm to be included in this evenings Service Hello Malcolm I have Recieved this message this morning and maybe if it's not to late could also mention Jimmy James who was a Goldings Old Boy. Jimmy entered Goldings in 1945,and was taught the trade of Printing.He became school captain which was the pinnicle of any Goldings Boys as not many boys acheived such status.He was a very proficient sportsman for the school,and was as Mr Wheatley (the headmaster)said "a reflection of the type of pupil he hoped we all could be" Later in the 60's he was to return as a Master in the Print.Jimmy never lost touch with his Goldings roots always playing any type of sport for the school and even up to the time just before he passed away was still playing Bowls for The School of Print Club.He married a local girl and remained a resident of Hertford throughout his life as many residents can recall.He did make a comment once to me "How did you feel when you left Goldings" "I couldn't wait to take up my trade back in my home town of Walsall" "Did you...I cried all the way down Goldings Lane on my way to Hertford North!" A much respected Goldings Old Boys by us all, and reflected the spirit of the William Baker Technical School,quite a brusk man when he spoke to us, but his heart remained with us all as he once replied to my question "Did you have a favourite pupil Jim" "No I loved you all" Sadly he passed away a few years back,but his last request was for his ashes to be scattered on the Cricket Table at Goldings were his spirit remains to this day Dave.
Dave that is great thank you, think that sums him up perfectly thanks very much.


Reply ID 96650

17/11/2013 by Dave

REFLECTIONS ON GOLDINGS After leaving Much Wenlock I came to Goldings on the 31st January, 1950. When I arrived life was much harder than it is now. If you did anything wrong you were lucky to escape punishment. The second night I was here I had my first experience of a school fire. The way everyone acted impressed me. Everyone was steady and orderly and there was no foolish behaviour. It made me realize the truths behind a school life, but I had much more to notice. The work was highly skilled, sports took a prominent place, and the boys appreciated anything that was done for them. It was easy to notice a school pride and the conduct of the boys seemed very good, perhaps because the duty house was used for more work than it is to-day. Everything seemed well organized and comparing it with my previous life, it seemed a new life, with everything and everyone looking smart. But comparing to-day with when I came. Does a fire practice keep to rule? How many things do you do wrong and get away with? In 1950 it seemed strange that anyone should let you off. The work here has stayed skilled but you have had to be encouraged with bonuses. Thinking of the bonus you have worked harder. How many of the boys appreciate what is done for them? Who are the boys who are let off punishment for smoking and never do it again? Do you do it again? Who now speaks of a pride in the school? Has every boy got his boots cleaned smartly at morning prayers? Everything is given and organized for you, really too much because you do not know how to appreciate it all. There is too much good done for the boys, the Headmaster is too kind, so much so that it is not thought of. M. JARVIS Winter 1952 Footnote...Mike Jarvis was born with only one hand but this never held him back as he became a very succsseful Carpenter,and after leaving Goldings he opened a shop in London in later life,a succssful hardware shop,he also became the School Captain at Goldings and is on record as the first disabled boy to work at Wimbledon,on the score board.No longer with us but fondly remembered by the Old Boys of his era as a fun loving "Goldings" boy.Dave.


Reply ID 96651

17/11/2013 by Dave

Mr Wheatley, Headmaster of Goldings from 1945-66.A major influence on the improvements to the school which David (his son)only scratch's the surface, but we now all realise in later life what he did for us that gave us that little more confidence when we left Goldings.Dave. My Father grew up in Birmingham within a a family of modest circumstance, the third of four brothers. His father was a skilled Artisan, and his mother a housewife. After Primary School, he won a Scholarship to the George Dixon Grammar School where he became Head Boy, and also won the Victor Ludorum Cup for being the outstanding all round Sportsman and Athlete. He gained distinction in Mathematics and Chemistry at the Higher School Certificate level followed by the winning of a Full Entrance Scholarship to Birmingham University were he obtained a B Sc Honours Degree Metallurgy. He was the first person in the Wheatley family to reach this level. During these growing up years money was very tight and the position became so much worse when his father was killed in a road accident whilst riding his Bicycle. He was only able to stay at the University with the support of his older brother Douglas who was employed by Birmingham City Council and gave my father pocket money for many years. He graduated in 1926 at the time of the General Strike and jobs of any kind were extremely hard to find. A committed Socialist, he spent time raising money for the Miners, and after many interviews finally obtained his first Teaching Post at Bierton Road Senior Mixed School in Birmingham were he remained for several Years. My father had met my mother when he was 19 and she was 16. They were engaged for four years before marrying in April 1932. My sister Celia, arrived thirteen months later. He gained his first Headship at the age of 27, ,and moved in 1933 to the Village of Byfield in Northamptonshire were he met several Dr Barnardo Boys who were Attending Byfield County School. Some were waiting to greet him many years later when he arrived at Goldings (William Baker Technical School) It was also here that I arrived in early 1937. During the early years of the war, he moved on to Oundle where he was appointed Headmaster of the Secondary Modern Mixed School and were he also became active in the Home Guard and the War effort. In 1944, for reasons unknown to me, he made a career change and became a Lecturer in Engineering at Burton-on-Trent Technical College where the family remained until he was appointed the first Headmaster of the William Baker Technical School. (Prior to this Goldings had a Governor, and was run on a Military system with the senior boys being Corporals and Sergeants which Mr Wheatley dispensed with and replaced with the new system of House Captains and Prefects to each House, and toned down much of the military system in favour of a more homely outlook.) Dave This move proved to be the fulfillment of all his dreams and the rest, they say, his History. I found my father a kindly and internally emotional person. He was a real humanitarian who did not like to think ill of other. He always looked for the best in people. He also believed that Celia and I should grow up establishing our own interests and boundaries, but always being there to give constructive support and council when needed. My father was also extremely intelligent, very fair minded and well ahead of his years in pastoral care. My fathers own personal interests and hobbies were widespread. In no particular order they included sports activities, painting, photography, classical music, learning German, reading, traveling to Sweden and Austria, and during his latter years quiet days with my mother at their caravan. My parents moved to Surrey on retirement where my father Taught part time at a Local Authority for unsettled boys. However, his health deteriorate quite quickly and he suffered A series of strokes before dying in March 1975. He was always A great inspiration to me and someone I always looked up to Throughout his life. I still miss him 38 years later and it always saddened me that he did not live to enjoy the retirement he had So richly deserved.


Reply ID 96851

01/12/2013 by Dave

CAIRNS HOUSE NOTES: WINTER 1961 Christmas will soon be with us and most of the boys are looking forward to going away for their Christmas holidays. We who are staying behind wish them all a very Happy Christmas and the best of everything. The boys who are staying at Goidings for Christmas have no need to feel down-hearted as we understand they are very well provided for and in most cases have as good, if not better time than some of those who go on leave. In conclusion may we wish Mr. and Mrs. Wheatley, Mr. and Mrs. Embleton, all members of staff and the boys a very Happy Christmas and a prosperous and successful New Year. WINTER 1960 Dancing Class THE WINTER activities once again included the popular Monday Dancing Class, and now with three months behind us and a successful Gala Dance which was held in October, the dancing is as popular as ever, and the standard of dancing improving every week. The unfortunate problem we have, as always, is the shortage: of young ladies, our number of boys is always governed by the number of girls, and I think mention should be made of the 'faithfuls' who turn up every Monday regardless of weather and are usually danced off their feet; these loyalists, led by Mrs. Newton, are the Misses J. Sheppard, M. Wade, C. Mitchell, C. Hooper, with out whom our class would lose its lustre. Thank you ladies, your enthusiasm is much appreciated. We are hoping to increase the number of young ladies in the near future from the Girl Guides in the district; we look forward to their company. Another Gala Dance is to be held in December, and as it is close to Christmas we shall no doubt have a 'haymaker'. MACANDREW HOUSE NOTES WINTER 1960 Christmas will soon be upon us and already we are thinking about decoration arrangements, it certainly does not seem a year since we were planning last Chnstmas's affairs. I am certain it will not be any of the lads' faults if the first Christmas we spend together as the MacAndrew boys is not a success.


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