GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Questions and discussions about the town's past
dave
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GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby dave » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 6:55 pm

Goldings was opened in April 1922 as The William Baker Technical School, for boys from Dr Barnardo's who had shown that they were in need of a trade and were capable of being taught. In it's early days it housed 300 boys (it was a boys school only) who lived and learn't their trade there. In the beginning, boys would stay till around 17 years of age and Dr Barnardo Homes would then find them a place of work and lodgings. Some boys who didn't know of their parents were encouraged to emigrate to Canada. This was finally stopped by the Canadian Goverment, and there are strong cases of abuse and using them as cheap labour, of coarse there were also a lot of success as Dr Barnardo's can confirm and many of the Old Boys who became well respected Canadian Citizens. Emigration was now switched to Australia and continued until about 1967. Many of our Old Boys travel from their new countries to once again meet up wth their former friends from Goldings at our annual re-union in October held in Hertford where we all once lived. The boys came from all parts of the U.K. and many of their local dialects were watered down to what we consider "London accent" and when many of us returned to our former towns and cities were considered "Posh" as in my case as a son from the "Black Country". In the early days Goldings was run on a very strict military style and you had to salute the Governor if you saw him round the grounds. Senior boys were selected and were promoted to Sergeants and Corporals and were used to control the rest of the boys. In April 1945 due to Goverment changes to Education a Headmaster was appointed who was to take the school out of it's 20's attitude to schooling and bring it into a well respected and renowned school for very skilled tradesmen, and in some quarters at Dr Barnardo's this was opposed as the views were still Victorian ! But Mr Wheatley (the new headmaster ) soldiered on and appointed staff that were of similar thoughts to running a Barnardo Home that he held. Later in the late 50's and 60's boys started to be sent to Goldings from Local Authorities to try to help them reform and teach them a trade (as I was in 1962-65) and there were many success. Sadly Barnardo's (the new modern name) decided to close Goldings in july 1967...why...we have never truly found out? but many friendships between the boys and staff were forged which is very plain to see at our re-unions after nearly 50 years.Many thanks for taking the time to read this shortened account of Goldings, further information is on our web site, http://www.goldings.org Dave.

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Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby admin » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 9:45 pm

Link to archived discussion 2008-2013

http://www.hertford.net/yoursay/topic.php?id=3475

dave
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Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby dave » Fri 20 Dec, 2013 5:06 pm

JANUARY 1936
CHRISTMAS-TIDE AT GOLDINGS
THE festive season at Goldings was ushered in on Sunday evening, 22nd December, when the choir sung appropriate carols, very well rendered, and the Governor read the immortal story of "Scrooge," which was listened to with wrapt attention by the School.
On Monday evening, 23rd December, we had a great disappointment, we were looking forward to a concert by some friends from London, but owing to wide-spread thick fog and ice-covered roads, they were unable to reach us; we look forward, however, to greeting them on some future occasion.
Tuesday, Christmas Eve, we bid God-speed to 92 of our fellows who set off on leave to visit relatives and friends and it was inspiring to see their happy faces and judging from the extra anointing they had given to their heads (in flavours various), by the time they reached their villages, the inhabitants thereof would lift up their faces and fancy that spring was in the (h)air and would smell them coming before they saw them. Our fervent wish for them was, that they all would have as jolly a time as we intended to have at Goldings.
Christmas morning broke to the strains of "Christians, awake!" kindly rendered by early rising members of our Band and it was much appreciated as they played jolly well.
What more fitting for commencing such a day, as to gather round our Lord's Table where quite a nice number of boys and members of the Staff met in remembrance and thanksgiving for God's great gift to all men.
At 10.30 a.m. the school met together to join in the Christmas Morning service in the Chapel. Well-known Christmas hymns were sung most heartily by all. The Governor in his sermon, referred to "God's unspeakable Gift" to us all, and counselled all to keep that before them during this time of happiness and the giving and receiving of gifts.
Then "Christmas Dinner! !" Did one ever see legs of pork, baked potatoes, brussels-sprouts, "stuffing," pudding and custard disappear as if by magic, and yet no conjurer was there. The excitement when Father Christmas arrived, bringing in a snow-covered case, which, when opened, contained a courier from Snow Town, who handed out boxes of Joke Bombs and a special "bottle of whisky" for the Governor. The noise of squeakers and hooters when the bombs were all exploded and shot their contents all over the dining-hall, who can describe it?
Later, a splendid tea. "Where do the boys put it?" someone said, and finally a great show of films during the evening, and then to bed. All summed up in a remark made by a sma.ll boy to the Governor, "This, Sir, has been the happiest day of my life."

dave
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Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby dave » Sat 25 Jan, 2014 7:37 pm

Goldings Old Boy writes from Canada
Readers of THE GOLDONIAN may be interested to read a letter from a Goldings old boy:
North Vancouver,
British Columbia,
Canada.
10th February, 1959. Dear Mr. Millar,
The enclosed newspaper is a recent copy published in the community where I am a resident. I am sending it on to you, not as a gesture of personal tub-thumping, but as an indication to the boys presently at the School that Barnardo boys can go just as far as those more fortunate in their early years. Most of the other candidates in the election referred to have the benefit of a university education, but I was still able to compete with them on equal terms.
I have been living in Canada for eleven years and for most of that time have worked in the composing rooms of various daily newspapers. At present I am employed at the largest newspaper operation in Canada (318 men in composing room). Despite my comparative youth I have, for the past five years, been employed in a supervisory capacity. This would appear to give a good indication of my early training at the trade.
You probably need a few clues to place me among the hundreds of boys who have passed through your department in the last twenty years. I started in the composing room, working in your office, in June, 1940. After working at the case under Mr. Riley and Mr East, I was moved down In the Linotype department under Mr, Gladwell, where my fellow-students were William Long and Dennis Smith. I left Goldings in August, 1942, to take a job at a country weekly at Royston, Herts,
While at the school I recieved my cricket and football colours (one as Dennis and the other as Victor), and was a member of the band.
I hope to visit England sometime this year for a holiday.
I will very much like the Opportunity of showing my wife and three children around the school when I come over.
Hoping that you and your staff are able to carry on your invaluable work for many years to come.
Yous Sincerely
VICTOR BARBER.

Also enclosed was a newspaper, The. Citizen, which gave reports of the Municipal Elections in North Vancouver. The poll was the largest ever and Victor Barber was the candidate who headed it. Making reference to Councillor Barber, the newspaper said "Friends insisted that he would not only win re-election but would top the polls but Councillor Barber didn't take any chances ...
and in another paragraph: "No one was surprised when Councillor Barber topped the Polls."
The letter needs little comment but we should like to make reference to what a proud story this is. Although the present members of the School can be justified in taking a pride in such old boys as Victor Barber they surely must realise that simply coming to Goldings did not produce such results. Rather it was the training at Goldings plus a good character, a stout heart and the determination to do well that made the difference.
We shall look forward to a visit from the Barbers when they come to the "Old Country" later in the year, when our congratulations will be given first hand.
M
Last edited by dave on Sat 25 Jan, 2014 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dave
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Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby dave » Sat 25 Jan, 2014 8:01 pm

Reprint from the first "Goldonian"
The Rev. F. C. Macdonald who was Governor of our School in 1927, has very kindly given me permission to reproduce his letter to the Editor of the first edition of THE GOLDONIAN ever published:
"1st March, 1927" "Dear Mr. Editor,
"It is with much pleasure 1 have heard of your project to produce a monthly magazine for the School. I have been very proud of the supplement for which you and your committee have been responsible in the Guild Messenger, and, judging from the quality of that, I am certain this bigger venture will prove successful. It will be a great gain for us to have an organ of mutual communication in our School life. First of all, I think it will be a bond of comradeship, for it will be a tangible expression of our common life and interests. It will, therefore, make for solidarity, for your readers will realise they are not merely isolated units, but members of a family, all striving for the same end.
"Secondly, the magazine will be a record of achievement. Month by month, by means of the printed page, we shall be able to visualise the varied activities of our community in work and play. Outstanding events will be more than of passing interest; they will become permanent impressions. In this respect the magazine should have a most stimulating effect. It will prevent the tendency to regard sectional interests as of paramount importance, and will provide a balanced review of the activities of our corporate life as a whole.
"Lastly, the magazine will give scope for the development of self expression, in the form of writing, to a large number of boys who have had little opportunity for such work. The night school classes have revealed how great is our need in this respect. Thoughts are continually passing in the minds of all, but many boys lack the power to express them. The articles and letters you will receive will be efforts to reproduce thought In concrete terms, and your contributors will find by practice expression, though seemingly impossible at first it is attainable by all in some measure, and when obtained, is one of the most useful gifts bestowed to man.
"With all my heart I wish your Venture every success. Your motto suggests that the end croWns the work. You are at the beginning of your effort; the End is in the mists of fortune, but there is no doubt whatever that in this particular work, its ultimate completion, both to readers and contributers,and will be realised as a coronet of success.
Summer 1959

dave
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Joined: Mon 16 Dec, 2013 3:54 pm

Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby dave » Sat 25 Jan, 2014 8:07 pm

YE OLDE GOLDYNGS
A recently published book, "The Carrington Diary", by W. Branch Johnson, gives an interesting account of rural life in our district as it was 160 years ago. Having been inspired by this peep into the past, one felt a desire to probe into still more remote times in search of the origin of that glamorous name of our estate, Goldings.
The village of Waterford existed as far back as the year 1248, when King Henry III reigned in England, and the chief landowner was one John Goldyng. Obviously, his name became attached to the area and records of the name appear in the Charter Rolls of 1315. Descendants of John Goldyng, Ralph Payn, Richard Revel and John Rykener, have supplied other estate names in this locality; Paynes Hall, Revels Hall and Rickneys.
John Carrington was the occupier of Bacon's Farm, which, in the days of Trafalgar and Waterloo, adjoined the Goldings estate on the Western side. John was a busy farmer and local dignitary, and he found time to keep a very detailed diary of his daily routine between the years 1797 and 1810. He was a great friend of his neighbour, Richard Emmott, who resided at Goldings. In those days, the North Road out of Hertford ran through the middle of the Goldings estate, by the mansion, which overlooked our present cricket field, and stood on the site of our grass tennis courts. The buildings now comprising the Printing and Shot-making Departments are all that remain today of Richard Emmott's residence. The present road from Goldings to Waterford follows the route of the old highway. Surface erosion has recently uncovered parts of the stone causeway which was used to help the wheels of stagecoaches along the steep incline down jnto Waterford. In 1875, Robert Smith built the present mansion, and was allowed to close this road, causing a new one to be constructed round the edge of the estate.
In his diary, John Carrington mentions a visit to "Hartford" (as it was then known) to see a famous road walker named Webster, who attempted to walk from London to York in sixty hours. Meeting this worthy at the Cold Bath Inn, during a pause for refreshment, John accompanied the athlete on his way as far as Goldings, but the farmer then found the pace too hot, and reports that they covered ;1 mile in ten minutes. He was asked to make the first Census of the district in 1801, and mentions that he was also asked to officiate at Bramfield as tax collector. Another public duty he undertook was the inspection of local roads, and he was much troubled by frequent flooding of the highway at Goldings. He was also called in to arbitrate when Squire Emmott upset the Waterford community
Goldonian Magazine Spring 1967

Marilyn
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Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby Marilyn » Sun 09 Mar, 2014 1:00 pm

Just wanted to say I have found the Goldings website very useful whilst researching the early history of Goldings but there are one of two errors. There are some wrong dates on there. For instance the death of the chimney sweep was 1844 not 1852 and he was 10 years old not 7.

dave
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Joined: Mon 16 Dec, 2013 3:54 pm

Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby dave » Fri 30 May, 2014 4:20 pm

Thanks Marilyn for that I have changed the article in question on our site to suit. Sorry I took so long to reply but have had trouble logging on, any more don't hesitate to let me know. I would sooner be told and have it correct
Thanks again.
Dave

Marilyn
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Joined: Sun 01 Dec, 2013 11:09 am

Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby Marilyn » Wed 04 Jun, 2014 7:55 am

Hi Dave

Used a lot of info from the website in my research on Goldings for the exhibition on Bengeo so many thanks. The sweep story I found the newspaper cutting for that was how I was sure of the dates. Sir Minto Farquhar was living there with his wife and father in law Lord Reay at the time and it was because of this incident he lobbied in parliament to get the use of boys up chimneys outlawed. Unfortunately the law itself did not come in until after he died!

Paul Woolley
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Joined: Wed 31 Dec, 2014 3:33 pm

Re: GOLDINGS (The William Baker Technical School)

Postby Paul Woolley » Wed 31 Dec, 2014 4:17 pm

Recently we had a visit to Frogmore Paper Mill in Apsley from a former print trainee. He was interested in our small letterpress printing area and told me he had trained as a comp. Being close to Watford I was aware of the local printing history and Watford College of Printing but never heard of the print training at The William Baker Technical School.
I have found a couple of web sites that have some information from which I gather there was print technical training and a separate print works which produced Barnado's publications.
I have a couple of questions. Did the boys receive print related training as part of the school curriculum and then leave to get apprenticeships in industry or was there some form of local apprenticeship? Was the training given in the print works or was there a separate training area with it's own comp frames, type and presses etc.?
Any information about the print training or pointers to sources of information would be appreciated.
Last edited by Paul Woolley on Fri 02 Jan, 2015 12:59 am, edited 4 times in total.


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